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The utility of household Grocery Purchase Quality Index scores as an individual diet quality metric.
Br J Nutr. 2020 Dec 03 [Online ahead of print]BJ

Abstract

The Grocery Purchase Quality Index (GPQI) reflects concordance between household grocery purchases and US dietary recommendations. However, it is unclear whether GPQI scores calculated from partial purchasing records reflect individual-level diet quality. This secondary analysis of a 9-month randomised controlled trial examined concordance between the GPQI (range 0-75, scaled to 100) calculated from 3 months of loyalty-card linked partial (≥50 %) household grocery purchasing data and individual-level Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores at baseline and 3 months calculated from FFQ (n 209). Concordance was assessed with overall and demographic-stratified partially adjusted correlations; covariate-adjusted percentage score differences, cross-classification and weighted κ coefficients assessed concordance across GPQI tertiles (T). Participants were middle aged (55·4 (13·9) years), female (90·3 %), from non-smoking households (96·4 %) and without children (70·7 %). Mean GPQI (54·8 (9·1) %) scores were lower than HEI scores (baseline: 73·2 (9·1) %, 3 months: 72·4 (9·4) %) and moderately correlated (baseline r 0·41 v. 3 months r 0·31, P < 0·001). Correlations were stronger among participants with ≤ bachelor's degree, obesity and children. Scores showed moderate agreement (κ = 0·25); concordance was highest in T3. Participants with high (T3) v. low (T1) GPQI scores had 7·3-10·6 higher odds of having HEI scores >80 % at both time points. Household-level GPQI was moderately correlated with self-reported intake, indicating their promise for evaluating diet quality. Partial purchasing data appear to moderately reflect individual diet quality and may be useful in interventions monitoring changes in diet quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI02881, USA.Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI02881, USA.Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA02114, USA. Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA02115, USA.Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI02881, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33267922

Citation

Parker, Haley Wynne, et al. "The Utility of Household Grocery Purchase Quality Index Scores as an Individual Diet Quality Metric." The British Journal of Nutrition, 2020, pp. 1-9.
Parker HW, de Araujo C, Thorndike AN, et al. The utility of household Grocery Purchase Quality Index scores as an individual diet quality metric. Br J Nutr. 2020.
Parker, H. W., de Araujo, C., Thorndike, A. N., & Vadiveloo, M. K. (2020). The utility of household Grocery Purchase Quality Index scores as an individual diet quality metric. The British Journal of Nutrition, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114520004833
Parker HW, et al. The Utility of Household Grocery Purchase Quality Index Scores as an Individual Diet Quality Metric. Br J Nutr. 2020 Dec 3;1-9. PubMed PMID: 33267922.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The utility of household Grocery Purchase Quality Index scores as an individual diet quality metric. AU - Parker,Haley Wynne, AU - de Araujo,Carolina, AU - Thorndike,Anne N, AU - Vadiveloo,Maya K, Y1 - 2020/12/03/ PY - 2020/12/4/pubmed PY - 2020/12/4/medline PY - 2020/12/3/entrez KW - Diet quality KW - Grocery purchase data KW - Grocery purchase quality KW - Healthy Eating Index SP - 1 EP - 9 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr N2 - The Grocery Purchase Quality Index (GPQI) reflects concordance between household grocery purchases and US dietary recommendations. However, it is unclear whether GPQI scores calculated from partial purchasing records reflect individual-level diet quality. This secondary analysis of a 9-month randomised controlled trial examined concordance between the GPQI (range 0-75, scaled to 100) calculated from 3 months of loyalty-card linked partial (≥50 %) household grocery purchasing data and individual-level Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores at baseline and 3 months calculated from FFQ (n 209). Concordance was assessed with overall and demographic-stratified partially adjusted correlations; covariate-adjusted percentage score differences, cross-classification and weighted κ coefficients assessed concordance across GPQI tertiles (T). Participants were middle aged (55·4 (13·9) years), female (90·3 %), from non-smoking households (96·4 %) and without children (70·7 %). Mean GPQI (54·8 (9·1) %) scores were lower than HEI scores (baseline: 73·2 (9·1) %, 3 months: 72·4 (9·4) %) and moderately correlated (baseline r 0·41 v. 3 months r 0·31, P < 0·001). Correlations were stronger among participants with ≤ bachelor's degree, obesity and children. Scores showed moderate agreement (κ = 0·25); concordance was highest in T3. Participants with high (T3) v. low (T1) GPQI scores had 7·3-10·6 higher odds of having HEI scores >80 % at both time points. Household-level GPQI was moderately correlated with self-reported intake, indicating their promise for evaluating diet quality. Partial purchasing data appear to moderately reflect individual diet quality and may be useful in interventions monitoring changes in diet quality. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33267922/The_utility_of_household_Grocery_Purchase_Quality_Index_scores_as_an_individual_diet_quality_metric_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114520004833/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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