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As the Pandemic Progresses, How Does Willingness to Vaccinate against COVID-19 Evolve?
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Jan 19; 18(2)IJ

Abstract

Controversy around the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines may lead to low vaccination rates. Survey data were collected in April and August 2020 from a total of 2343 Australian adults. A quarter (n = 575, 24%) completed both surveys. A generalized linear mixed model analysis was conducted to determine whether willingness to vaccinate changed in the repeated sample, and a multinominal logistic regression was conducted in all participants to determine whether willingness to vaccinate was associated with demographics, chronic disease, or media use. Willingness to vaccinate slightly decreased between April (87%) and August (85%) but this was not significant. Willingness to vaccinate was lower in people with a certificate or diploma (79%) compared to those with a Bachelor degree (87%), p < 0.01 and lower in infrequent users of traditional media (78%) compared to frequent users of traditional media (89%), p < 0.001. Women were more likely to be unsure if they would be willing to vaccinate (10%) compared to men (7%), p < 0.01. There were no associations between willingness to vaccinate and age, chronic disease, or social media use. Promotion of a COVID-19 vaccine should consider targeting women, and people with a certificate or diploma, via non-traditional media channels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Cluster for Resilience and Wellbeing, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, 6 University Drive, Branyan, QLD 4670, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia.School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Building 7, Central Queensland University, Bruce Highway, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, 44 Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5043, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33477825

Citation

Alley, Stephanie J., et al. "As the Pandemic Progresses, How Does Willingness to Vaccinate Against COVID-19 Evolve?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 2, 2021.
Alley SJ, Stanton R, Browne M, et al. As the Pandemic Progresses, How Does Willingness to Vaccinate against COVID-19 Evolve? Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18(2).
Alley, S. J., Stanton, R., Browne, M., To, Q. G., Khalesi, S., Williams, S. L., Thwaite, T. L., Fenning, A. S., & Vandelanotte, C. (2021). As the Pandemic Progresses, How Does Willingness to Vaccinate against COVID-19 Evolve? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(2). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020797
Alley SJ, et al. As the Pandemic Progresses, How Does Willingness to Vaccinate Against COVID-19 Evolve. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Jan 19;18(2) PubMed PMID: 33477825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - As the Pandemic Progresses, How Does Willingness to Vaccinate against COVID-19 Evolve? AU - Alley,Stephanie J, AU - Stanton,Robert, AU - Browne,Matthew, AU - To,Quyen G, AU - Khalesi,Saman, AU - Williams,Susan L, AU - Thwaite,Tanya L, AU - Fenning,Andrew S, AU - Vandelanotte,Corneel, Y1 - 2021/01/19/ PY - 2020/12/03/received PY - 2021/01/12/revised PY - 2021/01/14/accepted PY - 2021/1/22/entrez PY - 2021/1/23/pubmed PY - 2021/1/27/medline KW - COVID KW - acceptance KW - coronavirus KW - demographics KW - hesitancy KW - time JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 18 IS - 2 N2 - Controversy around the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines may lead to low vaccination rates. Survey data were collected in April and August 2020 from a total of 2343 Australian adults. A quarter (n = 575, 24%) completed both surveys. A generalized linear mixed model analysis was conducted to determine whether willingness to vaccinate changed in the repeated sample, and a multinominal logistic regression was conducted in all participants to determine whether willingness to vaccinate was associated with demographics, chronic disease, or media use. Willingness to vaccinate slightly decreased between April (87%) and August (85%) but this was not significant. Willingness to vaccinate was lower in people with a certificate or diploma (79%) compared to those with a Bachelor degree (87%), p < 0.01 and lower in infrequent users of traditional media (78%) compared to frequent users of traditional media (89%), p < 0.001. Women were more likely to be unsure if they would be willing to vaccinate (10%) compared to men (7%), p < 0.01. There were no associations between willingness to vaccinate and age, chronic disease, or social media use. Promotion of a COVID-19 vaccine should consider targeting women, and people with a certificate or diploma, via non-traditional media channels. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33477825/As_the_Pandemic_Progresses_How_Does_Willingness_to_Vaccinate_against_COVID_19_Evolve DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -