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Contributions of malaria, helminths, HIV and iron deficiency to anaemia in pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic in SouthWest Nigeria.
Afr Health Sci. 2020 Sep; 20(3):1035-1044.AH

Abstract

Background

Iron deficiency is a dominant source of anaemia in many settings. To evaluate the key cause of anaemia in the study area, the prevalence of anaemia due to major public health diseases was compared with anaemia due to iron deficiency.

Methods

Pregnant women were recruited from ante-natal (n=490) and HIV clinics (n=217) with their personal data documented using a questionnaire. Microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick smears was used for detection of malaria parasites while helminths in stools were detected using direct smear method. Haematocrit values were determined by capillary method. Serum ferritin levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data was analysed using SPSS version 22.0.

Results

The mean age of the recruited women was 28.6±5.4 years old. There were 68.1% cases of anaemia of which 35.5% was due to infections only predominantly HIV and malaria, 14.9% from unknown sources while anaemia due to iron deficiency only was 7.1%.

Conclusion

It can safely be inferred that malaria and HIV predispose to anaemia than iron deficiency in the study area. Although pregnant women are dewormed and given IPTp for helminths and malaria treatment respectively, there should be complementary routine malaria screening at ANC visits for those with HCT values <33% and those infected with HIV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Institute for Advanced Medical Research and Training, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Department of Biological Sciences, Mountain Top University, Km 12, Lagos-Ibadan Expressway, Ogun State, Nigeria.Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.Institute for Advanced Medical Research and Training, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Department of Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria.Institute for Advanced Medical Research and Training, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.Immunology Unit, Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.Institute for Advanced Medical Research and Training, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33402949

Citation

Rabiu, Olawunmi R., et al. "Contributions of Malaria, Helminths, HIV and Iron Deficiency to Anaemia in Pregnant Women Attending Ante-natal Clinic in SouthWest Nigeria." African Health Sciences, vol. 20, no. 3, 2020, pp. 1035-1044.
Rabiu OR, Dada-Adegbola H, Kosoko AM, et al. Contributions of malaria, helminths, HIV and iron deficiency to anaemia in pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic in SouthWest Nigeria. Afr Health Sci. 2020;20(3):1035-1044.
Rabiu, O. R., Dada-Adegbola, H., Kosoko, A. M., Falade, C. O., Arinola, O. G., Odaibo, A. B., & Ademowo, O. G. (2020). Contributions of malaria, helminths, HIV and iron deficiency to anaemia in pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic in SouthWest Nigeria. African Health Sciences, 20(3), 1035-1044. https://doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v20i3.6
Rabiu OR, et al. Contributions of Malaria, Helminths, HIV and Iron Deficiency to Anaemia in Pregnant Women Attending Ante-natal Clinic in SouthWest Nigeria. Afr Health Sci. 2020;20(3):1035-1044. PubMed PMID: 33402949.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contributions of malaria, helminths, HIV and iron deficiency to anaemia in pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic in SouthWest Nigeria. AU - Rabiu,Olawunmi R, AU - Dada-Adegbola,Hannah, AU - Kosoko,Ayokulehin M, AU - Falade,Catherine O, AU - Arinola,Olatunbosun G, AU - Odaibo,Alexander B, AU - Ademowo,Olusegun G, PY - 2021/1/6/entrez PY - 2021/1/7/pubmed PY - 2021/3/12/medline KW - HIV KW - Iron deficiency anaemia KW - Plasmodium KW - antenatal care KW - helminth KW - pregnant women SP - 1035 EP - 1044 JF - African health sciences JO - Afr Health Sci VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - Background: Iron deficiency is a dominant source of anaemia in many settings. To evaluate the key cause of anaemia in the study area, the prevalence of anaemia due to major public health diseases was compared with anaemia due to iron deficiency. Methods: Pregnant women were recruited from ante-natal (n=490) and HIV clinics (n=217) with their personal data documented using a questionnaire. Microscopy of Giemsa-stained thick smears was used for detection of malaria parasites while helminths in stools were detected using direct smear method. Haematocrit values were determined by capillary method. Serum ferritin levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data was analysed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: The mean age of the recruited women was 28.6±5.4 years old. There were 68.1% cases of anaemia of which 35.5% was due to infections only predominantly HIV and malaria, 14.9% from unknown sources while anaemia due to iron deficiency only was 7.1%. Conclusion: It can safely be inferred that malaria and HIV predispose to anaemia than iron deficiency in the study area. Although pregnant women are dewormed and given IPTp for helminths and malaria treatment respectively, there should be complementary routine malaria screening at ANC visits for those with HCT values <33% and those infected with HIV. SN - 1729-0503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33402949/Contributions_of_malaria_helminths_HIV_and_iron_deficiency_to_anaemia_in_pregnant_women_attending_ante_natal_clinic_in_SouthWest_Nigeria_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/33402949/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -