Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Airborne dispersion of droplets during coughing: a physical model of viral transmission.
Sci Rep. 2021 02 25; 11(1):4617.SR

Abstract

The Covid-19 pandemic has focused attention on airborne transmission of viruses. Using realistic air flow simulation, we model droplet dispersion from coughing and study the transmission risk related to SARS-CoV-2. Although this model defines most airborne droplets as 8-16 µm in diameter, we infer that larger droplets of 32-40 µm in diameter may potentially be more infectious due to higher viral content. Use of face masks is therefore recommended for both personal and social protection. We found social distancing effective at reducing transmission potential across all droplet sizes. However, the presence of a human body 1 m away modifies the aerodynamics so that downstream droplet dispersion is enhanced, which has implications on safe distancing in queues. At 1 m distance, we found that an average of 0.55 viral copies is inhaled for a cough at median loading, scalable up to 340 copies at peak loading. Droplet evaporation results in significant reduction in droplet counts, but airborne transmission remains possible even under low humidity conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis, 138632, Singapore.A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis, 138632, Singapore. leongfy@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg.A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis, 138632, Singapore.A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis, 138632, Singapore.A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis, 138632, Singapore.Department of Infectious Diseases, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore, 169608, Singapore.Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore, 169608, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33633316

Citation

Li, Hongying, et al. "Airborne Dispersion of Droplets During Coughing: a Physical Model of Viral Transmission." Scientific Reports, vol. 11, no. 1, 2021, p. 4617.
Li H, Leong FY, Xu G, et al. Airborne dispersion of droplets during coughing: a physical model of viral transmission. Sci Rep. 2021;11(1):4617.
Li, H., Leong, F. Y., Xu, G., Kang, C. W., Lim, K. H., Tan, B. H., & Loo, C. M. (2021). Airborne dispersion of droplets during coughing: a physical model of viral transmission. Scientific Reports, 11(1), 4617. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-84245-2
Li H, et al. Airborne Dispersion of Droplets During Coughing: a Physical Model of Viral Transmission. Sci Rep. 2021 02 25;11(1):4617. PubMed PMID: 33633316.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Airborne dispersion of droplets during coughing: a physical model of viral transmission. AU - Li,Hongying, AU - Leong,Fong Yew, AU - Xu,George, AU - Kang,Chang Wei, AU - Lim,Keng Hui, AU - Tan,Ban Hock, AU - Loo,Chian Min, Y1 - 2021/02/25/ PY - 2020/08/05/received PY - 2021/02/08/accepted PY - 2021/2/26/entrez PY - 2021/2/27/pubmed PY - 2021/3/12/medline SP - 4617 EP - 4617 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - The Covid-19 pandemic has focused attention on airborne transmission of viruses. Using realistic air flow simulation, we model droplet dispersion from coughing and study the transmission risk related to SARS-CoV-2. Although this model defines most airborne droplets as 8-16 µm in diameter, we infer that larger droplets of 32-40 µm in diameter may potentially be more infectious due to higher viral content. Use of face masks is therefore recommended for both personal and social protection. We found social distancing effective at reducing transmission potential across all droplet sizes. However, the presence of a human body 1 m away modifies the aerodynamics so that downstream droplet dispersion is enhanced, which has implications on safe distancing in queues. At 1 m distance, we found that an average of 0.55 viral copies is inhaled for a cough at median loading, scalable up to 340 copies at peak loading. Droplet evaporation results in significant reduction in droplet counts, but airborne transmission remains possible even under low humidity conditions. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33633316/Airborne_dispersion_of_droplets_during_coughing:_a_physical_model_of_viral_transmission_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-84245-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -