Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The efficacy of exergaming in people with major neurocognitive disorder residing in long-term care facilities: a pilot randomized controlled trial.
Alzheimers Res Ther. 2021 03 30; 13(1):70.AR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is currently unknown whether exergaming is efficacious in people with major neurocognitive disorder (MNCD) residing in long-term care facilities. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) explored the efficacy of a stepping exergame program on gait speed, balance, mobility, reaction time, cognitive and neuropsychiatric outcomes, quality of life, and daily life functioning in people with MNCD residing in long-term care facilities.

METHODS

Participants were randomly assigned to 8 weeks, three times weekly, 15 min of exergaming versus watching preferred music videos. The exergame device consisted of a pressure-sensitive step training platform on which participants performed stepping movements to play the games. The device automatically adapted the training level to the participants' capabilities. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), step reaction time test (SRTT), Montréal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Dementia Quality of Life (DQoL), and Katz Activities of Daily Living (Katz ADL) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. A Quade's non-parametric ANCOVA controlling for baseline values with post hoc Bonferroni correction (p < 0.00625) was used to analyze pre- and post-differences between the groups. Partial eta-squared (η2p) effect sizes were calculated.

RESULTS

Forty-five of 55 randomized inpatients with mild to moderate MNCD (Mini-Mental State Examination score = 17.2 ± 4.5; aged 70-91; 35 women) completed the study. The exergame group (n = 23) demonstrated improvements in gait speed (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.41), total SPPB (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.64), SRTT (p<0.001, η2p = 0.51), MoCA (p<0.001, η2p = 0.38), and reductions in CSDD (p<0.001, η2p = 0.43) compared to the control group (n = 22). There were no differences in NPI (p = 0.165, η2p = 0.05), DQoL (p = 0.012, η2p = 0.16), and ADL (p = 0.008, η2p = 0.16) post-intervention scores between the experimental and control group, albeit DQol and ADL measures showed large effect sizes in the exergame group. The mean attendance rate was 82.9% in the exergame group and 73.7% in the music control group. There were no study-related adverse events reported by the participants, nor observed by the research team.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings of this pilot RCT suggest that an individually adapted exergame training improves lower extremity functioning, cognitive functioning and step reaction time and symptoms of depression in inpatients with MNCD residing in long-term care facilities.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04436302.

Authors+Show Affiliations

KU Leuven Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium. University Psychiatric Centre KU Leuven, Leuven, Kortenberg, Belgium.University Psychiatric Centre KU Leuven, Leuven, Kortenberg, Belgium. KU Leuven Department of Neurosciences, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, ETH Zürich, Leopold-Ruzicka-Weg 4, 8093, Zürich, Switzerland. eling.debruin@hest.ethz.ch. Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. eling.debruin@hest.ethz.ch.Long-term care facility De Wingerd, Leuven, Belgium.South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London, UK. Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, London, UK.Division of Psychology and Mental Health, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. NICM Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.KU Leuven Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium. University Psychiatric Centre KU Leuven, Leuven, Kortenberg, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33785077

Citation

Swinnen, Nathalie, et al. "The Efficacy of Exergaming in People With Major Neurocognitive Disorder Residing in Long-term Care Facilities: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial." Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, vol. 13, no. 1, 2021, p. 70.
Swinnen N, Vandenbulcke M, de Bruin ED, et al. The efficacy of exergaming in people with major neurocognitive disorder residing in long-term care facilities: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Alzheimers Res Ther. 2021;13(1):70.
Swinnen, N., Vandenbulcke, M., de Bruin, E. D., Akkerman, R., Stubbs, B., Firth, J., & Vancampfort, D. (2021). The efficacy of exergaming in people with major neurocognitive disorder residing in long-term care facilities: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, 13(1), 70. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13195-021-00806-7
Swinnen N, et al. The Efficacy of Exergaming in People With Major Neurocognitive Disorder Residing in Long-term Care Facilities: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. Alzheimers Res Ther. 2021 03 30;13(1):70. PubMed PMID: 33785077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The efficacy of exergaming in people with major neurocognitive disorder residing in long-term care facilities: a pilot randomized controlled trial. AU - Swinnen,Nathalie, AU - Vandenbulcke,Mathieu, AU - de Bruin,Eling D, AU - Akkerman,Riekje, AU - Stubbs,Brendon, AU - Firth,Joseph, AU - Vancampfort,Davy, Y1 - 2021/03/30/ PY - 2020/11/25/received PY - 2021/03/10/accepted PY - 2021/3/31/entrez PY - 2021/4/1/pubmed PY - 2021/6/25/medline KW - Brain plasticity KW - Cognition KW - Dementia KW - Depression KW - Physical activity KW - Physical fitness KW - Serious exergames SP - 70 EP - 70 JF - Alzheimer's research & therapy JO - Alzheimers Res Ther VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is currently unknown whether exergaming is efficacious in people with major neurocognitive disorder (MNCD) residing in long-term care facilities. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) explored the efficacy of a stepping exergame program on gait speed, balance, mobility, reaction time, cognitive and neuropsychiatric outcomes, quality of life, and daily life functioning in people with MNCD residing in long-term care facilities. METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to 8 weeks, three times weekly, 15 min of exergaming versus watching preferred music videos. The exergame device consisted of a pressure-sensitive step training platform on which participants performed stepping movements to play the games. The device automatically adapted the training level to the participants' capabilities. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), step reaction time test (SRTT), Montréal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), Dementia Quality of Life (DQoL), and Katz Activities of Daily Living (Katz ADL) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. A Quade's non-parametric ANCOVA controlling for baseline values with post hoc Bonferroni correction (p < 0.00625) was used to analyze pre- and post-differences between the groups. Partial eta-squared (η2p) effect sizes were calculated. RESULTS: Forty-five of 55 randomized inpatients with mild to moderate MNCD (Mini-Mental State Examination score = 17.2 ± 4.5; aged 70-91; 35 women) completed the study. The exergame group (n = 23) demonstrated improvements in gait speed (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.41), total SPPB (p < 0.001, η2p = 0.64), SRTT (p<0.001, η2p = 0.51), MoCA (p<0.001, η2p = 0.38), and reductions in CSDD (p<0.001, η2p = 0.43) compared to the control group (n = 22). There were no differences in NPI (p = 0.165, η2p = 0.05), DQoL (p = 0.012, η2p = 0.16), and ADL (p = 0.008, η2p = 0.16) post-intervention scores between the experimental and control group, albeit DQol and ADL measures showed large effect sizes in the exergame group. The mean attendance rate was 82.9% in the exergame group and 73.7% in the music control group. There were no study-related adverse events reported by the participants, nor observed by the research team. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this pilot RCT suggest that an individually adapted exergame training improves lower extremity functioning, cognitive functioning and step reaction time and symptoms of depression in inpatients with MNCD residing in long-term care facilities. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04436302. SN - 1758-9193 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33785077/The_efficacy_of_exergaming_in_people_with_major_neurocognitive_disorder_residing_in_long_term_care_facilities:_a_pilot_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://alzres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13195-021-00806-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -