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Clinically important respiratory effects of dust exposure and smoking in British coal miners.
Am Rev Respir Dis 1988; 137(1):106-12AR

Abstract

A unique data set of 3,380 British coal miners has been reanalyzed with major focus on nonpneumoconiotic respiratory conditions. The aim was to assess the independent contribution of smoking and exposure to respirable dust to clinically significant measures of respiratory dysfunction. Exposure to coal-mine dust was monitored over a 10-yr period. Medical surveys provided estimates of prior dust exposure and recorded respiratory symptoms. Each man's FEV1 was compared with the level predicted for his age and height by an internally derived prediction equation for FEV1. Four respiratory indices were considered at the end of the 10-yr period: FEV1 less than 80%, chronic bronchitis, chronic bronchitis with FEV1 less than 80%, and FEV1 less than 65%. Results were uniformly incorporated into logistic regression equations for each condition. The equations include coefficients for age, dust, and when indicated, an interaction term for age and dust. Dust-related increases in prevalence of each of the 4 conditions were statistically significant and were similar for smokers and nonsmokers at the mean age (47 yr). There was no evidence that smoking potentiates the effect of exposure to dust. Estimates of prevalences at the mean age of all 4 measures of respiratory dysfunction were greater in smokers. At intermediate and high dust exposure the prevalence of the 4 conditions in nonsmokers approached the prevalence in smokers at hypothetically zero dust exposure. Both smoking and dust exposure can cause clinically important respiratory dysfunction and their separate contributions to obstructive airway disease in coal miners appear to be additive.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80262.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3337449

Citation

Marine, W M., et al. "Clinically Important Respiratory Effects of Dust Exposure and Smoking in British Coal Miners." The American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol. 137, no. 1, 1988, pp. 106-12.
Marine WM, Gurr D, Jacobsen M. Clinically important respiratory effects of dust exposure and smoking in British coal miners. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988;137(1):106-12.
Marine, W. M., Gurr, D., & Jacobsen, M. (1988). Clinically important respiratory effects of dust exposure and smoking in British coal miners. The American Review of Respiratory Disease, 137(1), pp. 106-12.
Marine WM, Gurr D, Jacobsen M. Clinically Important Respiratory Effects of Dust Exposure and Smoking in British Coal Miners. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988;137(1):106-12. PubMed PMID: 3337449.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinically important respiratory effects of dust exposure and smoking in British coal miners. AU - Marine,W M, AU - Gurr,D, AU - Jacobsen,M, PY - 1988/1/1/pubmed PY - 1988/1/1/medline PY - 1988/1/1/entrez SP - 106 EP - 12 JF - The American review of respiratory disease JO - Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. VL - 137 IS - 1 N2 - A unique data set of 3,380 British coal miners has been reanalyzed with major focus on nonpneumoconiotic respiratory conditions. The aim was to assess the independent contribution of smoking and exposure to respirable dust to clinically significant measures of respiratory dysfunction. Exposure to coal-mine dust was monitored over a 10-yr period. Medical surveys provided estimates of prior dust exposure and recorded respiratory symptoms. Each man's FEV1 was compared with the level predicted for his age and height by an internally derived prediction equation for FEV1. Four respiratory indices were considered at the end of the 10-yr period: FEV1 less than 80%, chronic bronchitis, chronic bronchitis with FEV1 less than 80%, and FEV1 less than 65%. Results were uniformly incorporated into logistic regression equations for each condition. The equations include coefficients for age, dust, and when indicated, an interaction term for age and dust. Dust-related increases in prevalence of each of the 4 conditions were statistically significant and were similar for smokers and nonsmokers at the mean age (47 yr). There was no evidence that smoking potentiates the effect of exposure to dust. Estimates of prevalences at the mean age of all 4 measures of respiratory dysfunction were greater in smokers. At intermediate and high dust exposure the prevalence of the 4 conditions in nonsmokers approached the prevalence in smokers at hypothetically zero dust exposure. Both smoking and dust exposure can cause clinically important respiratory dysfunction and their separate contributions to obstructive airway disease in coal miners appear to be additive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0003-0805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3337449/Clinically_important_respiratory_effects_of_dust_exposure_and_smoking_in_British_coal_miners_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm/137.1.106?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -