Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Intertidal Canopy-forming Seaweeds Modulate Understory Seaweed Photoprotective Compounds.
J Phycol. 2021 04; 57(2):645-654.JP

Abstract

Foundation species provide physical structure that enhances the diversity and abundance of associated organisms. Canopy-forming seaweeds are known to act as foundation species on rocky shores by lowering temperature and desiccation stress. Direct solar radiation, including ultraviolet (UV) light, can also reduce photosynthetic rates in algae, cause oxidative stress and DNA damage. The reduction in UV exposure provided by an algal canopy could therefore be important for understory organisms, including the red alga Chondrus crispus on New England's (USA) rocky shores, and this relationship may be more important at higher tidal elevations with increased low-tide exposure time. In field experiments, we investigated the relationship between tidal elevation and an index of C. crispus UV exposure, the concentration of UV-absorbing pigments. Low on the shore, C. crispus grew without a canopy. Higher on the shore, in the mid-intertidal zone, C. crispus was found under the canopy-forming rockweed, Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. At this elevation, C. crispus was shaded (>50%; >1 m above MLLW). We performed a canopy removal experiment that spanned the mid-zone where C. crispus and F. distichus subsp. evanescens co-occur and the low-zone (no canopy). Following canopy removal in the mid-zone, UV pigment concentrations increased with tidal elevation. After accounting for the effect of elevation, removal of the algal canopy resulted in UV-protective pigment concentrations 2-fold higher than in un-manipulated control plots. These results suggest that amelioration of solar UV exposure might be another mechanism by which canopy seaweeds, acting as foundation species, facilitate understory seaweeds on rocky shores.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, University of Washington, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, Washington, 98195, USA.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 321 Steinhaus Hall, Irvine, California, 92697-2525, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33314105

Citation

Roberts, Emily A., and Matthew E S. Bracken. "Intertidal Canopy-forming Seaweeds Modulate Understory Seaweed Photoprotective Compounds." Journal of Phycology, vol. 57, no. 2, 2021, pp. 645-654.
Roberts EA, Bracken MES. Intertidal Canopy-forming Seaweeds Modulate Understory Seaweed Photoprotective Compounds. J Phycol. 2021;57(2):645-654.
Roberts, E. A., & Bracken, M. E. S. (2021). Intertidal Canopy-forming Seaweeds Modulate Understory Seaweed Photoprotective Compounds. Journal of Phycology, 57(2), 645-654. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpy.13118
Roberts EA, Bracken MES. Intertidal Canopy-forming Seaweeds Modulate Understory Seaweed Photoprotective Compounds. J Phycol. 2021;57(2):645-654. PubMed PMID: 33314105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intertidal Canopy-forming Seaweeds Modulate Understory Seaweed Photoprotective Compounds. AU - Roberts,Emily A, AU - Bracken,Matthew E S, Y1 - 2021/02/06/ PY - 2020/10/31/revised PY - 2019/04/25/received PY - 2020/11/08/accepted PY - 2020/12/15/pubmed PY - 2021/4/21/medline PY - 2020/12/14/entrez KW - ecosystem engineer KW - facilitation KW - foundation species KW - physical stress KW - pigment KW - stress gradient KW - ultraviolet radiation SP - 645 EP - 654 JF - Journal of phycology JO - J Phycol VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - Foundation species provide physical structure that enhances the diversity and abundance of associated organisms. Canopy-forming seaweeds are known to act as foundation species on rocky shores by lowering temperature and desiccation stress. Direct solar radiation, including ultraviolet (UV) light, can also reduce photosynthetic rates in algae, cause oxidative stress and DNA damage. The reduction in UV exposure provided by an algal canopy could therefore be important for understory organisms, including the red alga Chondrus crispus on New England's (USA) rocky shores, and this relationship may be more important at higher tidal elevations with increased low-tide exposure time. In field experiments, we investigated the relationship between tidal elevation and an index of C. crispus UV exposure, the concentration of UV-absorbing pigments. Low on the shore, C. crispus grew without a canopy. Higher on the shore, in the mid-intertidal zone, C. crispus was found under the canopy-forming rockweed, Fucus distichus subsp. evanescens. At this elevation, C. crispus was shaded (>50%; >1 m above MLLW). We performed a canopy removal experiment that spanned the mid-zone where C. crispus and F. distichus subsp. evanescens co-occur and the low-zone (no canopy). Following canopy removal in the mid-zone, UV pigment concentrations increased with tidal elevation. After accounting for the effect of elevation, removal of the algal canopy resulted in UV-protective pigment concentrations 2-fold higher than in un-manipulated control plots. These results suggest that amelioration of solar UV exposure might be another mechanism by which canopy seaweeds, acting as foundation species, facilitate understory seaweeds on rocky shores. SN - 1529-8817 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33314105/Intertidal_Canopy_forming_Seaweeds_Modulate_Understory_Seaweed_Photoprotective_Compounds_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.