Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Health in Older Adults: Findings from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study.
J Nutr Health Aging. 2021; 25(2):255-262.JN

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Systematic reviews report dietary patterns may be associated with cognitive health in older adults. However, inconsistent findings have been reported and relevant research lacks large scale studies. This study aims to examine the associations of dietary patterns and cognitive function among older adults in an Australian ageing cohort.

DESIGN

A population-based, cross-sectional analysis of the baseline phase of the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study, a well-characterised Australian ageing study.

SETTING

The Sydney Memory and Ageing Study was initiated in 2005 to examine the clinical characteristics and prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

PARTICIPANTS

Non-demented community-dwelling individuals from English-speaking background (N = 819) aged 70-90 recruited from two areas of Sydney, following a random approach to 8914 individuals on the electoral roll in the Sydney Memory and Ageing study.

MEASUREMENTS

The Cancer Council of Victoria Food Frequency Questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. Scores for Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and the Dietary Guidelines Index (DGI 2013) were generated. Two patterns - a Prudent healthy and a Western dietary pattern - were derived using principal components analysis (PCA). Neuropsychological tests were used to assess global cognition and six cognitive domains. Multivariate linear modelling assessed the relationship between dietary patterns and cognitive domain scores.

RESULTS

Mediterranean diet and DASH diet were both positively linked to visuospatial cognition (P=0.002 and P=0.001 respectively). Higher intake of legumes and nuts was related to better performance in global cognition (β=0.117; 95% CI:0.052, 0.181; P<0.001) and language and visuospatial cognitive domains. The Prudent healthy diet was associated with better global cognition (β=0.307; 95% CI: 0.053, 0.562; P=0.019) in women and a Western diet was related to poorer global function (β=-0.242; 95% CI: -0.451,-0.034; P=0.023) and executive function (β=-0.325; 95% CI: -0.552,-0.099; P=0.005) in men.

CONCLUSION

In this analysis, higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet, DASH diet, Prudent healthy diet and greater consumption of legumes and nuts were associated with better cognition among older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Professor Henry Brodaty, Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration, School of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, the University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia. Tel.: +61-2-9385-2585; E-mail: h.brodaty@unsw.edu.au.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33491042

Citation

Chen, X, et al. "Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Health in Older Adults: Findings From the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study." The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, vol. 25, no. 2, 2021, pp. 255-262.
Chen X, Liu Z, Sachdev PS, et al. Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Health in Older Adults: Findings from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. J Nutr Health Aging. 2021;25(2):255-262.
Chen, X., Liu, Z., Sachdev, P. S., Kochan, N. A., O'Leary, F., & Brodaty, H. (2021). Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Health in Older Adults: Findings from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 25(2), 255-262. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-020-1536-8
Chen X, et al. Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Health in Older Adults: Findings From the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. J Nutr Health Aging. 2021;25(2):255-262. PubMed PMID: 33491042.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Patterns and Cognitive Health in Older Adults: Findings from the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. AU - Chen,X, AU - Liu,Z, AU - Sachdev,P S, AU - Kochan,N A, AU - O'Leary,F, AU - Brodaty,H, PY - 2021/1/25/entrez PY - 2021/1/26/pubmed PY - 2021/1/26/medline KW - Cognitive health KW - dietary pattern KW - nutrition SP - 255 EP - 262 JF - The journal of nutrition, health & aging JO - J Nutr Health Aging VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Systematic reviews report dietary patterns may be associated with cognitive health in older adults. However, inconsistent findings have been reported and relevant research lacks large scale studies. This study aims to examine the associations of dietary patterns and cognitive function among older adults in an Australian ageing cohort. DESIGN: A population-based, cross-sectional analysis of the baseline phase of the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study, a well-characterised Australian ageing study. SETTING: The Sydney Memory and Ageing Study was initiated in 2005 to examine the clinical characteristics and prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). PARTICIPANTS: Non-demented community-dwelling individuals from English-speaking background (N = 819) aged 70-90 recruited from two areas of Sydney, following a random approach to 8914 individuals on the electoral roll in the Sydney Memory and Ageing study. MEASUREMENTS: The Cancer Council of Victoria Food Frequency Questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. Scores for Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and the Dietary Guidelines Index (DGI 2013) were generated. Two patterns - a Prudent healthy and a Western dietary pattern - were derived using principal components analysis (PCA). Neuropsychological tests were used to assess global cognition and six cognitive domains. Multivariate linear modelling assessed the relationship between dietary patterns and cognitive domain scores. RESULTS: Mediterranean diet and DASH diet were both positively linked to visuospatial cognition (P=0.002 and P=0.001 respectively). Higher intake of legumes and nuts was related to better performance in global cognition (β=0.117; 95% CI:0.052, 0.181; P<0.001) and language and visuospatial cognitive domains. The Prudent healthy diet was associated with better global cognition (β=0.307; 95% CI: 0.053, 0.562; P=0.019) in women and a Western diet was related to poorer global function (β=-0.242; 95% CI: -0.451,-0.034; P=0.023) and executive function (β=-0.325; 95% CI: -0.552,-0.099; P=0.005) in men. CONCLUSION: In this analysis, higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet, DASH diet, Prudent healthy diet and greater consumption of legumes and nuts were associated with better cognition among older adults. SN - 1760-4788 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33491042/Dietary_Patterns_and_Cognitive_Health_in_Older_Adults:_Findings_from_the_Sydney_Memory_and_Ageing_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-020-1536-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.