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Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nephrology Fellow Training and Well-Being in the United States: A National Survey.
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2021 05 03; 32(5):1236-1248.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic's effects on nephrology fellows' educational experiences, preparedness for practice, and emotional wellbeing are unknown.

METHODS

We recruited current adult and pediatric fellows and 2020 graduates of nephrology training programs in the United States to participate in a survey measuring COVID-19's effects on their training experiences and wellbeing.

RESULTS

Of 1005 nephrology fellows-in-training and recent graduates, 425 participated (response rate 42%). Telehealth was widely adopted (90% for some or all outpatient nephrology consults), as was remote learning (76% of conferences were exclusively online). Most respondents (64%) did not have in-person consults on COVID-19 inpatients; these patients were managed by telehealth visits (27%), by in-person visits with the attending faculty without fellows (29%), or by another approach (9%). A majority of fellows (84%) and graduates (82%) said their training programs successfully sustained their education during the pandemic, and most fellows (86%) and graduates (90%) perceived themselves as prepared for unsupervised practice. Although 42% indicated the pandemic had negatively affected their overall quality of life and 33% reported a poorer work-life balance, only 15% of 412 respondents who completed the Resident Well-Being Index met its distress threshold. Risk for distress was increased among respondents who perceived the pandemic had impaired their knowledge base (odds ratio [OR], 3.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.00 to 4.77) or negatively affected their quality of life (OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 2.29 to 5.46) or work-life balance (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.18 to 4.71).

CONCLUSIONS

Despite major shifts in education modalities and patient care protocols precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, participants perceived their education and preparation for practice to be minimally affected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Data Science and Public Impact, American Society of Nephrology, Washington, DC kpivert@asn-online.org.Section of Nephrology, Hypertension, and Kidney Transplantation, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, University of Washington and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington.Charles Bronfman Institute of Personalized Medicine, Department of Genetics and Genomics; Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.Division of Kidney Diseases and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Great Neck, New York.Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nephrology and Hypertension-Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio.Department of Nephrology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California.Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33658283

Citation

Pivert, Kurtis A., et al. "Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic On Nephrology Fellow Training and Well-Being in the United States: a National Survey." Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, vol. 32, no. 5, 2021, pp. 1236-1248.
Pivert KA, Boyle SM, Halbach SM, et al. Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nephrology Fellow Training and Well-Being in the United States: A National Survey. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2021;32(5):1236-1248.
Pivert, K. A., Boyle, S. M., Halbach, S. M., Chan, L., Shah, H. H., Waitzman, J. S., Mehdi, A., Norouzi, S., & Sozio, S. M. (2021). Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nephrology Fellow Training and Well-Being in the United States: A National Survey. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 32(5), 1236-1248. https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2020111636
Pivert KA, et al. Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic On Nephrology Fellow Training and Well-Being in the United States: a National Survey. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2021 05 3;32(5):1236-1248. PubMed PMID: 33658283.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nephrology Fellow Training and Well-Being in the United States: A National Survey. AU - Pivert,Kurtis A, AU - Boyle,Suzanne M, AU - Halbach,Susan M, AU - Chan,Lili, AU - Shah,Hitesh H, AU - Waitzman,Joshua S, AU - Mehdi,Ali, AU - Norouzi,Sayna, AU - Sozio,Stephen M, Y1 - 2021/03/03/ PY - 2020/11/23/received PY - 2021/01/21/accepted PY - 2022/05/03/pmc-release PY - 2021/3/5/pubmed PY - 2021/5/14/medline PY - 2021/3/4/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - COVID-19 pandemic KW - nephrology training KW - physician burnout SP - 1236 EP - 1248 JF - Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN JO - J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic's effects on nephrology fellows' educational experiences, preparedness for practice, and emotional wellbeing are unknown. METHODS: We recruited current adult and pediatric fellows and 2020 graduates of nephrology training programs in the United States to participate in a survey measuring COVID-19's effects on their training experiences and wellbeing. RESULTS: Of 1005 nephrology fellows-in-training and recent graduates, 425 participated (response rate 42%). Telehealth was widely adopted (90% for some or all outpatient nephrology consults), as was remote learning (76% of conferences were exclusively online). Most respondents (64%) did not have in-person consults on COVID-19 inpatients; these patients were managed by telehealth visits (27%), by in-person visits with the attending faculty without fellows (29%), or by another approach (9%). A majority of fellows (84%) and graduates (82%) said their training programs successfully sustained their education during the pandemic, and most fellows (86%) and graduates (90%) perceived themselves as prepared for unsupervised practice. Although 42% indicated the pandemic had negatively affected their overall quality of life and 33% reported a poorer work-life balance, only 15% of 412 respondents who completed the Resident Well-Being Index met its distress threshold. Risk for distress was increased among respondents who perceived the pandemic had impaired their knowledge base (odds ratio [OR], 3.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.00 to 4.77) or negatively affected their quality of life (OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 2.29 to 5.46) or work-life balance (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.18 to 4.71). CONCLUSIONS: Despite major shifts in education modalities and patient care protocols precipitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, participants perceived their education and preparation for practice to be minimally affected. SN - 1533-3450 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33658283/Impact_of_the_COVID_19_Pandemic_on_Nephrology_Fellow_Training_and_Well_Being_in_the_United_States:_A_National_Survey_ L2 - https://jasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=33658283 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -