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Not Telehealth: Which Primary Care Visits Need In-Person Care?
J Am Board Fam Med. 2021 Feb; 34(Suppl):S162-S169.JA

Abstract

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic has resulted in a rapid shift to telehealth and many services that need in-person care have been avoided. Yet, as practices and payment policies return to a new normal, there will be many questions about what proportion of visits should be done in-person vs telehealth. Using the 2016 National Ambulatory Medical Survey (NAMCS), we estimated what proportion of visits were amenable to telehealth before COVID-19 as a guide. We divided services into those that needed in-person care and those that could be done via telehealth. Any visit that included at least 1 service where in-person care was needed was counted as an in-person only visit. We then calculated what proportion of reported visits and services in 2016 could have been provided via telehealth, as well as what proportion of in-person only services were done by primary care. We found that 66% of all primary care visits reported in NAMCS in 2016 required an in-person service. 90% of all wellness visits and immunizations were done in primary care offices, as were a quarter of all Papanicolaou smears. As practices reopen, patients will need to catch up on many of the in-person only visits that were postponed such as Papanicolaou smears and wellness visits. At the same time, patients and clinicians now accustomed to telehealth may have reservations about returning to in-person only visits. Our estimates may provide a guide to practices as they navigate how to deliver care in a post-COVID-19 environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Primary Care, Washington, DC (YJ, AJ, JW); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (MW). yjabbarpour@aafp.org.From the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Primary Care, Washington, DC (YJ, AJ, JW); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (MW).From the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Primary Care, Washington, DC (YJ, AJ, JW); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (MW).From the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Primary Care, Washington, DC (YJ, AJ, JW); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (MW).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33622832

Citation

Jabbarpour, Yalda, et al. "Not Telehealth: Which Primary Care Visits Need In-Person Care?" Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM, vol. 34, no. Suppl, 2021, pp. S162-S169.
Jabbarpour Y, Jetty A, Westfall M, et al. Not Telehealth: Which Primary Care Visits Need In-Person Care? J Am Board Fam Med. 2021;34(Suppl):S162-S169.
Jabbarpour, Y., Jetty, A., Westfall, M., & Westfall, J. (2021). Not Telehealth: Which Primary Care Visits Need In-Person Care? Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM, 34(Suppl), S162-S169. https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2021.S1.200247
Jabbarpour Y, et al. Not Telehealth: Which Primary Care Visits Need In-Person Care. J Am Board Fam Med. 2021;34(Suppl):S162-S169. PubMed PMID: 33622832.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Not Telehealth: Which Primary Care Visits Need In-Person Care? AU - Jabbarpour,Yalda, AU - Jetty,Anuradha, AU - Westfall,Matthew, AU - Westfall,John, PY - 2020/05/21/received PY - 2020/07/10/revised PY - 2020/07/13/accepted PY - 2021/2/24/entrez PY - 2021/2/25/pubmed PY - 2021/3/10/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - Health Policy KW - Pandemics KW - Primary Health Care KW - Surveys and Questionnaires KW - Telemedicine SP - S162 EP - S169 JF - Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM JO - J Am Board Fam Med VL - 34 IS - Suppl N2 - The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic has resulted in a rapid shift to telehealth and many services that need in-person care have been avoided. Yet, as practices and payment policies return to a new normal, there will be many questions about what proportion of visits should be done in-person vs telehealth. Using the 2016 National Ambulatory Medical Survey (NAMCS), we estimated what proportion of visits were amenable to telehealth before COVID-19 as a guide. We divided services into those that needed in-person care and those that could be done via telehealth. Any visit that included at least 1 service where in-person care was needed was counted as an in-person only visit. We then calculated what proportion of reported visits and services in 2016 could have been provided via telehealth, as well as what proportion of in-person only services were done by primary care. We found that 66% of all primary care visits reported in NAMCS in 2016 required an in-person service. 90% of all wellness visits and immunizations were done in primary care offices, as were a quarter of all Papanicolaou smears. As practices reopen, patients will need to catch up on many of the in-person only visits that were postponed such as Papanicolaou smears and wellness visits. At the same time, patients and clinicians now accustomed to telehealth may have reservations about returning to in-person only visits. Our estimates may provide a guide to practices as they navigate how to deliver care in a post-COVID-19 environment. SN - 1558-7118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33622832/Not_Telehealth:_Which_Primary_Care_Visits_Need_In_Person_Care L2 - http://www.jabfm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=33622832 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -