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Resuscitation fluid types in sepsis, surgical, and trauma patients: a systematic review and sequential network meta-analyses.
Crit Care. 2020 12 14; 24(1):693.CC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Crystalloids and different component colloids, used for volume resuscitation, are sometimes associated with various adverse effects. Clinical trial findings for such fluid types in different patients' conditions are conflicting. Whether the mortality benefit of balanced crystalloid than saline can be inferred from sepsis to other patient group is uncertain, and adverse effect profile is not comprehensive. This study aims to compare the survival benefits and adverse effects of seven fluid types with network meta-analysis in sepsis, surgical, trauma, and traumatic brain injury patients.

METHODS

Searched databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL) and reference lists of relevant articles occurred from inception until January 2020. Studies on critically ill adults requiring fluid resuscitation were included. Intervention studies reported on balanced crystalloid, saline, iso-oncotic albumin, hyperoncotic albumin, low molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch (L-HES), high molecular weight HES, and gelatin. Network meta-analyses were conducted using random-effects model to calculate odds ratio (OR) and mean difference. Risk of Bias tool 2.0 was used to assess bias. Confidence in Network Meta-Analysis (CINeMA) web application was used to rate confidence in synthetic evidence.

RESULTS

Fifty-eight trials (n = 26,351 patients) were identified. Seven fluid types were evaluated. Among patients with sepsis and surgery, balanced crystalloids and albumin achieved better survival, fewer acute kidney injury, and smaller blood transfusion volumes than saline and L-HES. In those with sepsis, balanced crystalloids significantly reduced mortality more than saline (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.74-0.95) and L-HES (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.69-0.95) and reduced acute kidney injury more than L-HES (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.65-0.99). However, they required the greatest resuscitation volume among all fluid types, especially in trauma patients. In patients with traumatic brain injury, saline and L-HES achieved lower mortality than albumin and balanced crystalloids; especially saline was significantly superior to iso-oncotic albumin (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.87).

CONCLUSIONS

Our network meta-analysis found that balanced crystalloids and albumin decreased mortality more than L-HES and saline in sepsis patients; however, saline or L-HES was better than iso-oncotic albumin or balanced crystalloids in traumatic brain injury patients.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

PROSPERO website, registration number: CRD42018115641).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, National Taiwan University, Room 539, No. 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, 10055, Taiwan. Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan.Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan.Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Critical Care and Respiratory Therapy, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. College of Science, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan.Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, National Taiwan University, Room 539, No. 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, 10055, Taiwan.Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, National Taiwan University, Room 539, No. 17, Xu-Zhou Rd., Taipei, 10055, Taiwan. yukangtu@ntu.edu.tw. Department of Dentistry, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. yukangtu@ntu.edu.tw. Research Center of Big Data and Meta-Analysis, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. yukangtu@ntu.edu.tw.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33317590

Citation

Tseng, Chien-Hua, et al. "Resuscitation Fluid Types in Sepsis, Surgical, and Trauma Patients: a Systematic Review and Sequential Network Meta-analyses." Critical Care (London, England), vol. 24, no. 1, 2020, p. 693.
Tseng CH, Chen TT, Wu MY, et al. Resuscitation fluid types in sepsis, surgical, and trauma patients: a systematic review and sequential network meta-analyses. Crit Care. 2020;24(1):693.
Tseng, C. H., Chen, T. T., Wu, M. Y., Chan, M. C., Shih, M. C., & Tu, Y. K. (2020). Resuscitation fluid types in sepsis, surgical, and trauma patients: a systematic review and sequential network meta-analyses. Critical Care (London, England), 24(1), 693. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13054-020-03419-y
Tseng CH, et al. Resuscitation Fluid Types in Sepsis, Surgical, and Trauma Patients: a Systematic Review and Sequential Network Meta-analyses. Crit Care. 2020 12 14;24(1):693. PubMed PMID: 33317590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resuscitation fluid types in sepsis, surgical, and trauma patients: a systematic review and sequential network meta-analyses. AU - Tseng,Chien-Hua, AU - Chen,Tzu-Tao, AU - Wu,Mei-Yi, AU - Chan,Ming-Cheng, AU - Shih,Ming-Chieh, AU - Tu,Yu-Kang, Y1 - 2020/12/14/ PY - 2020/08/14/received PY - 2020/11/30/accepted PY - 2020/12/15/entrez PY - 2020/12/16/pubmed PY - 2021/7/28/medline KW - Colloids KW - Crystalloids KW - Fluid therapy KW - Intensive care KW - Resuscitation SP - 693 EP - 693 JF - Critical care (London, England) JO - Crit Care VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Crystalloids and different component colloids, used for volume resuscitation, are sometimes associated with various adverse effects. Clinical trial findings for such fluid types in different patients' conditions are conflicting. Whether the mortality benefit of balanced crystalloid than saline can be inferred from sepsis to other patient group is uncertain, and adverse effect profile is not comprehensive. This study aims to compare the survival benefits and adverse effects of seven fluid types with network meta-analysis in sepsis, surgical, trauma, and traumatic brain injury patients. METHODS: Searched databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL) and reference lists of relevant articles occurred from inception until January 2020. Studies on critically ill adults requiring fluid resuscitation were included. Intervention studies reported on balanced crystalloid, saline, iso-oncotic albumin, hyperoncotic albumin, low molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch (L-HES), high molecular weight HES, and gelatin. Network meta-analyses were conducted using random-effects model to calculate odds ratio (OR) and mean difference. Risk of Bias tool 2.0 was used to assess bias. Confidence in Network Meta-Analysis (CINeMA) web application was used to rate confidence in synthetic evidence. RESULTS: Fifty-eight trials (n = 26,351 patients) were identified. Seven fluid types were evaluated. Among patients with sepsis and surgery, balanced crystalloids and albumin achieved better survival, fewer acute kidney injury, and smaller blood transfusion volumes than saline and L-HES. In those with sepsis, balanced crystalloids significantly reduced mortality more than saline (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.74-0.95) and L-HES (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.69-0.95) and reduced acute kidney injury more than L-HES (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.65-0.99). However, they required the greatest resuscitation volume among all fluid types, especially in trauma patients. In patients with traumatic brain injury, saline and L-HES achieved lower mortality than albumin and balanced crystalloids; especially saline was significantly superior to iso-oncotic albumin (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.87). CONCLUSIONS: Our network meta-analysis found that balanced crystalloids and albumin decreased mortality more than L-HES and saline in sepsis patients; however, saline or L-HES was better than iso-oncotic albumin or balanced crystalloids in traumatic brain injury patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO website, registration number: CRD42018115641). SN - 1466-609X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33317590/Resuscitation_fluid_types_in_sepsis_surgical_and_trauma_patients:_a_systematic_review_and_sequential_network_meta_analyses_ L2 - https://ccforum.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13054-020-03419-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -