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Intratracheally instillated diesel PM2.5 significantly altered the structure and composition of indigenous murine gut microbiota.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2021 Mar 01; 210:111903.EE

Abstract

A diverse and large community of gut microbiota reside in the intestinal tract of various organisms and play important roles in metabolism and immune homeostasis of its host. The disorders of microbiota-host interaction have been closely associated with numerous chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetes. The accumulating evidence has shown that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure contributes to the diabetes, atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel diseases; however, few studies have explored the impact of inhaled diesel PM2.5 on gut microbiota in vivo. In this study, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to diesel PM2.5 for 14 days via intratracheal instillation, and colon tissues and feces were harvested for microbiota analysis. Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we observed that intratracheally instillated diesel PM2.5 significantly altered the gut microbiota diversity and community. At the phylum and genus levels, principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated pronounced segregation of microbiota compositions, which were further confirmed by β diversity analysis. As the most affected phylum, Bacteroidetes was greatly diminished by diesel PM2.5. On the genus level, Escherichia, Parabacteroides, Akkermansia, and Oscillibacter were significantly elevated by diesel PM2.5 exposure. Our findings provided clear evidence that exposure to diesel PM2.5 via intratracheal instillation deteriorated the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and significantly altered the structure and composition of gut microbiota, which might subsequently contribute to the developmental abnormalities of inflammation, immunity and metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China; University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China; University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China; University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China.Key Laboratory of High Magnetic Field and Ion Beam Physical Biology, CAS; Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Pollution Control Technology, High Magnetic Field Laboratory of Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031, China; Institutes of Physical Science and Information Technology, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui 230601, China. Electronic address: anxu@ipp.ac.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33429322

Citation

Liu, Ying, et al. "Intratracheally Instillated Diesel PM2.5 Significantly Altered the Structure and Composition of Indigenous Murine Gut Microbiota." Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 210, 2021, p. 111903.
Liu Y, Wang T, Si B, et al. Intratracheally instillated diesel PM2.5 significantly altered the structure and composition of indigenous murine gut microbiota. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2021;210:111903.
Liu, Y., Wang, T., Si, B., Du, H., Liu, Y., Waqas, A., Huang, S., Zhao, G., Chen, S., & Xu, A. (2021). Intratracheally instillated diesel PM2.5 significantly altered the structure and composition of indigenous murine gut microbiota. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 210, 111903. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2021.111903
Liu Y, et al. Intratracheally Instillated Diesel PM2.5 Significantly Altered the Structure and Composition of Indigenous Murine Gut Microbiota. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2021 Mar 1;210:111903. PubMed PMID: 33429322.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intratracheally instillated diesel PM2.5 significantly altered the structure and composition of indigenous murine gut microbiota. AU - Liu,Ying, AU - Wang,Tong, AU - Si,Bo, AU - Du,Hua, AU - Liu,Yun, AU - Waqas,Ahmed, AU - Huang,Shengwei, AU - Zhao,Guoping, AU - Chen,Shaopeng, AU - Xu,An, Y1 - 2021/01/09/ PY - 2020/10/04/received PY - 2020/12/30/revised PY - 2021/01/04/accepted PY - 2021/1/12/pubmed PY - 2021/2/2/medline PY - 2021/1/11/entrez KW - Composition KW - Diesel PM(2.5) KW - Gut microbiota KW - Intratracheal instillation KW - Structure SP - 111903 EP - 111903 JF - Ecotoxicology and environmental safety JO - Ecotoxicol Environ Saf VL - 210 N2 - A diverse and large community of gut microbiota reside in the intestinal tract of various organisms and play important roles in metabolism and immune homeostasis of its host. The disorders of microbiota-host interaction have been closely associated with numerous chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetes. The accumulating evidence has shown that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure contributes to the diabetes, atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel diseases; however, few studies have explored the impact of inhaled diesel PM2.5 on gut microbiota in vivo. In this study, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to diesel PM2.5 for 14 days via intratracheal instillation, and colon tissues and feces were harvested for microbiota analysis. Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we observed that intratracheally instillated diesel PM2.5 significantly altered the gut microbiota diversity and community. At the phylum and genus levels, principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated pronounced segregation of microbiota compositions, which were further confirmed by β diversity analysis. As the most affected phylum, Bacteroidetes was greatly diminished by diesel PM2.5. On the genus level, Escherichia, Parabacteroides, Akkermansia, and Oscillibacter were significantly elevated by diesel PM2.5 exposure. Our findings provided clear evidence that exposure to diesel PM2.5 via intratracheal instillation deteriorated the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and significantly altered the structure and composition of gut microbiota, which might subsequently contribute to the developmental abnormalities of inflammation, immunity and metabolism. SN - 1090-2414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33429322/Intratracheally_instillated_diesel_PM2_5_significantly_altered_the_structure_and_composition_of_indigenous_murine_gut_microbiota_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147-6513(21)00014-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -