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Irrational beliefs differentially predict adherence to guidelines and pseudoscientific practices during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Appl Cogn Psychol. 2020 Dec 07 [Online ahead of print]AC

Abstract

In the coronavirus "infodemic," people are exposed to official recommendations but also to potentially dangerous pseudoscientific advice claimed to protect against COVID-19. We examined whether irrational beliefs predict adherence to COVID-19 guidelines as well as susceptibility to such misinformation. Irrational beliefs were indexed by belief in COVID-19 conspiracy theories, COVID-19 knowledge overestimation, type I error cognitive biases, and cognitive intuition. Participants (N = 407) reported (1) how often they followed guidelines (e.g., handwashing, physical distancing), (2) how often they engaged in pseudoscientific practices (e.g., consuming garlic, colloidal silver), and (3) their intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Conspiratorial beliefs predicted all three outcomes in line with our expectations. Cognitive intuition and knowledge overestimation predicted lesser adherence to guidelines, while cognitive biases predicted greater adherence, but also greater use of pseudoscientific practices. Our results suggest an important relation between irrational beliefs and health behaviors, with conspiracy theories being the most detrimental.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty for Special Education and Rehabilitation University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia. Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.Laboratory for Research of Individual Differences, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia. Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33362344

Citation

Teovanović, Predrag, et al. "Irrational Beliefs Differentially Predict Adherence to Guidelines and Pseudoscientific Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic." Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2020.
Teovanović P, Lukić P, Zupan Z, et al. Irrational beliefs differentially predict adherence to guidelines and pseudoscientific practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Appl Cogn Psychol. 2020.
Teovanović, P., Lukić, P., Zupan, Z., Lazić, A., Ninković, M., & Žeželj, I. (2020). Irrational beliefs differentially predict adherence to guidelines and pseudoscientific practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Applied Cognitive Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3770
Teovanović P, et al. Irrational Beliefs Differentially Predict Adherence to Guidelines and Pseudoscientific Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Appl Cogn Psychol. 2020 Dec 7; PubMed PMID: 33362344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Irrational beliefs differentially predict adherence to guidelines and pseudoscientific practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. AU - Teovanović,Predrag, AU - Lukić,Petar, AU - Zupan,Zorana, AU - Lazić,Aleksandra, AU - Ninković,Milica, AU - Žeželj,Iris, Y1 - 2020/12/07/ PY - 2020/05/19/received PY - 2020/11/13/revised PY - 2020/11/21/accepted PY - 2020/12/28/entrez PY - 2020/12/29/pubmed PY - 2020/12/29/medline KW - COVID‐19 health behavior KW - cognitive biases KW - conspiracy theories KW - knowledge overestimation KW - pseudoscience JF - Applied cognitive psychology JO - Appl Cogn Psychol N2 - In the coronavirus "infodemic," people are exposed to official recommendations but also to potentially dangerous pseudoscientific advice claimed to protect against COVID-19. We examined whether irrational beliefs predict adherence to COVID-19 guidelines as well as susceptibility to such misinformation. Irrational beliefs were indexed by belief in COVID-19 conspiracy theories, COVID-19 knowledge overestimation, type I error cognitive biases, and cognitive intuition. Participants (N = 407) reported (1) how often they followed guidelines (e.g., handwashing, physical distancing), (2) how often they engaged in pseudoscientific practices (e.g., consuming garlic, colloidal silver), and (3) their intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Conspiratorial beliefs predicted all three outcomes in line with our expectations. Cognitive intuition and knowledge overestimation predicted lesser adherence to guidelines, while cognitive biases predicted greater adherence, but also greater use of pseudoscientific practices. Our results suggest an important relation between irrational beliefs and health behaviors, with conspiracy theories being the most detrimental. SN - 0888-4080 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33362344/Irrational_beliefs_differentially_predict_adherence_to_guidelines_and_pseudoscientific_practices_during_the_COVID-19_pandemic. L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/33362344/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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