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Mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulation: In pursuit of controlling COVID-19 related cytokine storm.
Stem Cells. 2021 06; 39(6):707-722.SC

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has grown to be a global public health crisis with no safe and effective treatments available yet. Recent findings suggest that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the coronavirus pathogen that causes COVID-19, could elicit a cytokine storm that drives edema, dysfunction of the airway exchange, and acute respiratory distress syndrome in the lung, followed by acute cardiac injury and thromboembolic events leading to multiorgan failure and death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), owing to their powerful immunomodulatory abilities, have the potential to attenuate the cytokine storm and have therefore been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach for which several clinical trials are underway. Given that intravenous infusion of MSCs results in a significant trapping in the lung, MSC therapy could directly mitigate inflammation, protect alveolar epithelial cells, and reverse lung dysfunction by normalizing the pulmonary microenvironment and preventing pulmonary fibrosis. In this review, we present an overview and perspectives of the SARS-CoV-2 induced inflammatory dysfunction and the potential of MSC immunomodulation for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 related pulmonary disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medicine, A.O.U.I. Policlinico G.B. Rossi & University of Verona, Verona, Italy.Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Laboratory of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.Laboratory of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.Laboratory of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging (CSTI), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33586320

Citation

Song, Na, et al. "Mesenchymal Stem Cell Immunomodulation: in Pursuit of Controlling COVID-19 Related Cytokine Storm." Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio), vol. 39, no. 6, 2021, pp. 707-722.
Song N, Wakimoto H, Rossignoli F, et al. Mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulation: In pursuit of controlling COVID-19 related cytokine storm. Stem Cells. 2021;39(6):707-722.
Song, N., Wakimoto, H., Rossignoli, F., Bhere, D., Ciccocioppo, R., Chen, K. S., Khalsa, J. K., Mastrolia, I., Samarelli, A. V., Dominici, M., & Shah, K. (2021). Mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulation: In pursuit of controlling COVID-19 related cytokine storm. Stem Cells (Dayton, Ohio), 39(6), 707-722. https://doi.org/10.1002/stem.3354
Song N, et al. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Immunomodulation: in Pursuit of Controlling COVID-19 Related Cytokine Storm. Stem Cells. 2021;39(6):707-722. PubMed PMID: 33586320.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulation: In pursuit of controlling COVID-19 related cytokine storm. AU - Song,Na, AU - Wakimoto,Hiroaki, AU - Rossignoli,Filippo, AU - Bhere,Deepak, AU - Ciccocioppo,Rachele, AU - Chen,Kok-Siong, AU - Khalsa,Jasneet Kaur, AU - Mastrolia,Ilenia, AU - Samarelli,Anna Valeria, AU - Dominici,Massimo, AU - Shah,Khalid, Y1 - 2021/03/07/ PY - 2020/11/08/received PY - 2021/01/26/accepted PY - 2021/2/16/pubmed PY - 2021/6/1/medline PY - 2021/2/15/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - coronavirus KW - cytokine storm KW - immunomodulation KW - mesenchymal stem cells SP - 707 EP - 722 JF - Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio) JO - Stem Cells VL - 39 IS - 6 N2 - The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has grown to be a global public health crisis with no safe and effective treatments available yet. Recent findings suggest that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the coronavirus pathogen that causes COVID-19, could elicit a cytokine storm that drives edema, dysfunction of the airway exchange, and acute respiratory distress syndrome in the lung, followed by acute cardiac injury and thromboembolic events leading to multiorgan failure and death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), owing to their powerful immunomodulatory abilities, have the potential to attenuate the cytokine storm and have therefore been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach for which several clinical trials are underway. Given that intravenous infusion of MSCs results in a significant trapping in the lung, MSC therapy could directly mitigate inflammation, protect alveolar epithelial cells, and reverse lung dysfunction by normalizing the pulmonary microenvironment and preventing pulmonary fibrosis. In this review, we present an overview and perspectives of the SARS-CoV-2 induced inflammatory dysfunction and the potential of MSC immunomodulation for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 related pulmonary disease. SN - 1549-4918 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33586320/Mesenchymal_stem_cell_immunomodulation:_In_pursuit_of_controlling_COVID_19_related_cytokine_storm_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/stmcls/article-lookup/doi/10.1002/stem.3354 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -