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COVID-19 vaccination attitudes, values and intentions among United States adults prior to emergency use authorization.
Vaccine. 2021 05 06; 39(19):2698-2711.V

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Safe and effective vaccines against Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) provide the best opportunity to control the pandemic. Having safe and efficacious vaccines available is only half the equation; people must also take them. We describe a study to identify COVID-19 vaccine attitudes, values and intentions immediately preceding authorization of COVID-19 vaccines in the US.

METHODS

A national panel survey was conducted to measure intent to receive COVID-19 vaccines as well as disease and vaccine attitudes, values and trust in local, state and federal public health authorities.

RESULTS

Greater than 80% of respondents reported confidence they could adhere to COVID recommendations such as mask wearing, social distancing and hand washing. The majority of respondents (70%) reported believing that current drugs were somewhat or very good at treating COVID-19 infection. Vaccine intent fell into three groups: Intenders (50%), Wait and Learn (40%), and Unlikelys (10%). Intent to get vaccinated was substantially lower among African American (32%), and higher among men (56%), those over 60 years of age (61%), those with a Bachelor's degree or higher (63%), and Democrats (63%). The Wait and Learn group, compared to the Intenders, were less likely to report being diagnosed with a high risk condition for COVID-19, receiving an influenza vaccine in the past 12 months, discussing COVID-19 vaccine with their healthcare provider, perceiving COVID-19 as severe, considering a COVID-19 vaccine important to stop the spread of infection, and wering a mask usually or almost always.

CONCLUSION

Only half of US adults intend to accept COVID-19 vaccines; most others (40%) are uncertain. Levels of immunity associated with community protection will not be achieved without reaching those who are currently uncertain. Characterizing COVID-19 vaccine attitudes and intentions and ascertaining values and trust in local, state, and federal public health authorities that impact vaccine decision-making are essential.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Vaccine Safety, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States; Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States; Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States. Electronic address: dsalmon1@jhu.edu.Institute for Vaccine Safety, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States; Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.Institute for Vaccine Safety, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States; Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.National Association of County and City Health Officials, United States.RTI International, United States.Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.Institute for Vaccine Safety, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States; Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.Aiken, SC 29803, United States(1).Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.Fairfax County Health Department, VA, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33781601

Citation

Salmon, Daniel A., et al. "COVID-19 Vaccination Attitudes, Values and Intentions Among United States Adults Prior to Emergency Use Authorization." Vaccine, vol. 39, no. 19, 2021, pp. 2698-2711.
Salmon DA, Dudley MZ, Brewer J, et al. COVID-19 vaccination attitudes, values and intentions among United States adults prior to emergency use authorization. Vaccine. 2021;39(19):2698-2711.
Salmon, D. A., Dudley, M. Z., Brewer, J., Kan, L., Gerber, J. E., Budigan, H., Proveaux, T. M., Bernier, R., Rimal, R., & Schwartz, B. (2021). COVID-19 vaccination attitudes, values and intentions among United States adults prior to emergency use authorization. Vaccine, 39(19), 2698-2711. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.03.034
Salmon DA, et al. COVID-19 Vaccination Attitudes, Values and Intentions Among United States Adults Prior to Emergency Use Authorization. Vaccine. 2021 05 6;39(19):2698-2711. PubMed PMID: 33781601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - COVID-19 vaccination attitudes, values and intentions among United States adults prior to emergency use authorization. AU - Salmon,Daniel A, AU - Dudley,Matthew Z, AU - Brewer,Janesse, AU - Kan,Lilly, AU - Gerber,Jennifer E, AU - Budigan,Haley, AU - Proveaux,Tina M, AU - Bernier,Roger, AU - Rimal,Rajiv, AU - Schwartz,Benjamin, Y1 - 2021/03/24/ PY - 2021/01/25/received PY - 2021/03/04/revised PY - 2021/03/08/accepted PY - 2021/3/31/pubmed PY - 2021/5/6/medline PY - 2021/3/30/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Hesitancy KW - Trust KW - Vaccines SP - 2698 EP - 2711 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 39 IS - 19 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Safe and effective vaccines against Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) provide the best opportunity to control the pandemic. Having safe and efficacious vaccines available is only half the equation; people must also take them. We describe a study to identify COVID-19 vaccine attitudes, values and intentions immediately preceding authorization of COVID-19 vaccines in the US. METHODS: A national panel survey was conducted to measure intent to receive COVID-19 vaccines as well as disease and vaccine attitudes, values and trust in local, state and federal public health authorities. RESULTS: Greater than 80% of respondents reported confidence they could adhere to COVID recommendations such as mask wearing, social distancing and hand washing. The majority of respondents (70%) reported believing that current drugs were somewhat or very good at treating COVID-19 infection. Vaccine intent fell into three groups: Intenders (50%), Wait and Learn (40%), and Unlikelys (10%). Intent to get vaccinated was substantially lower among African American (32%), and higher among men (56%), those over 60 years of age (61%), those with a Bachelor's degree or higher (63%), and Democrats (63%). The Wait and Learn group, compared to the Intenders, were less likely to report being diagnosed with a high risk condition for COVID-19, receiving an influenza vaccine in the past 12 months, discussing COVID-19 vaccine with their healthcare provider, perceiving COVID-19 as severe, considering a COVID-19 vaccine important to stop the spread of infection, and wering a mask usually or almost always. CONCLUSION: Only half of US adults intend to accept COVID-19 vaccines; most others (40%) are uncertain. Levels of immunity associated with community protection will not be achieved without reaching those who are currently uncertain. Characterizing COVID-19 vaccine attitudes and intentions and ascertaining values and trust in local, state, and federal public health authorities that impact vaccine decision-making are essential. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33781601/COVID_19_vaccination_attitudes_values_and_intentions_among_United_States_adults_prior_to_emergency_use_authorization_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(21)00315-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -