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Association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes: a cohort study.
BMJ Open. 2021 02 23; 11(2):e047900.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The secondary impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

DESIGN

We conduced retrospective analyses on two cohorts comprising 7699 pregnant women in Beijing, China, and compared pregnancy outcomes between the pre-COVID-2019 cohort (women who delivered from 20 May 2019 to 30 November 2019) and the COVID-2019 cohort (women who delivered from 20 January 2020 to 31 July 2020). The secondary impacts of the COVID-2019 pandemic on pregnancy outcomes were assessed by using multivariate log-binomial regression models, and we used interrupted time-series (ITS) regression analysis to further control the effects of time-trends.

SETTING

One tertiary-level centre in Beijing, China PARTICIPANTS: 7699 pregnant women.

RESULTS

Compared with women in the pre-COVID-19 pandemic group, pregnant women during the COVID-2019 pandemic were more likely to be of advanced age, exhibit insufficient or excessive gestational weight gain and show a family history of chronic disease (all p<0.05). After controlling for other confounding factors, the risk of premature rupture of membranes and foetal distress was increased by 11% (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.18; p<0.01) and 14% (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.29; p<0.05), respectively, during the COVID-2019 pandemic. The association still remained in the ITS analysis after additionally controlling for time-trends (all p<0.01). We uncovered no other associations between the COVID-19 pandemic and other pregnancy outcomes (p>0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

During the COVID-19 pandemic, more women manifested either insufficient or excessive gestational weight gain; and the risk of premature rupture of membranes and foetal distress was also higher during the pandemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Tongzhou District, Beijing, China.Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Tongzhou District, Beijing, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China jueliu@bjmu.edu.cn. National Health Commission Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33622959

Citation

Du, Min, et al. "Association Between the COVID-19 Pandemic and the Risk for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: a Cohort Study." BMJ Open, vol. 11, no. 2, 2021, pp. e047900.
Du M, Yang J, Han N, et al. Association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes: a cohort study. BMJ Open. 2021;11(2):e047900.
Du, M., Yang, J., Han, N., Liu, M., & Liu, J. (2021). Association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes: a cohort study. BMJ Open, 11(2), e047900. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-047900
Du M, et al. Association Between the COVID-19 Pandemic and the Risk for Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: a Cohort Study. BMJ Open. 2021 02 23;11(2):e047900. PubMed PMID: 33622959.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes: a cohort study. AU - Du,Min, AU - Yang,Jie, AU - Han,Na, AU - Liu,Min, AU - Liu,Jue, Y1 - 2021/02/23/ PY - 2021/2/24/entrez PY - 2021/2/25/pubmed PY - 2021/3/2/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - fetal medicine KW - maternal medicine KW - public health SP - e047900 EP - e047900 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The secondary impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association between the COVID-19 pandemic and the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. DESIGN: We conduced retrospective analyses on two cohorts comprising 7699 pregnant women in Beijing, China, and compared pregnancy outcomes between the pre-COVID-2019 cohort (women who delivered from 20 May 2019 to 30 November 2019) and the COVID-2019 cohort (women who delivered from 20 January 2020 to 31 July 2020). The secondary impacts of the COVID-2019 pandemic on pregnancy outcomes were assessed by using multivariate log-binomial regression models, and we used interrupted time-series (ITS) regression analysis to further control the effects of time-trends. SETTING: One tertiary-level centre in Beijing, China PARTICIPANTS: 7699 pregnant women. RESULTS: Compared with women in the pre-COVID-19 pandemic group, pregnant women during the COVID-2019 pandemic were more likely to be of advanced age, exhibit insufficient or excessive gestational weight gain and show a family history of chronic disease (all p<0.05). After controlling for other confounding factors, the risk of premature rupture of membranes and foetal distress was increased by 11% (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.18; p<0.01) and 14% (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.29; p<0.05), respectively, during the COVID-2019 pandemic. The association still remained in the ITS analysis after additionally controlling for time-trends (all p<0.01). We uncovered no other associations between the COVID-19 pandemic and other pregnancy outcomes (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, more women manifested either insufficient or excessive gestational weight gain; and the risk of premature rupture of membranes and foetal distress was also higher during the pandemic. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33622959/Association_between_the_COVID_19_pandemic_and_the_risk_for_adverse_pregnancy_outcomes:_a_cohort_study_ L2 - https://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=33622959 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -