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Examining Australian public perceptions and behaviors towards a future COVID-19 vaccine.
BMC Infect Dis. 2021 Jan 28; 21(1):120.BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

As immunisation program launches have previously demonstrated, it is essential that careful planning occurs now to ensure the readiness of the public for a COVID-19 vaccine. As part of that process, this study aimed to understand the public perceptions regarding a future COVID-19 vaccine in Australia.

METHODS

A national cross-sectional online survey of 1420 Australian adults (18 years and older) was undertaken between 18 and 24 March 2020. The statistical analysis of the data included univariate and multivariable logistic regression model analysis.

RESULTS

Respondents generally held positive views towards vaccination. Eighty percent (n = 1143) agreed with the statement that getting myself vaccinated for COVID-19 would be a good way to protect myself against infection. Females (n = 614, 83%) were more likely to agree with the statement than males (n = 529, 78%) (aOR = 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8); P = 0.03), while 91% of those aged 70 years and above agreed compared to 76% of 18-29-year-olds (aOR = 2.3 (95% CI:1.2-4.1); P = 0.008). Agreement was also higher for those with a self-reported chronic disease (aOR = 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-2.0); P = 0.04) and among those who held private health insurance (aOR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3-2.3); P < 0.001). Beyond individual perceptions, 78% stated that their decision to vaccinate would be supported by family and friends.

CONCLUSION

This study presents an early indication of public perceptions towards a future COVID-19 vaccine and represents a starting point for mapping vaccine perceptions. To support an effective launch of these new vaccines, governments need to use this time to understand the communities concerns and to identify the strategies that will support engagement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medicine, School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Level 2, Samuels Building, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. h.seale@unsw.edu.au.Faculty of Medicine, School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Level 2, Samuels Building, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia.Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, Kids Research, Sydney Children's Hospitals Network, Westmead, NSW, Australia.National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University, Acton, ACT, Canberra, Australia.School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Wallsend, NSW, Australia.National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, Kids Research, Sydney Children's Hospitals Network, Westmead, NSW, Australia. School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Wallsend, NSW, Australia.Office of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Office of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33509104

Citation

Seale, Holly, et al. "Examining Australian Public Perceptions and Behaviors Towards a Future COVID-19 Vaccine." BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 21, no. 1, 2021, p. 120.
Seale H, Heywood AE, Leask J, et al. Examining Australian public perceptions and behaviors towards a future COVID-19 vaccine. BMC Infect Dis. 2021;21(1):120.
Seale, H., Heywood, A. E., Leask, J., Sheel, M., Durrheim, D. N., Bolsewicz, K., & Kaur, R. (2021). Examining Australian public perceptions and behaviors towards a future COVID-19 vaccine. BMC Infectious Diseases, 21(1), 120. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-021-05833-1
Seale H, et al. Examining Australian Public Perceptions and Behaviors Towards a Future COVID-19 Vaccine. BMC Infect Dis. 2021 Jan 28;21(1):120. PubMed PMID: 33509104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Examining Australian public perceptions and behaviors towards a future COVID-19 vaccine. AU - Seale,Holly, AU - Heywood,Anita E, AU - Leask,Julie, AU - Sheel,Meru, AU - Durrheim,David N, AU - Bolsewicz,Katarzyna, AU - Kaur,Rajneesh, Y1 - 2021/01/28/ PY - 2020/10/01/received PY - 2021/01/22/accepted PY - 2021/1/29/entrez PY - 2021/1/30/pubmed PY - 2021/1/30/medline KW - Acceptance KW - Attitudes KW - COVID-19 KW - Communication KW - Immunisation KW - Pandemic KW - Vaccination decisions SP - 120 EP - 120 JF - BMC infectious diseases JO - BMC Infect Dis VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: As immunisation program launches have previously demonstrated, it is essential that careful planning occurs now to ensure the readiness of the public for a COVID-19 vaccine. As part of that process, this study aimed to understand the public perceptions regarding a future COVID-19 vaccine in Australia. METHODS: A national cross-sectional online survey of 1420 Australian adults (18 years and older) was undertaken between 18 and 24 March 2020. The statistical analysis of the data included univariate and multivariable logistic regression model analysis. RESULTS: Respondents generally held positive views towards vaccination. Eighty percent (n = 1143) agreed with the statement that getting myself vaccinated for COVID-19 would be a good way to protect myself against infection. Females (n = 614, 83%) were more likely to agree with the statement than males (n = 529, 78%) (aOR = 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8); P = 0.03), while 91% of those aged 70 years and above agreed compared to 76% of 18-29-year-olds (aOR = 2.3 (95% CI:1.2-4.1); P = 0.008). Agreement was also higher for those with a self-reported chronic disease (aOR = 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-2.0); P = 0.04) and among those who held private health insurance (aOR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3-2.3); P < 0.001). Beyond individual perceptions, 78% stated that their decision to vaccinate would be supported by family and friends. CONCLUSION: This study presents an early indication of public perceptions towards a future COVID-19 vaccine and represents a starting point for mapping vaccine perceptions. To support an effective launch of these new vaccines, governments need to use this time to understand the communities concerns and to identify the strategies that will support engagement. SN - 1471-2334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33509104/Examining_Australian_public_perceptions_and_behaviors_towards_a_future_COVID_19_vaccine_ L2 - https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-021-05833-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -