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Gluten-Free Breads: The Gap Between Research and Commercial Reality.
Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2019 May; 18(3):690-702.CR

Abstract

The market for gluten-free products is steadily growing and gluten-free bread (GFB) keeps on being one of the most challenging products to develop. Although numerous research studies have worked on improving the manufacture of GFBs, some have adopted approaches far from commercial reality. This review analyzes the ingredient list and nutrition facts of 228 commercially available GFBs produced by different brands around the world. The results from studying the ingredient list of breads revealed that commercial breads do not tend to use a single starchy source or gluten replacer, but a combination of several ingredients to optimize bread quality. Maize, tuber starches, and rice flour were the main starchy sources. Regarding hydrocolloids, the most often included ingredients were hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, xanthan and guar gum, and psyllium. Proteins and sugars were added, respectively, in 81% and 87% of the commercial breads analyzed. Furthermore, it was found that vegetable oils were preferred over fats. A long list of ingredients was observed in commercial GFBs, with the presence of a wide range of additives, including acidifiers, emulsifiers, leavening agents, preservatives, and aromas or flavorings. Meanwhile, nutrition facts showed a lower protein and higher fat content for GFBs compared to a gluten-containing counterpart, with small differences for salt and sugar. This research expands the current knowledge on GFB manufacturing, giving a panoramic outlook on the current situation in the GFB market, and helping both scientists and gluten-free companies unify/identify common trends.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Technology Area, College of Agricultural Engineering, Univ. of Valladolid, Palencia, 34004, Spain.Food Technology Area, College of Agricultural Engineering, Univ. of Valladolid, Palencia, 34004, Spain.Food Technology Area, College of Agricultural Engineering, Univ. of Valladolid, Palencia, 34004, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33336920

Citation

Roman, Laura, et al. "Gluten-Free Breads: the Gap Between Research and Commercial Reality." Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, vol. 18, no. 3, 2019, pp. 690-702.
Roman L, Belorio M, Gomez M. Gluten-Free Breads: The Gap Between Research and Commercial Reality. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2019;18(3):690-702.
Roman, L., Belorio, M., & Gomez, M. (2019). Gluten-Free Breads: The Gap Between Research and Commercial Reality. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, 18(3), 690-702. https://doi.org/10.1111/1541-4337.12437
Roman L, Belorio M, Gomez M. Gluten-Free Breads: the Gap Between Research and Commercial Reality. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2019;18(3):690-702. PubMed PMID: 33336920.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gluten-Free Breads: The Gap Between Research and Commercial Reality. AU - Roman,Laura, AU - Belorio,Mayara, AU - Gomez,Manuel, Y1 - 2019/03/28/ PY - 2018/11/06/received PY - 2019/02/04/revised PY - 2019/02/04/accepted PY - 2020/12/18/entrez PY - 2019/5/1/pubmed PY - 2019/5/1/medline KW - bread KW - commercial KW - composition KW - gluten-free KW - ingredients KW - market SP - 690 EP - 702 JF - Comprehensive reviews in food science and food safety JO - Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - The market for gluten-free products is steadily growing and gluten-free bread (GFB) keeps on being one of the most challenging products to develop. Although numerous research studies have worked on improving the manufacture of GFBs, some have adopted approaches far from commercial reality. This review analyzes the ingredient list and nutrition facts of 228 commercially available GFBs produced by different brands around the world. The results from studying the ingredient list of breads revealed that commercial breads do not tend to use a single starchy source or gluten replacer, but a combination of several ingredients to optimize bread quality. Maize, tuber starches, and rice flour were the main starchy sources. Regarding hydrocolloids, the most often included ingredients were hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, xanthan and guar gum, and psyllium. Proteins and sugars were added, respectively, in 81% and 87% of the commercial breads analyzed. Furthermore, it was found that vegetable oils were preferred over fats. A long list of ingredients was observed in commercial GFBs, with the presence of a wide range of additives, including acidifiers, emulsifiers, leavening agents, preservatives, and aromas or flavorings. Meanwhile, nutrition facts showed a lower protein and higher fat content for GFBs compared to a gluten-containing counterpart, with small differences for salt and sugar. This research expands the current knowledge on GFB manufacturing, giving a panoramic outlook on the current situation in the GFB market, and helping both scientists and gluten-free companies unify/identify common trends. SN - 1541-4337 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33336920/Gluten_Free_Breads:_The_Gap_Between_Research_and_Commercial_Reality_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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