Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Evaluating the Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Mutation D614G on Transmissibility and Pathogenicity.
Cell. 2021 01 07; 184(1):64-75.e11.Cell

Abstract

Global dispersal and increasing frequency of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein variant D614G are suggestive of a selective advantage but may also be due to a random founder effect. We investigate the hypothesis for positive selection of spike D614G in the United Kingdom using more than 25,000 whole genome SARS-CoV-2 sequences. Despite the availability of a large dataset, well represented by both spike 614 variants, not all approaches showed a conclusive signal of positive selection. Population genetic analysis indicates that 614G increases in frequency relative to 614D in a manner consistent with a selective advantage. We do not find any indication that patients infected with the spike 614G variant have higher COVID-19 mortality or clinical severity, but 614G is associated with higher viral load and younger age of patients. Significant differences in growth and size of 614G phylogenetic clusters indicate a need for continued study of this variant.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. Electronic address: e.volz@imperial.ac.uk.Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; Pathogen Genomics Unit, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK.MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.Pathogen Genomics Unit, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK.Institute of Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.Pathogen Genomics Unit, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK.Pathogen Genomics Unit, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK.MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.https://www.cogconsortium.uk/.Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.Institute of Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Department of Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, London, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: a.rambaut@ed.ac.uk.School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; Pathogen Genomics Unit, Public Health Wales NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK; Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich, UK. Electronic address: connortr@cardiff.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33275900

Citation

Volz, Erik, et al. "Evaluating the Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Mutation D614G On Transmissibility and Pathogenicity." Cell, vol. 184, no. 1, 2021, pp. 64-75.e11.
Volz E, Hill V, McCrone JT, et al. Evaluating the Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Mutation D614G on Transmissibility and Pathogenicity. Cell. 2021;184(1):64-75.e11.
Volz, E., Hill, V., McCrone, J. T., Price, A., Jorgensen, D., O'Toole, Á., Southgate, J., Johnson, R., Jackson, B., Nascimento, F. F., Rey, S. M., Nicholls, S. M., Colquhoun, R. M., da Silva Filipe, A., Shepherd, J., Pascall, D. J., Shah, R., Jesudason, N., Li, K., ... Connor, T. R. (2021). Evaluating the Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Mutation D614G on Transmissibility and Pathogenicity. Cell, 184(1), 64-e11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.11.020
Volz E, et al. Evaluating the Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Mutation D614G On Transmissibility and Pathogenicity. Cell. 2021 01 7;184(1):64-75.e11. PubMed PMID: 33275900.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the Effects of SARS-CoV-2 Spike Mutation D614G on Transmissibility and Pathogenicity. AU - Volz,Erik, AU - Hill,Verity, AU - McCrone,John T, AU - Price,Anna, AU - Jorgensen,David, AU - O'Toole,Áine, AU - Southgate,Joel, AU - Johnson,Robert, AU - Jackson,Ben, AU - Nascimento,Fabricia F, AU - Rey,Sara M, AU - Nicholls,Samuel M, AU - Colquhoun,Rachel M, AU - da Silva Filipe,Ana, AU - Shepherd,James, AU - Pascall,David J, AU - Shah,Rajiv, AU - Jesudason,Natasha, AU - Li,Kathy, AU - Jarrett,Ruth, AU - Pacchiarini,Nicole, AU - Bull,Matthew, AU - Geidelberg,Lily, AU - Siveroni,Igor, AU - ,, AU - Goodfellow,Ian, AU - Loman,Nicholas J, AU - Pybus,Oliver G, AU - Robertson,David L, AU - Thomson,Emma C, AU - Rambaut,Andrew, AU - Connor,Thomas R, Y1 - 2020/11/19/ PY - 2020/08/21/received PY - 2020/10/14/revised PY - 2020/11/11/accepted PY - 2020/12/5/pubmed PY - 2021/1/16/medline PY - 2020/12/4/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - epidemiology KW - evolution KW - founder effect KW - spike SP - 64 EP - 75.e11 JF - Cell JO - Cell VL - 184 IS - 1 N2 - Global dispersal and increasing frequency of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein variant D614G are suggestive of a selective advantage but may also be due to a random founder effect. We investigate the hypothesis for positive selection of spike D614G in the United Kingdom using more than 25,000 whole genome SARS-CoV-2 sequences. Despite the availability of a large dataset, well represented by both spike 614 variants, not all approaches showed a conclusive signal of positive selection. Population genetic analysis indicates that 614G increases in frequency relative to 614D in a manner consistent with a selective advantage. We do not find any indication that patients infected with the spike 614G variant have higher COVID-19 mortality or clinical severity, but 614G is associated with higher viral load and younger age of patients. Significant differences in growth and size of 614G phylogenetic clusters indicate a need for continued study of this variant. SN - 1097-4172 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33275900/Evaluating_the_Effects_of_SARS_CoV_2_Spike_Mutation_D614G_on_Transmissibility_and_Pathogenicity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0092-8674(20)31537-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -