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Positive Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on Long-Term Breastfeeding Rates, Growth, and Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants.
Breastfeed Med. 2021 04; 16(4):282-291.BM

Abstract

Background and Objectives:

Kangaroo mother care (KMC) benefits preterm infants' health through increasing breastfeeding, but the longitudinal effects of KMC remain unknown. This study investigates the impact of KMC on breastfeeding and health outcomes in Chinese preterm infants.

Methods:

A longitudinal randomized controlled study was conducted with 79 preterm infant-mother dyads. The KMC group (n = 36) was provided 2.5 hours/day KMC during the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, while the control group (n = 43) received standard care. Infant's feeding regimens and physical growth were documented daily at NICU. Physical growth and Neonatal Behavioral Neurological Assessment were measured at 40 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months of corrected age (CA). Breastfeeding outcomes were documented at 6 months of CA.

Results:

Compared with the control group, KMC infants received higher mothers' milk proportion during hospitalization (B = 0.16, confidence interval [CI] = [0.11-0.21]) and less feeding intolerance at discharge (odds ratio [OR] = 0.11, CI = [0.02-0.43]); and higher exclusive breastfeeding proportion (OR = 14.6, CI = [3.5-60.9]) at 6 months CA. KMC infants also had significant increased body weight and body length at hospital discharge; and more increases of body weight, body length, and head circumference in follow-ups. The neurobehavioral score was also higher in the KMC group compared to the control group over time.

Conclusions:

Longitudinal KMC effects are significant in promoting preterm infants' breastfeeding outcomes, growth, and neurodevelopment. Early initiation of KMC practice is highly recommended to the parent-infant population in Chinese NICUs to promote breastfeeding and developmental outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.Department of Statistics; University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.Department of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33533688

Citation

Wang, Ying, et al. "Positive Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care On Long-Term Breastfeeding Rates, Growth, and Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants." Breastfeeding Medicine : the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, vol. 16, no. 4, 2021, pp. 282-291.
Wang Y, Zhao T, Zhang Y, et al. Positive Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on Long-Term Breastfeeding Rates, Growth, and Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants. Breastfeed Med. 2021;16(4):282-291.
Wang, Y., Zhao, T., Zhang, Y., Li, S., & Cong, X. (2021). Positive Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on Long-Term Breastfeeding Rates, Growth, and Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants. Breastfeeding Medicine : the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, 16(4), 282-291. https://doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2020.0358
Wang Y, et al. Positive Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care On Long-Term Breastfeeding Rates, Growth, and Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants. Breastfeed Med. 2021;16(4):282-291. PubMed PMID: 33533688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Positive Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care on Long-Term Breastfeeding Rates, Growth, and Neurodevelopment in Preterm Infants. AU - Wang,Ying, AU - Zhao,Tingting, AU - Zhang,Yiming, AU - Li,Siying, AU - Cong,Xiaomei, Y1 - 2021/02/02/ PY - 2021/2/4/pubmed PY - 2021/8/17/medline PY - 2021/2/3/entrez KW - breastfeeding KW - feeding intolerance KW - kangaroo mother care KW - neurobehavioral outcomes KW - physical growth KW - preterm infants SP - 282 EP - 291 JF - Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine JO - Breastfeed Med VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - Background and Objectives: Kangaroo mother care (KMC) benefits preterm infants' health through increasing breastfeeding, but the longitudinal effects of KMC remain unknown. This study investigates the impact of KMC on breastfeeding and health outcomes in Chinese preterm infants. Methods: A longitudinal randomized controlled study was conducted with 79 preterm infant-mother dyads. The KMC group (n = 36) was provided 2.5 hours/day KMC during the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, while the control group (n = 43) received standard care. Infant's feeding regimens and physical growth were documented daily at NICU. Physical growth and Neonatal Behavioral Neurological Assessment were measured at 40 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months of corrected age (CA). Breastfeeding outcomes were documented at 6 months of CA. Results: Compared with the control group, KMC infants received higher mothers' milk proportion during hospitalization (B = 0.16, confidence interval [CI] = [0.11-0.21]) and less feeding intolerance at discharge (odds ratio [OR] = 0.11, CI = [0.02-0.43]); and higher exclusive breastfeeding proportion (OR = 14.6, CI = [3.5-60.9]) at 6 months CA. KMC infants also had significant increased body weight and body length at hospital discharge; and more increases of body weight, body length, and head circumference in follow-ups. The neurobehavioral score was also higher in the KMC group compared to the control group over time. Conclusions: Longitudinal KMC effects are significant in promoting preterm infants' breastfeeding outcomes, growth, and neurodevelopment. Early initiation of KMC practice is highly recommended to the parent-infant population in Chinese NICUs to promote breastfeeding and developmental outcomes. SN - 1556-8342 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33533688/Positive_Effects_of_Kangaroo_Mother_Care_on_Long_Term_Breastfeeding_Rates_Growth_and_Neurodevelopment_in_Preterm_Infants_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/bfm.2020.0358?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -