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Chocolate and heartburn: evidence of increased esophageal acid exposure after chocolate ingestion.
Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Jun; 83(6):633-6.AJ

Abstract

Chocolate has been shown to decrease mean basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, providing a rationale for the pathogenesis of chocolate-induced reflux symptoms. We assessed the relationship between chocolate ingestion and increased esophageal acid exposure using intraesophageal pH monitoring. Compared with ingestion of a dextrose control solution of similar volume, osmolality, and calories, postprandial ingestion of chocolate resulted in a significant increase in acid exposure in the first postprandial hour in patients with esophagitis. We conclude that this finding supports recommendations that patients with reflux esophagitis abstain from chocolate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3376917

Citation

Murphy, D W., and D O. Castell. "Chocolate and Heartburn: Evidence of Increased Esophageal Acid Exposure After Chocolate Ingestion." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 83, no. 6, 1988, pp. 633-6.
Murphy DW, Castell DO. Chocolate and heartburn: evidence of increased esophageal acid exposure after chocolate ingestion. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988;83(6):633-6.
Murphy, D. W., & Castell, D. O. (1988). Chocolate and heartburn: evidence of increased esophageal acid exposure after chocolate ingestion. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 83(6), 633-6.
Murphy DW, Castell DO. Chocolate and Heartburn: Evidence of Increased Esophageal Acid Exposure After Chocolate Ingestion. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988;83(6):633-6. PubMed PMID: 3376917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chocolate and heartburn: evidence of increased esophageal acid exposure after chocolate ingestion. AU - Murphy,D W, AU - Castell,D O, PY - 1988/6/1/pubmed PY - 1988/6/1/medline PY - 1988/6/1/entrez SP - 633 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 83 IS - 6 N2 - Chocolate has been shown to decrease mean basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, providing a rationale for the pathogenesis of chocolate-induced reflux symptoms. We assessed the relationship between chocolate ingestion and increased esophageal acid exposure using intraesophageal pH monitoring. Compared with ingestion of a dextrose control solution of similar volume, osmolality, and calories, postprandial ingestion of chocolate resulted in a significant increase in acid exposure in the first postprandial hour in patients with esophagitis. We conclude that this finding supports recommendations that patients with reflux esophagitis abstain from chocolate. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3376917/Chocolate_and_heartburn:_evidence_of_increased_esophageal_acid_exposure_after_chocolate_ingestion_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/heartburn.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -