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Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) study: Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a randomized control trial of the MIND diet on cognitive decline.
Contemp Clin Trials. 2021 03; 102:106270.CC

Abstract

Alzheimer's dementia (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., with an estimated $305 billion cost of care in 2020. Currently there are no cures or therapies to ameliorate the disease progression and symptoms. Growing evidence links a diet characterized by high antioxidant components with benefits to cognitive function, which is indicative of the preventative potential of dietary inteventions. The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) study is a 3-year, multicenter, randomized controlled trial to test the effects of the MIND diet on cognitive function in 604 individuals at risk for AD. Men and women ages 65 to 84 years were recruited. Eligible participants were randomized to either the MIND diet with mild caloric restriction or their usual diet with mild caloric restriction. Cognitive assessments, medical history, blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, and blood and urine sample collections will be taken at baseline and follow-up visits. MRI scans will be completed on approximately half of the enrolled participants at the start and end of the study. Unique features of the MIND study include: 1) a dietary pattern, rather than single nutrient or food, tested in an at-risk population; 2) foods featured as key components of the MIND diet (i.e. extra-virgin olive oil, blueberries, and nuts) provided for participants; and 3) MRI scans of brain structure and volume that may provide potential mechanistic evidence on the effects of the diet. Results from the study will be crucial to the development of dietary guidelines for the prevention of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America.Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.Northwest Lipid Metabolism and Diabetes Research Laboratories, Seattle, WA, United States of America.Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Clinical Nutrition, Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Neurology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, United States of America.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America; Department of Neurology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America. Electronic address: Lisa_L_Barnes@rush.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33434704

Citation

Liu, Xiaoran, et al. "Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) Study: Rationale, Design and Baseline Characteristics of a Randomized Control Trial of the MIND Diet On Cognitive Decline." Contemporary Clinical Trials, vol. 102, 2021, p. 106270.
Liu X, Morris MC, Dhana K, et al. Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) study: Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a randomized control trial of the MIND diet on cognitive decline. Contemp Clin Trials. 2021;102:106270.
Liu, X., Morris, M. C., Dhana, K., Ventrelle, J., Johnson, K., Bishop, L., Hollings, C. S., Boulin, A., Laranjo, N., Stubbs, B. J., Reilly, X., Carey, V. J., Wang, Y., Furtado, J. D., Marcovina, S. M., Tangney, C., Aggarwal, N. T., Arfanakis, K., Sacks, F. M., & Barnes, L. L. (2021). Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) study: Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a randomized control trial of the MIND diet on cognitive decline. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 102, 106270. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2021.106270
Liu X, et al. Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) Study: Rationale, Design and Baseline Characteristics of a Randomized Control Trial of the MIND Diet On Cognitive Decline. Contemp Clin Trials. 2021;102:106270. PubMed PMID: 33434704.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) study: Rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a randomized control trial of the MIND diet on cognitive decline. AU - Liu,Xiaoran, AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Dhana,Klodian, AU - Ventrelle,Jennifer, AU - Johnson,Kathleen, AU - Bishop,Louise, AU - Hollings,Chiquia S, AU - Boulin,Adrianna, AU - Laranjo,Nancy, AU - Stubbs,Benjamin J, AU - Reilly,Xavier, AU - Carey,Vincent J, AU - Wang,Yamin, AU - Furtado,Jeremy D, AU - Marcovina,Santica M, AU - Tangney,Christy, AU - Aggarwal,Neelum T, AU - Arfanakis,Konstantinos, AU - Sacks,Frank M, AU - Barnes,Lisa L, Y1 - 2021/01/09/ PY - 2020/08/10/received PY - 2020/12/23/revised PY - 2021/01/03/accepted PY - 2021/1/13/pubmed PY - 2021/9/25/medline PY - 2021/1/12/entrez KW - Aging KW - Cognition KW - MIND diet KW - Nutrition KW - Randomized controlled trial KW - Study design KW - Study protocols SP - 106270 EP - 106270 JF - Contemporary clinical trials JO - Contemp Clin Trials VL - 102 N2 - Alzheimer's dementia (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., with an estimated $305 billion cost of care in 2020. Currently there are no cures or therapies to ameliorate the disease progression and symptoms. Growing evidence links a diet characterized by high antioxidant components with benefits to cognitive function, which is indicative of the preventative potential of dietary inteventions. The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) study is a 3-year, multicenter, randomized controlled trial to test the effects of the MIND diet on cognitive function in 604 individuals at risk for AD. Men and women ages 65 to 84 years were recruited. Eligible participants were randomized to either the MIND diet with mild caloric restriction or their usual diet with mild caloric restriction. Cognitive assessments, medical history, blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, and blood and urine sample collections will be taken at baseline and follow-up visits. MRI scans will be completed on approximately half of the enrolled participants at the start and end of the study. Unique features of the MIND study include: 1) a dietary pattern, rather than single nutrient or food, tested in an at-risk population; 2) foods featured as key components of the MIND diet (i.e. extra-virgin olive oil, blueberries, and nuts) provided for participants; and 3) MRI scans of brain structure and volume that may provide potential mechanistic evidence on the effects of the diet. Results from the study will be crucial to the development of dietary guidelines for the prevention of AD. SN - 1559-2030 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33434704/Mediterranean_DASH_Intervention_for_Neurodegenerative_Delay__MIND__study:_Rationale_design_and_baseline_characteristics_of_a_randomized_control_trial_of_the_MIND_diet_on_cognitive_decline_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1551-7144(21)00006-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -