Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Limited specificity of commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in serum samples of African origin.
Trop Med Int Health. 2021 06; 26(6):621-631.TM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Specific serological tests are mandatory for reliable SARS-CoV-2 diagnostics and seroprevalence studies. Here, we assess the specificities of four commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in serum/plasma panels originating from Africa, South America, and Europe.

METHODS

882 serum/plasma samples collected from symptom-free donors before the COVID-19 pandemic in three African countries (Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria), Colombia, and Germany were analysed with three nucleocapsid-based ELISAs (Euroimmun Anti-SARS-CoV-2-NCP IgG, EDI™ Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 IgG, Mikrogen recomWell SARS-CoV-2 IgG), one spike/S1-based ELISA (Euroimmun Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG), and in-house common cold CoV ELISAs.

RESULTS

High specificity was confirmed for all SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs for Madagascan (93.4-99.4%), Colombian (97.8-100.0%), and German (95.9-100.0%) samples. In contrast, specificity was much lower for the Ghanaian and Nigerian serum panels (Ghana: NCP-based assays 77.7-89.7%, spike/S1-based assay 94.3%; Nigeria: NCP-based assays 39.3-82.7%, spike/S1-based assay 90.7%). 15 of 600 African sera were concordantly classified as positive in both the NCP-based and the spike/S1-based Euroimmun ELISA, but did not inhibit spike/ACE2 binding in a surrogate virus neutralisation test. IgG antibodies elicited by previous infections with common cold CoVs were found in all sample panels, including those from Madagascar, Colombia, and Germany and thus do not inevitably hamper assay specificity. Nevertheless, high levels of IgG antibodies interacting with OC43 NCP were found in all 15 SARS-CoV-2 NCP/spike/S1 ELISA positive sera.

CONCLUSIONS

Depending on the chosen antigen and assay protocol, SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISA specificity may be significantly reduced in certain populations probably due to interference of immune responses to endemic pathogens like other viruses or parasites.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department for Virology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. Department of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Center of Internal Medicine II, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.Department for Infectious Disease Diagnostics, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Department for Infectious Disease Diagnostics, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Department for Virology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Department for Virology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Department for Virology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany.Department for Virology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany.Department for Virology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany.German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany. Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany. Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany. Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Global Health and Infectious Disease Research Group, Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana.German Center for Infection Research, Hamburg - Lübeck - Borstel - Riems, Germany. Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research Group, Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana.Department for Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo, Madagascar.Institute of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria.Institute of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria.Medical Mission Institute, Würzburg, Germany.Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Department for Infectious Disease Diagnostics, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. National Reference Centre for Tropical Pathogens, Hamburg, Germany.Department for Infectious Disease Diagnostics, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33666297

Citation

Emmerich, Petra, et al. "Limited Specificity of Commercially Available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in Serum Samples of African Origin." Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, vol. 26, no. 6, 2021, pp. 621-631.
Emmerich P, Murawski C, Ehmen C, et al. Limited specificity of commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in serum samples of African origin. Trop Med Int Health. 2021;26(6):621-631.
Emmerich, P., Murawski, C., Ehmen, C., von Possel, R., Pekarek, N., Oestereich, L., Duraffour, S., Pahlmann, M., Struck, N., Eibach, D., Krumkamp, R., Amuasi, J., Maiga-Ascofaré, O., Rakotozandrindrainy, R., Asogun, D., Ighodalo, Y., Kann, S., May, J., Tannich, E., & Deschermeier, C. (2021). Limited specificity of commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in serum samples of African origin. Tropical Medicine & International Health : TM & IH, 26(6), 621-631. https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.13569
Emmerich P, et al. Limited Specificity of Commercially Available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in Serum Samples of African Origin. Trop Med Int Health. 2021;26(6):621-631. PubMed PMID: 33666297.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Limited specificity of commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in serum samples of African origin. AU - Emmerich,Petra, AU - Murawski,Carolin, AU - Ehmen,Christa, AU - von Possel,Ronald, AU - Pekarek,Neele, AU - Oestereich,Lisa, AU - Duraffour,Sophie, AU - Pahlmann,Meike, AU - Struck,Nicole, AU - Eibach,Daniel, AU - Krumkamp,Ralf, AU - Amuasi,John, AU - Maiga-Ascofaré,Oumou, AU - Rakotozandrindrainy,Raphael, AU - Asogun,Danny, AU - Ighodalo,Yemisi, AU - Kann,Simone, AU - May,Jürgen, AU - Tannich,Egbert, AU - Deschermeier,Christina, Y1 - 2021/04/05/ PY - 2021/3/6/pubmed PY - 2021/6/9/medline PY - 2021/3/5/entrez KW - Africa KW - Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - immunoglobulin G KW - seroepidemiologic studies KW - specificity SP - 621 EP - 631 JF - Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH JO - Trop Med Int Health VL - 26 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Specific serological tests are mandatory for reliable SARS-CoV-2 diagnostics and seroprevalence studies. Here, we assess the specificities of four commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs in serum/plasma panels originating from Africa, South America, and Europe. METHODS: 882 serum/plasma samples collected from symptom-free donors before the COVID-19 pandemic in three African countries (Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria), Colombia, and Germany were analysed with three nucleocapsid-based ELISAs (Euroimmun Anti-SARS-CoV-2-NCP IgG, EDI™ Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 IgG, Mikrogen recomWell SARS-CoV-2 IgG), one spike/S1-based ELISA (Euroimmun Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG), and in-house common cold CoV ELISAs. RESULTS: High specificity was confirmed for all SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs for Madagascan (93.4-99.4%), Colombian (97.8-100.0%), and German (95.9-100.0%) samples. In contrast, specificity was much lower for the Ghanaian and Nigerian serum panels (Ghana: NCP-based assays 77.7-89.7%, spike/S1-based assay 94.3%; Nigeria: NCP-based assays 39.3-82.7%, spike/S1-based assay 90.7%). 15 of 600 African sera were concordantly classified as positive in both the NCP-based and the spike/S1-based Euroimmun ELISA, but did not inhibit spike/ACE2 binding in a surrogate virus neutralisation test. IgG antibodies elicited by previous infections with common cold CoVs were found in all sample panels, including those from Madagascar, Colombia, and Germany and thus do not inevitably hamper assay specificity. Nevertheless, high levels of IgG antibodies interacting with OC43 NCP were found in all 15 SARS-CoV-2 NCP/spike/S1 ELISA positive sera. CONCLUSIONS: Depending on the chosen antigen and assay protocol, SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISA specificity may be significantly reduced in certain populations probably due to interference of immune responses to endemic pathogens like other viruses or parasites. SN - 1365-3156 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33666297/Limited_specificity_of_commercially_available_SARS_CoV_2_IgG_ELISAs_in_serum_samples_of_African_origin_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.13569 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -