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Effect of robot-assisted gait training on gait automaticity in Parkinson disease: A prospective, open-label, single-arm, pilot study.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2021 Feb 05; 100(5):e24348.M

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Gait automaticity is reduced in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) due to impaired habitual control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) on gait automaticity as well as gait speed and balance in patients with PD.This study was a prospective, open-label, single-arm, pilot study. We planned to recruit 12 patients with idiopathic PD. Participants received 12 sessions of RAGT using exoskeleton-type robotic device. Sessions were 45-minute each, 3 days a week, for 4 consecutive weeks using an exoskeleton-type gait robot. The primary outcome was the percentage of dual-task interference measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) under single and dual-task (cognitive and physical) conditions. Secondary outcomes were the Berg Balance Scale and Korean version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International. All measures were evaluated before treatment (T0), after treatment (T1), and 1-month post-treatment (T2).Twelve patients were enrolled and 1 dropped out. Finally, 11 patients with idiopathic PD were analyzed. The mean age of 11 patients (5 males) was 66.46 ± 5.66 years, and disease duration was 112.91 ± 50.19 months. The Hoehn and Yahr stages were 2.5 in 8 patients and 3 in 3 patients. Linear mixed-effect model analysis showed a significant change over time only in single-task gait speed of the 10MWT (P = .007), but not in dual-task gait speed, dual-task interferences, and Korean version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International. Cognitive dual-task interference significantly increased (P = .026) at T1, but not at T2 (P = .203). No significant changes were observed for physical dual-task interference at T1 and T2. Single-task gait speed of the 10MWT was significantly increased at T1 (P = .041), but not at T2 (P = .445). There were no significant changes in the dual-task gait speed of 10MWT. A significant improvement was observed in Berg Balance Scale score at T1 and T2 (P = .004 and P = .024, respectively).In this pilot study, despite improvement in walking speed and balance, gait automaticity in patients with PD was not improved by RAGT using an exoskeleton-type robot. Additional therapeutic components may be needed to improve gait automaticity using RAGT in patients with PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital.Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33592882

Citation

Yun, Seo Jung, et al. "Effect of Robot-assisted Gait Training On Gait Automaticity in Parkinson Disease: a Prospective, Open-label, Single-arm, Pilot Study." Medicine, vol. 100, no. 5, 2021, pp. e24348.
Yun SJ, Lee HH, Lee WH, et al. Effect of robot-assisted gait training on gait automaticity in Parkinson disease: A prospective, open-label, single-arm, pilot study. Medicine (Baltimore). 2021;100(5):e24348.
Yun, S. J., Lee, H. H., Lee, W. H., Lee, S. H., Oh, B. M., & Seo, H. G. (2021). Effect of robot-assisted gait training on gait automaticity in Parkinson disease: A prospective, open-label, single-arm, pilot study. Medicine, 100(5), e24348. https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000024348
Yun SJ, et al. Effect of Robot-assisted Gait Training On Gait Automaticity in Parkinson Disease: a Prospective, Open-label, Single-arm, Pilot Study. Medicine (Baltimore). 2021 Feb 5;100(5):e24348. PubMed PMID: 33592882.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of robot-assisted gait training on gait automaticity in Parkinson disease: A prospective, open-label, single-arm, pilot study. AU - Yun,Seo Jung, AU - Lee,Hyun Haeng, AU - Lee,Woo Hyung, AU - Lee,Seung Hak, AU - Oh,Byung-Mo, AU - Seo,Han Gil, PY - 2019/09/10/received PY - 2020/12/27/accepted PY - 2021/2/17/entrez PY - 2021/2/18/pubmed PY - 2021/2/24/medline SP - e24348 EP - e24348 JF - Medicine JO - Medicine (Baltimore) VL - 100 IS - 5 N2 - ABSTRACT: Gait automaticity is reduced in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) due to impaired habitual control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) on gait automaticity as well as gait speed and balance in patients with PD.This study was a prospective, open-label, single-arm, pilot study. We planned to recruit 12 patients with idiopathic PD. Participants received 12 sessions of RAGT using exoskeleton-type robotic device. Sessions were 45-minute each, 3 days a week, for 4 consecutive weeks using an exoskeleton-type gait robot. The primary outcome was the percentage of dual-task interference measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) under single and dual-task (cognitive and physical) conditions. Secondary outcomes were the Berg Balance Scale and Korean version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International. All measures were evaluated before treatment (T0), after treatment (T1), and 1-month post-treatment (T2).Twelve patients were enrolled and 1 dropped out. Finally, 11 patients with idiopathic PD were analyzed. The mean age of 11 patients (5 males) was 66.46 ± 5.66 years, and disease duration was 112.91 ± 50.19 months. The Hoehn and Yahr stages were 2.5 in 8 patients and 3 in 3 patients. Linear mixed-effect model analysis showed a significant change over time only in single-task gait speed of the 10MWT (P = .007), but not in dual-task gait speed, dual-task interferences, and Korean version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International. Cognitive dual-task interference significantly increased (P = .026) at T1, but not at T2 (P = .203). No significant changes were observed for physical dual-task interference at T1 and T2. Single-task gait speed of the 10MWT was significantly increased at T1 (P = .041), but not at T2 (P = .445). There were no significant changes in the dual-task gait speed of 10MWT. A significant improvement was observed in Berg Balance Scale score at T1 and T2 (P = .004 and P = .024, respectively).In this pilot study, despite improvement in walking speed and balance, gait automaticity in patients with PD was not improved by RAGT using an exoskeleton-type robot. Additional therapeutic components may be needed to improve gait automaticity using RAGT in patients with PD. SN - 1536-5964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33592882/Effect_of_robot_assisted_gait_training_on_gait_automaticity_in_Parkinson_disease:_A_prospective_open_label_single_arm_pilot_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -