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Theory-based Behavioral Predictors of Self-reported Use of Face Coverings in Public Settings during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States.
Ann Behav Med. 2021 02 12; 55(1):82-88.AB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Investigating antecedents of behaviors, such as wearing face coverings, is critical for developing strategies to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to determine associations between theory-based behavioral predictors of intention to wear a face covering and actual wearing of a face covering in public.

METHODS

Data from a cross-sectional panel survey of U.S. adults conducted in May and June 2020 (N = 1,004) were used to test a theory-based behavioral path model. We (a) examined predictors of intention to wear a face covering, (b) reported use of cloth face coverings, and (c) reported use of other face masks (e.g., a surgical mask or N95 respirator) in public.

RESULTS

We found that being female, perceived importance of others wanting the respondent to wear a face covering, confidence to wear a face covering, and perceived importance of personal face covering use was positively associated with intention to wear a face covering in public. Intention to wear a face covering was positively associated with self-reported wearing of a cloth face covering if other people were observed wearing cloth face coverings in public at least "rarely" (aOR = 1.43), with stronger associations if they reported "sometimes" (aOR = 1.83), "often" (aOR = 2.32), or "always" (aOR = 2.96). For other types of face masks, a positive association between intention and behavior was only present when observing others wearing face masks "often" (aOR = 1.25) or "always" (aOR = 1.48).

CONCLUSIONS

Intention to wear face coverings and observing other people wearing them are important behavioral predictors of adherence to the CDC recommendation to wear face coverings in public.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Sakamaki, Honolulu, HI. Division of Science Integration, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, Cincinnati, OH.Division of Science Integration, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, Cincinnati, OH.CDC COVID-19 Response Team, Atlanta, GA.Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC, Atlanta, GA.Division of Science Integration, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC, Cincinnati, OH.CDC COVID-19 Response Team, Atlanta, GA.Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN.CDC COVID-19 Response Team, Atlanta, GA.Division of Viral Hepatitis National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC, Atlanta, GA.Office of the Director, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC, Atlanta, GA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33301024

Citation

Barile, John P., et al. "Theory-based Behavioral Predictors of Self-reported Use of Face Coverings in Public Settings During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States." Annals of Behavioral Medicine : a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 55, no. 1, 2021, pp. 82-88.
Barile JP, Guerin RJ, Fisher KA, et al. Theory-based Behavioral Predictors of Self-reported Use of Face Coverings in Public Settings during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States. Ann Behav Med. 2021;55(1):82-88.
Barile, J. P., Guerin, R. J., Fisher, K. A., Tian, L. H., Okun, A. H., Vanden Esschert, K. L., Jeffers, A., Gurbaxani, B. M., Thompson, W. W., & Prue, C. E. (2021). Theory-based Behavioral Predictors of Self-reported Use of Face Coverings in Public Settings during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States. Annals of Behavioral Medicine : a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 55(1), 82-88. https://doi.org/10.1093/abm/kaaa109
Barile JP, et al. Theory-based Behavioral Predictors of Self-reported Use of Face Coverings in Public Settings During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States. Ann Behav Med. 2021 02 12;55(1):82-88. PubMed PMID: 33301024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Theory-based Behavioral Predictors of Self-reported Use of Face Coverings in Public Settings during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United States. AU - Barile,John P, AU - Guerin,Rebecca J, AU - Fisher,Kiva A, AU - Tian,Lin H, AU - Okun,Andrea H, AU - Vanden Esschert,Kayla L, AU - Jeffers,Alexiss, AU - Gurbaxani,Brian M, AU - Thompson,William W, AU - Prue,Christine E, PY - 2020/12/11/pubmed PY - 2021/2/23/medline PY - 2020/12/10/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Face covering KW - Face mask KW - Planned behavior KW - Prevention KW - Social norms SP - 82 EP - 88 JF - Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine JO - Ann Behav Med VL - 55 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Investigating antecedents of behaviors, such as wearing face coverings, is critical for developing strategies to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine associations between theory-based behavioral predictors of intention to wear a face covering and actual wearing of a face covering in public. METHODS: Data from a cross-sectional panel survey of U.S. adults conducted in May and June 2020 (N = 1,004) were used to test a theory-based behavioral path model. We (a) examined predictors of intention to wear a face covering, (b) reported use of cloth face coverings, and (c) reported use of other face masks (e.g., a surgical mask or N95 respirator) in public. RESULTS: We found that being female, perceived importance of others wanting the respondent to wear a face covering, confidence to wear a face covering, and perceived importance of personal face covering use was positively associated with intention to wear a face covering in public. Intention to wear a face covering was positively associated with self-reported wearing of a cloth face covering if other people were observed wearing cloth face coverings in public at least "rarely" (aOR = 1.43), with stronger associations if they reported "sometimes" (aOR = 1.83), "often" (aOR = 2.32), or "always" (aOR = 2.96). For other types of face masks, a positive association between intention and behavior was only present when observing others wearing face masks "often" (aOR = 1.25) or "always" (aOR = 1.48). CONCLUSIONS: Intention to wear face coverings and observing other people wearing them are important behavioral predictors of adherence to the CDC recommendation to wear face coverings in public. SN - 1532-4796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33301024/Theory_based_Behavioral_Predictors_of_Self_reported_Use_of_Face_Coverings_in_Public_Settings_during_the_COVID_19_Pandemic_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/abm/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/abm/kaaa109 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -