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Socioeconomic Impact of RSV Hospitalization.
Infect Dis Ther. 2021 Mar; 10(Suppl 1):35-45.ID

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and socioeconomic burden worldwide among young children. The majority of RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and mortality occurs in developing countries and is associated with various sociodemographic risk factors. Independent risk factors for severe RSV disease include age and premature birth. While RSV mortality in developed countries is lower relative to developing countries, high-risk infants with comorbidities experience higher rates of mortality. RSV LRTI is often severe and is associated with hospitalization, increased need for intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation, long-term complications, and caregiver stress and loss of work productivity. Overall, these factors translate to higher health care resource utilization and costs and should be factored into the consideration for RSV prophylaxis. Multiple vaccine candidates and long-acting monoclonal antibodies are in various stages of clinical development. Currently, palivizumab is the only approved RSV immunoprophylaxis available for use in specific high-risk pediatric populations. This review will discuss the socioeconomic impact and health care resource utilization of RSV-related hospitalization (RSVH) as well as various sociodemographic risk factors that can be used to identify children at high risk of developing severe RSV disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA. m_a_young@Howard.edu.Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33656651

Citation

Young, Michal, and Lynn Smitherman. "Socioeconomic Impact of RSV Hospitalization." Infectious Diseases and Therapy, vol. 10, no. Suppl 1, 2021, pp. 35-45.
Young M, Smitherman L. Socioeconomic Impact of RSV Hospitalization. Infect Dis Ther. 2021;10(Suppl 1):35-45.
Young, M., & Smitherman, L. (2021). Socioeconomic Impact of RSV Hospitalization. Infectious Diseases and Therapy, 10(Suppl 1), 35-45. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40121-020-00390-7
Young M, Smitherman L. Socioeconomic Impact of RSV Hospitalization. Infect Dis Ther. 2021;10(Suppl 1):35-45. PubMed PMID: 33656651.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socioeconomic Impact of RSV Hospitalization. AU - Young,Michal, AU - Smitherman,Lynn, Y1 - 2021/03/03/ PY - 2020/12/08/received PY - 2020/12/09/accepted PY - 2021/3/4/pubmed PY - 2021/3/4/medline PY - 2021/3/3/entrez KW - Caregiver burden KW - Cost-effectiveness KW - Health care utilization KW - High-risk infants KW - Immunoprophylaxis KW - Palivizumab KW - Quality of life KW - RSV-related hospitalization KW - Risk-factor predictive model KW - Socioeconomic factors SP - 35 EP - 45 JF - Infectious diseases and therapy JO - Infect Dis Ther VL - 10 IS - Suppl 1 N2 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and socioeconomic burden worldwide among young children. The majority of RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and mortality occurs in developing countries and is associated with various sociodemographic risk factors. Independent risk factors for severe RSV disease include age and premature birth. While RSV mortality in developed countries is lower relative to developing countries, high-risk infants with comorbidities experience higher rates of mortality. RSV LRTI is often severe and is associated with hospitalization, increased need for intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation, long-term complications, and caregiver stress and loss of work productivity. Overall, these factors translate to higher health care resource utilization and costs and should be factored into the consideration for RSV prophylaxis. Multiple vaccine candidates and long-acting monoclonal antibodies are in various stages of clinical development. Currently, palivizumab is the only approved RSV immunoprophylaxis available for use in specific high-risk pediatric populations. This review will discuss the socioeconomic impact and health care resource utilization of RSV-related hospitalization (RSVH) as well as various sociodemographic risk factors that can be used to identify children at high risk of developing severe RSV disease. SN - 2193-8229 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33656651/Socioeconomic_Impact_of_RSV_Hospitalization. L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40121-020-00390-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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