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Vitamin D supplementation for term breastfed infants to prevent vitamin D deficiency and improve bone health.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020 12 11; 12:CD013046.CD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Vitamin D deficiency is common worldwide, contributing to nutritional rickets and osteomalacia which have a major impact on health, growth, and development of infants, children and adolescents. Vitamin D levels are low in breast milk and exclusively breastfed infants are at risk of vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency.

OBJECTIVES

To determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation given to infants, or lactating mothers, on vitamin D deficiency, bone density and growth in healthy term breastfed infants.

SEARCH METHODS

We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to 29 May 2020 supplemented by searches of clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and citations.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in breastfeeding mother-infant pairs comparing vitamin D supplementation given to infants or lactating mothers compared to placebo or no intervention, or sunlight, or that compare vitamin D supplementation of infants to supplementation of mothers.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias and independently extracted data. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of evidence.

MAIN RESULTS

We included 19 studies with 2837 mother-infant pairs assessing vitamin D given to infants (nine studies), to lactating mothers (eight studies), and to infants versus lactating mothers (six studies). No studies compared vitamin D given to infants versus periods of infant sun exposure. Vitamin D supplementation given to infants: vitamin D at 400 IU/day may increase 25-OH vitamin D levels (MD 22.63 nmol/L, 95% CI 17.05 to 28.21; participants = 334; studies = 6; low-certainty) and may reduce the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency (25-OH vitamin D < 50 nmol/L) (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.80; participants = 274; studies = 4; low-certainty). However, there was insufficient evidence to determine if vitamin D given to the infant reduces the risk of vitamin D deficiency (25-OH vitamin D < 30 nmol/L) up till six months of age (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.16 to 1.05; participants = 122; studies = 2), affects bone mineral content (BMC), or the incidence of biochemical or radiological rickets (all very-low certainty). We are uncertain about adverse effects including hypercalcaemia. There were no studies of higher doses of infant vitamin D (> 400 IU/day) compared to placebo. Vitamin D supplementation given to lactating mothers: vitamin D supplementation given to lactating mothers may increase infant 25-OH vitamin D levels (MD 24.60 nmol/L, 95% CI 21.59 to 27.60; participants = 597; studies = 7; low-certainty), may reduce the incidences of vitamin D insufficiency (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.57; participants = 512; studies = 5; low-certainty), vitamin D deficiency (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.24; participants = 512; studies = 5; low-certainty) and biochemical rickets (RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.44; participants = 229; studies = 2; low-certainty). The two studies that reported biochemical rickets used maternal dosages of oral D3 60,000 IU/day for 10 days and oral D3 60,000 IU postpartum and at 6, 10, and 14 weeks. However, infant BMC was not reported and there was insufficient evidence to determine if maternal supplementation has an effect on radiological rickets (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.18 to 3.31; participants = 536; studies = 3; very low-certainty). All studies of maternal supplementation enrolled populations at high risk of vitamin D deficiency. We are uncertain of the effects of maternal supplementation on infant growth and adverse effects including hypercalcaemia. Vitamin D supplementation given to infants compared with supplementation given to lactating mothers: infant vitamin D supplementation compared to lactating mother supplementation may increase infant 25-OH vitamin D levels (MD 14.35 nmol/L, 95% CI 9.64 to 19.06; participants = 269; studies = 4; low-certainty). Infant vitamin D supplementation may reduce the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.94; participants = 334; studies = 4) and may reduce vitamin D deficiency (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.72; participants = 334; studies = 4) but the evidence is very uncertain. Infant BMC and radiological rickets were not reported and there was insufficient evidence to determine if maternal supplementation has an effect on infant biochemical rickets. All studies enrolled patient populations at high risk of vitamin D deficiency. Studies compared an infant dose of vitamin D 400 IU/day with varying maternal vitamin D doses from 400 IU/day to > 4000 IU/day. We are uncertain about adverse effects including hypercalcaemia.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS

For breastfed infants, vitamin D supplementation 400 IU/day for up to six months increases 25-OH vitamin D levels and reduces vitamin D insufficiency, but there was insufficient evidence to assess its effect on vitamin D deficiency and bone health. For higher-risk infants who are breastfeeding, maternal vitamin D supplementation reduces vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D deficiency, but there was insufficient evidence to determine an effect on bone health. In populations at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation of infants led to greater increases in infant 25-OH vitamin D levels, reductions in vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D deficiency compared to supplementation of lactating mothers. However, the evidence is very uncertain for markers of bone health. Maternal higher dose supplementation (≥ 4000 IU/day) produced similar infant 25-OH vitamin D levels as infant supplementation of 400 IU/day. The certainty of evidence was graded as low to very low for all outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, RCSI & UCD Malaysia Campus (formerly Penang Medical College), George Town, Malaysia.Department of Pediatrics, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA.Central Clinical School, School of Medicine, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33305822

Citation

Tan, May Loong, et al. "Vitamin D Supplementation for Term Breastfed Infants to Prevent Vitamin D Deficiency and Improve Bone Health." The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol. 12, 2020, p. CD013046.
Tan ML, Abrams SA, Osborn DA. Vitamin D supplementation for term breastfed infants to prevent vitamin D deficiency and improve bone health. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020;12:CD013046.
Tan, M. L., Abrams, S. A., & Osborn, D. A. (2020). Vitamin D supplementation for term breastfed infants to prevent vitamin D deficiency and improve bone health. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 12, CD013046. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD013046.pub2
Tan ML, Abrams SA, Osborn DA. Vitamin D Supplementation for Term Breastfed Infants to Prevent Vitamin D Deficiency and Improve Bone Health. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020 12 11;12:CD013046. PubMed PMID: 33305822.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D supplementation for term breastfed infants to prevent vitamin D deficiency and improve bone health. AU - Tan,May Loong, AU - Abrams,Steven A, AU - Osborn,David A, Y1 - 2020/12/11/ PY - 2020/12/11/entrez PY - 2020/12/12/pubmed PY - 2021/1/16/medline SP - CD013046 EP - CD013046 JF - The Cochrane database of systematic reviews JO - Cochrane Database Syst Rev VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency is common worldwide, contributing to nutritional rickets and osteomalacia which have a major impact on health, growth, and development of infants, children and adolescents. Vitamin D levels are low in breast milk and exclusively breastfed infants are at risk of vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation given to infants, or lactating mothers, on vitamin D deficiency, bone density and growth in healthy term breastfed infants. SEARCH METHODS: We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to 29 May 2020 supplemented by searches of clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and citations. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in breastfeeding mother-infant pairs comparing vitamin D supplementation given to infants or lactating mothers compared to placebo or no intervention, or sunlight, or that compare vitamin D supplementation of infants to supplementation of mothers. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and risk of bias and independently extracted data. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of evidence. MAIN RESULTS: We included 19 studies with 2837 mother-infant pairs assessing vitamin D given to infants (nine studies), to lactating mothers (eight studies), and to infants versus lactating mothers (six studies). No studies compared vitamin D given to infants versus periods of infant sun exposure. Vitamin D supplementation given to infants: vitamin D at 400 IU/day may increase 25-OH vitamin D levels (MD 22.63 nmol/L, 95% CI 17.05 to 28.21; participants = 334; studies = 6; low-certainty) and may reduce the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency (25-OH vitamin D < 50 nmol/L) (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.80; participants = 274; studies = 4; low-certainty). However, there was insufficient evidence to determine if vitamin D given to the infant reduces the risk of vitamin D deficiency (25-OH vitamin D < 30 nmol/L) up till six months of age (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.16 to 1.05; participants = 122; studies = 2), affects bone mineral content (BMC), or the incidence of biochemical or radiological rickets (all very-low certainty). We are uncertain about adverse effects including hypercalcaemia. There were no studies of higher doses of infant vitamin D (> 400 IU/day) compared to placebo. Vitamin D supplementation given to lactating mothers: vitamin D supplementation given to lactating mothers may increase infant 25-OH vitamin D levels (MD 24.60 nmol/L, 95% CI 21.59 to 27.60; participants = 597; studies = 7; low-certainty), may reduce the incidences of vitamin D insufficiency (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.57; participants = 512; studies = 5; low-certainty), vitamin D deficiency (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.24; participants = 512; studies = 5; low-certainty) and biochemical rickets (RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.44; participants = 229; studies = 2; low-certainty). The two studies that reported biochemical rickets used maternal dosages of oral D3 60,000 IU/day for 10 days and oral D3 60,000 IU postpartum and at 6, 10, and 14 weeks. However, infant BMC was not reported and there was insufficient evidence to determine if maternal supplementation has an effect on radiological rickets (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.18 to 3.31; participants = 536; studies = 3; very low-certainty). All studies of maternal supplementation enrolled populations at high risk of vitamin D deficiency. We are uncertain of the effects of maternal supplementation on infant growth and adverse effects including hypercalcaemia. Vitamin D supplementation given to infants compared with supplementation given to lactating mothers: infant vitamin D supplementation compared to lactating mother supplementation may increase infant 25-OH vitamin D levels (MD 14.35 nmol/L, 95% CI 9.64 to 19.06; participants = 269; studies = 4; low-certainty). Infant vitamin D supplementation may reduce the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.94; participants = 334; studies = 4) and may reduce vitamin D deficiency (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.72; participants = 334; studies = 4) but the evidence is very uncertain. Infant BMC and radiological rickets were not reported and there was insufficient evidence to determine if maternal supplementation has an effect on infant biochemical rickets. All studies enrolled patient populations at high risk of vitamin D deficiency. Studies compared an infant dose of vitamin D 400 IU/day with varying maternal vitamin D doses from 400 IU/day to > 4000 IU/day. We are uncertain about adverse effects including hypercalcaemia. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: For breastfed infants, vitamin D supplementation 400 IU/day for up to six months increases 25-OH vitamin D levels and reduces vitamin D insufficiency, but there was insufficient evidence to assess its effect on vitamin D deficiency and bone health. For higher-risk infants who are breastfeeding, maternal vitamin D supplementation reduces vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D deficiency, but there was insufficient evidence to determine an effect on bone health. In populations at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation of infants led to greater increases in infant 25-OH vitamin D levels, reductions in vitamin D insufficiency and vitamin D deficiency compared to supplementation of lactating mothers. However, the evidence is very uncertain for markers of bone health. Maternal higher dose supplementation (≥ 4000 IU/day) produced similar infant 25-OH vitamin D levels as infant supplementation of 400 IU/day. The certainty of evidence was graded as low to very low for all outcomes. SN - 1469-493X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33305822/Vitamin_D_supplementation_for_term_breastfed_infants_to_prevent_vitamin_D_deficiency_and_improve_bone_health_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD013046.pub2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -