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Hyperhomocysteinemia and its relations to conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in adult Nigerians: the REMAH study.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2021 02 18; 21(1):102.BC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence linking homocysteine (Hcy) with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) or its risk factors are limited in a sub-Saharan black population.

OBJECTIVE

We set out to evaluate the association between Hcy and hypertension and other CVD risk factors in a population of adult Nigerians.

METHODS

Data of 156 adults aged 18-70 years was accessed from the North Central study site of the REmoving the MAsk on Hypertension (REMAH) study. Homocysteine, blood glucose and lipid profile in whole blood/serum were measured using standard laboratory methods. Hypertension was diagnosed if average of 5 consecutive blood pressure (BP) measurements obtained using a mercury sphygmomanometer was equal to or higher than 140 systolic and/or 90 mmHg diastolic or the individual is on antihypertensive medication. Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) was defined as Hcy > 10 µmol/L.

RESULTS

Of the 156 participants, 72 (43.5%) were hypertensive, of whom 18 had HHcy. Subjects with HHcy were significantly (p < 0.05) older (41.5 vs. 40.6yrs), had lower HDL-cholesterol (0.6 vs. 0.8 mmol/L) and higher systolic (145.5 vs. 126.0 mmHg) and diastolic BP (92.9 vs. 79.6 mmHg), compared to those without HHcy. Intake of alcohol and a 1 yr increase in age were respectively and significantly (p < 0.05) associated with a 1.54 and 0.10 µmol/L increase in Hcy. In a multivariable model adjusted for age, sex and body mass index, a 1 µmol/L increase in Hcy, was associated with a 1.69 mmHg and 1.34 mmHg increase in systolic and diastolic pressure (p < 0.0001) respectively; and a 0.01 mmol/L decrease in HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

HHcy occurs among hypertensive Nigerians and it is independently associated with age, HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic BP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria. Circulatory Health Research Laboratory, Old Anatomy Block (Beside School of Nursing and Midwifery), University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria.Circulatory Health Research Laboratory, Old Anatomy Block (Beside School of Nursing and Midwifery), University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria.Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria.Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria.Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Health Sciences, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria.Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja, Abuja, Nigeria.Circulatory Health Research Laboratory, Old Anatomy Block (Beside School of Nursing and Midwifery), University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria. augustine.odili@uniabuja.edu.ng.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33602121

Citation

Chori, Babangida S., et al. "Hyperhomocysteinemia and Its Relations to Conventional Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Adult Nigerians: the REMAH Study." BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, vol. 21, no. 1, 2021, p. 102.
Chori BS, Danladi B, Inyang BA, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia and its relations to conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in adult Nigerians: the REMAH study. BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2021;21(1):102.
Chori, B. S., Danladi, B., Inyang, B. A., Okoh, M. P., Nwegbu, M. M., Alli, A. L., & Odili, A. N. (2021). Hyperhomocysteinemia and its relations to conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in adult Nigerians: the REMAH study. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, 21(1), 102. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12872-021-01913-x
Chori BS, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Its Relations to Conventional Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Adult Nigerians: the REMAH Study. BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2021 02 18;21(1):102. PubMed PMID: 33602121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperhomocysteinemia and its relations to conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in adult Nigerians: the REMAH study. AU - Chori,Babangida S, AU - Danladi,Benjamin, AU - Inyang,Bassey A, AU - Okoh,Michael P, AU - Nwegbu,Maxwell M, AU - Alli,Adewale L, AU - Odili,Augustine N, Y1 - 2021/02/18/ PY - 2020/11/24/received PY - 2021/02/02/accepted PY - 2021/2/19/entrez PY - 2021/2/20/pubmed PY - 2021/10/5/medline KW - Blood pressure KW - Cardiovascular diseases risk factors KW - High-density lipoprotein KW - Hyperhomocysteinemia SP - 102 EP - 102 JF - BMC cardiovascular disorders JO - BMC Cardiovasc Disord VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence linking homocysteine (Hcy) with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) or its risk factors are limited in a sub-Saharan black population. OBJECTIVE: We set out to evaluate the association between Hcy and hypertension and other CVD risk factors in a population of adult Nigerians. METHODS: Data of 156 adults aged 18-70 years was accessed from the North Central study site of the REmoving the MAsk on Hypertension (REMAH) study. Homocysteine, blood glucose and lipid profile in whole blood/serum were measured using standard laboratory methods. Hypertension was diagnosed if average of 5 consecutive blood pressure (BP) measurements obtained using a mercury sphygmomanometer was equal to or higher than 140 systolic and/or 90 mmHg diastolic or the individual is on antihypertensive medication. Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) was defined as Hcy > 10 µmol/L. RESULTS: Of the 156 participants, 72 (43.5%) were hypertensive, of whom 18 had HHcy. Subjects with HHcy were significantly (p < 0.05) older (41.5 vs. 40.6yrs), had lower HDL-cholesterol (0.6 vs. 0.8 mmol/L) and higher systolic (145.5 vs. 126.0 mmHg) and diastolic BP (92.9 vs. 79.6 mmHg), compared to those without HHcy. Intake of alcohol and a 1 yr increase in age were respectively and significantly (p < 0.05) associated with a 1.54 and 0.10 µmol/L increase in Hcy. In a multivariable model adjusted for age, sex and body mass index, a 1 µmol/L increase in Hcy, was associated with a 1.69 mmHg and 1.34 mmHg increase in systolic and diastolic pressure (p < 0.0001) respectively; and a 0.01 mmol/L decrease in HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HHcy occurs among hypertensive Nigerians and it is independently associated with age, HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic BP. SN - 1471-2261 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33602121/Hyperhomocysteinemia_and_its_relations_to_conventional_risk_factors_for_cardiovascular_diseases_in_adult_Nigerians:_the_REMAH_study_ L2 - https://bmccardiovascdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12872-021-01913-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -