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The potential effects of deploying SARS-Cov-2 vaccines on cold storage capacity and immunization workload in countries of the WHO African Region.
Vaccine. 2021 04 08; 39(15):2165-2176.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

SARS-CoV-2 vaccines will be deployed to countries with limited immunization systems.

METHODS

We assessed the effect of deploying SARS-Cov-2 vaccines on cold storage capacity and immunization workload in a simulated WHO African Region country using region-specific data on immunization, population, healthcare workers (HCWs), cold storage capacity (quartile values for national and subnational levels), and characteristics of an approved SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. We calculated monthly increases in vaccine doses, doses per vaccinator, and cold storage volumes for four-month SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns targeting risk groups compared to routine immunization baselines.

RESULTS

Administering SARS-CoV-2 vaccines to risk groups would increase total monthly doses by 27.0% for ≥ 65 years, 91.7% for chronic diseases patients, and 1.1% for HCWs. Assuming median nurse density estimates adjusted for absenteeism and proportion providing immunization services, SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns would increase total monthly doses per vaccinator by 29.3% for ≥ 65 years, 99.6% for chronic diseases patients, and 1.2% for HCWs. When we applied quartiles of actual African Region country vaccine storage capacity, routine immunization vaccine volumes exceeded national-level storage capacity for at least 75% of countries, but subnational levels had sufficient storage capacity for SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for at least 75% of countries.

CONCLUSIONS

In the WHO African Region, SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns would substantially increase doses per vaccinator and cold storage capacity requirements over routine immunization baselines. Pandemic vaccination campaigns would increase storage requirements of national-level stores already at their limits, but sufficient capacity exists at subnational levels. Immediate attention to strengthening immunization systems is essential to support pandemic responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, 685 W. Baltimore St., University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jortiz@som.umaryland.edu.PATH, 2201 Westlake Avenue, Suite 200, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: jrobertson@path.org.PATH, 2201 Westlake Avenue, Suite 200, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: jhsu@path.org.Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, 685 W. Baltimore St., University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: stephen.yu@hsc.wvu.edu.Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, 685 W. Baltimore St., University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: ADriscoll@som.umaryland.edu.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 110 S. Paca St, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: Sarah.Williams@som.umaryland.edu.Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, 685 W. Baltimore St., University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: Wilbur.Chen@som.umaryland.edu.Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, 685 W. Baltimore St., University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: meagan.fitzpatrick@som.umaryland.edu.Centre pour le Développement des Vaccins, Ministère de la Santé, BP251Bamako, Mali. Electronic address: ssow@som.umaryland.edu.Independent Consultant, Tranchepied 10, 1278 La Rippe, Switzerland. Electronic address: rbiellik@gmail.com.Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health, 685 W. Baltimore St., University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: kneuzil@som.umaryland.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33744049

Citation

Ortiz, Justin R., et al. "The Potential Effects of Deploying SARS-Cov-2 Vaccines On Cold Storage Capacity and Immunization Workload in Countries of the WHO African Region." Vaccine, vol. 39, no. 15, 2021, pp. 2165-2176.
Ortiz JR, Robertson J, Hsu JS, et al. The potential effects of deploying SARS-Cov-2 vaccines on cold storage capacity and immunization workload in countries of the WHO African Region. Vaccine. 2021;39(15):2165-2176.
Ortiz, J. R., Robertson, J., Hsu, J. S., Yu, S. L., Driscoll, A. J., Williams, S. R., Chen, W. H., Fitzpatrick, M. C., Sow, S., Biellik, R. J., & Neuzil, K. M. (2021). The potential effects of deploying SARS-Cov-2 vaccines on cold storage capacity and immunization workload in countries of the WHO African Region. Vaccine, 39(15), 2165-2176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.02.037
Ortiz JR, et al. The Potential Effects of Deploying SARS-Cov-2 Vaccines On Cold Storage Capacity and Immunization Workload in Countries of the WHO African Region. Vaccine. 2021 04 8;39(15):2165-2176. PubMed PMID: 33744049.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The potential effects of deploying SARS-Cov-2 vaccines on cold storage capacity and immunization workload in countries of the WHO African Region. AU - Ortiz,Justin R, AU - Robertson,Joanie, AU - Hsu,Jui-Shan, AU - Yu,Stephen L, AU - Driscoll,Amanda J, AU - Williams,Sarah R, AU - Chen,Wilbur H, AU - Fitzpatrick,Meagan C, AU - Sow,Samba, AU - Biellik,Robin J, AU - Neuzil,Kathleen M, Y1 - 2021/02/19/ PY - 2020/11/03/received PY - 2021/01/12/revised PY - 2021/02/15/accepted PY - 2021/3/22/pubmed PY - 2021/4/16/medline PY - 2021/3/21/entrez KW - Africa, SARS-CoV-2 KW - Delivery KW - Immunization KW - Implementation SP - 2165 EP - 2176 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 39 IS - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 vaccines will be deployed to countries with limited immunization systems. METHODS: We assessed the effect of deploying SARS-Cov-2 vaccines on cold storage capacity and immunization workload in a simulated WHO African Region country using region-specific data on immunization, population, healthcare workers (HCWs), cold storage capacity (quartile values for national and subnational levels), and characteristics of an approved SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. We calculated monthly increases in vaccine doses, doses per vaccinator, and cold storage volumes for four-month SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns targeting risk groups compared to routine immunization baselines. RESULTS: Administering SARS-CoV-2 vaccines to risk groups would increase total monthly doses by 27.0% for ≥ 65 years, 91.7% for chronic diseases patients, and 1.1% for HCWs. Assuming median nurse density estimates adjusted for absenteeism and proportion providing immunization services, SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns would increase total monthly doses per vaccinator by 29.3% for ≥ 65 years, 99.6% for chronic diseases patients, and 1.2% for HCWs. When we applied quartiles of actual African Region country vaccine storage capacity, routine immunization vaccine volumes exceeded national-level storage capacity for at least 75% of countries, but subnational levels had sufficient storage capacity for SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for at least 75% of countries. CONCLUSIONS: In the WHO African Region, SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaigns would substantially increase doses per vaccinator and cold storage capacity requirements over routine immunization baselines. Pandemic vaccination campaigns would increase storage requirements of national-level stores already at their limits, but sufficient capacity exists at subnational levels. Immediate attention to strengthening immunization systems is essential to support pandemic responses. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33744049/The_potential_effects_of_deploying_SARS_Cov_2_vaccines_on_cold_storage_capacity_and_immunization_workload_in_countries_of_the_WHO_African_Region_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(21)00204-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -