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Intimate Partner Violence and the Role of Child Maltreatment and Neighborhood Violence: A Retrospective Study of African American and US Caribbean Black Women.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 02 24; 18(5)IJ

Abstract

Background:

Research suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with childhood maltreatment and violence exposure within the neighborhood context. This study examined the role of child maltreatment and violence exposure on intimate partner violence, with the moderating effects of mental disorders (IPV) among US Black women.

Methods:

Data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the largest and most complete sample on the mental health of US Blacks, and the first representative sample of Caribbean Blacks residing in the United States was used to address the study objectives. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test of independence, t-test, and logistic regression procedures were used to analyze the data.

Results:

Bivariate results indicate an association between child abuse and intimate partner victimization among US Black women. Witnessing violence as a child as well as neighborhood violence exposure was also related to IPV but shown to differ between African American and Caribbean Black women. Multivariate findings confirmed the influence of mental disorders and social conditions on US Black women's risk for IPV. Moderating effects of child maltreatment and mental disorders in association with adult IPV were not found.

Conclusions:

The study addressed the short and long-term impact of child maltreatment and the contribution to the cycle of intimate violence among US Black women including African American and Caribbean Blacks. The study suggests the need for prevention and intervention efforts to improve structural conditions for at-risk populations and communities predisposed to violence and other negative outcomes. Possibilities for future research are also discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology and African and African American Studies, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, MI 48128, USA.CASL, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, MI 48128, USA.Human Development and Nursing Sciences, College of Nursing, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33668319

Citation

Lacey, Krim K., et al. "Intimate Partner Violence and the Role of Child Maltreatment and Neighborhood Violence: a Retrospective Study of African American and US Caribbean Black Women." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 18, no. 5, 2021.
Lacey KK, Shahid HR, Jeremiah RD. Intimate Partner Violence and the Role of Child Maltreatment and Neighborhood Violence: A Retrospective Study of African American and US Caribbean Black Women. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18(5).
Lacey, K. K., Shahid, H. R., & Jeremiah, R. D. (2021). Intimate Partner Violence and the Role of Child Maltreatment and Neighborhood Violence: A Retrospective Study of African American and US Caribbean Black Women. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(5). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052245
Lacey KK, Shahid HR, Jeremiah RD. Intimate Partner Violence and the Role of Child Maltreatment and Neighborhood Violence: a Retrospective Study of African American and US Caribbean Black Women. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 02 24;18(5) PubMed PMID: 33668319.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate Partner Violence and the Role of Child Maltreatment and Neighborhood Violence: A Retrospective Study of African American and US Caribbean Black Women. AU - Lacey,Krim K, AU - Shahid,Hira R, AU - Jeremiah,Rohan D, Y1 - 2021/02/24/ PY - 2021/01/01/received PY - 2021/02/18/revised PY - 2021/02/19/accepted PY - 2021/3/6/entrez PY - 2021/3/7/pubmed PY - 2021/4/24/medline KW - child maltreatment KW - intimate partner violence KW - mental health KW - violent exposure JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - Background: Research suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with childhood maltreatment and violence exposure within the neighborhood context. This study examined the role of child maltreatment and violence exposure on intimate partner violence, with the moderating effects of mental disorders (IPV) among US Black women. Methods: Data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the largest and most complete sample on the mental health of US Blacks, and the first representative sample of Caribbean Blacks residing in the United States was used to address the study objectives. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test of independence, t-test, and logistic regression procedures were used to analyze the data. Results: Bivariate results indicate an association between child abuse and intimate partner victimization among US Black women. Witnessing violence as a child as well as neighborhood violence exposure was also related to IPV but shown to differ between African American and Caribbean Black women. Multivariate findings confirmed the influence of mental disorders and social conditions on US Black women's risk for IPV. Moderating effects of child maltreatment and mental disorders in association with adult IPV were not found. Conclusions: The study addressed the short and long-term impact of child maltreatment and the contribution to the cycle of intimate violence among US Black women including African American and Caribbean Blacks. The study suggests the need for prevention and intervention efforts to improve structural conditions for at-risk populations and communities predisposed to violence and other negative outcomes. Possibilities for future research are also discussed. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33668319/Intimate_Partner_Violence_and_the_Role_of_Child_Maltreatment_and_Neighborhood_Violence:_A_Retrospective_Study_of_African_American_and_US_Caribbean_Black_Women_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph18052245 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -