Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Multi-route transmission potential of SARS-CoV-2 in healthcare facilities.
J Hazard Mater. 2021 01 15; 402:123771.JH

Abstract

Understanding the transmission mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 is a prerequisite to effective control measures. To investigate the potential modes of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, 21 COVID-19 patients from 12-47 days after symptom onset were recruited. We monitored the release of SARS-CoV-2 from the patients' exhaled breath and systematically investigated environmental contamination of air, public surfaces, personal necessities, and the drainage system. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in 0 of 9 exhaled breath samples, 2 of 8 exhaled breath condensate samples, 1 of 12 bedside air samples, 4 of 132 samples from private surfaces, 0 of 70 samples from frequently touched public surfaces in isolation rooms, and 7 of 23 feces-related air/surface/water samples. The maximum viral RNA concentrations were 1857 copies/m3 in the air, 38 copies/cm2 in sampled surfaces and 3092 copies/mL in sewage/wastewater samples. Our results suggest that nosocomial transmission of SARS-CoV-2 can occur via multiple routes. However, the low detection frequency and limited quantity of viral RNA from the breath and environmental specimens may be related to the reduced viral load of the COVID-19 patients on later days after symptom onset. These findings suggest that the transmission dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 differ from those of SARS-CoV in healthcare settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Key Laboratory of Clinical In Vitro Diagnostic Techniques of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Key Laboratory of Clinical In Vitro Diagnostic Techniques of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Key Laboratory of Clinical In Vitro Diagnostic Techniques of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Key Laboratory of Clinical In Vitro Diagnostic Techniques of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Key Laboratory of Refrigeration and Cryogenic Technology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, 999077 Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 999077, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.Department of Nosocomial Infection Control, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China.Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Key Laboratory of Refrigeration and Cryogenic Technology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China. Electronic address: weijzju@zju.edu.cn.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Key Laboratory of Clinical In Vitro Diagnostic Techniques of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, 310000, China; Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China; State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310000, China. Electronic address: chenyuzy@zju.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33254782

Citation

Feng, Baihuan, et al. "Multi-route Transmission Potential of SARS-CoV-2 in Healthcare Facilities." Journal of Hazardous Materials, vol. 402, 2021, p. 123771.
Feng B, Xu K, Gu S, et al. Multi-route transmission potential of SARS-CoV-2 in healthcare facilities. J Hazard Mater. 2021;402:123771.
Feng, B., Xu, K., Gu, S., Zheng, S., Zou, Q., Xu, Y., Yu, L., Lou, F., Yu, F., Jin, T., Li, Y., Sheng, J., Yen, H. L., Zhong, Z., Wei, J., & Chen, Y. (2021). Multi-route transmission potential of SARS-CoV-2 in healthcare facilities. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 402, 123771. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123771
Feng B, et al. Multi-route Transmission Potential of SARS-CoV-2 in Healthcare Facilities. J Hazard Mater. 2021 01 15;402:123771. PubMed PMID: 33254782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multi-route transmission potential of SARS-CoV-2 in healthcare facilities. AU - Feng,Baihuan, AU - Xu,Kaijin, AU - Gu,Silan, AU - Zheng,Shufa, AU - Zou,Qianda, AU - Xu,Yan, AU - Yu,Ling, AU - Lou,Fangyuan, AU - Yu,Fei, AU - Jin,Tao, AU - Li,Yuguo, AU - Sheng,Jifang, AU - Yen,Hui-Ling, AU - Zhong,Zifeng, AU - Wei,Jianjian, AU - Chen,Yu, Y1 - 2020/08/25/ PY - 2020/06/16/received PY - 2020/08/12/revised PY - 2020/08/15/accepted PY - 2020/12/1/entrez PY - 2020/12/2/pubmed PY - 2020/12/16/medline KW - Aerosol KW - COVID-19 KW - Environmental sampling KW - Exhaled breath KW - SARS-CoV-2 SP - 123771 EP - 123771 JF - Journal of hazardous materials JO - J Hazard Mater VL - 402 N2 - Understanding the transmission mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 is a prerequisite to effective control measures. To investigate the potential modes of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, 21 COVID-19 patients from 12-47 days after symptom onset were recruited. We monitored the release of SARS-CoV-2 from the patients' exhaled breath and systematically investigated environmental contamination of air, public surfaces, personal necessities, and the drainage system. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in 0 of 9 exhaled breath samples, 2 of 8 exhaled breath condensate samples, 1 of 12 bedside air samples, 4 of 132 samples from private surfaces, 0 of 70 samples from frequently touched public surfaces in isolation rooms, and 7 of 23 feces-related air/surface/water samples. The maximum viral RNA concentrations were 1857 copies/m3 in the air, 38 copies/cm2 in sampled surfaces and 3092 copies/mL in sewage/wastewater samples. Our results suggest that nosocomial transmission of SARS-CoV-2 can occur via multiple routes. However, the low detection frequency and limited quantity of viral RNA from the breath and environmental specimens may be related to the reduced viral load of the COVID-19 patients on later days after symptom onset. These findings suggest that the transmission dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 differ from those of SARS-CoV in healthcare settings. SN - 1873-3336 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33254782/Multi_route_transmission_potential_of_SARS_CoV_2_in_healthcare_facilities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3894(20)31760-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -