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CPMPARISON between COVID-19 and MERS demographic data in Saudi Arabia: a retrospective study.
Libyan J Med. 2021 Dec; 16(1):1910195.LJ

Abstract

The outbreak of corona virus disease (COVID-19) caused by the new severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus 2 began in Wuhan, China, resulting in respiratory disorders. In January of 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic owing to its global spread. Because no studies have investigated COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia, this study investigated similarities and differences between demographic data during the COVID-19 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreaks in Saudi Arabia. A retrospective trend analysis was performed to assess demographic data of all laboratory-confirmed MERS and COVID-19 cases. Patients' charts were reviewed for data on demographics, mortality, citizenship, sex ratio, and age groups with descriptive and comparative statistics; the data were analyzed using a non-parametric binomial test and chi-square test. Of all COVID-19 patients in Saudi Arabia,78%were male patients and 22% were female patients. This proportion of male COVID-19 patients was similar to that of male MERS patients, which also affected male patients more frequently than female patients. The number of COVID-19-positive Saudi cases was lower than that of non-Saudi cases, which were in contrast to that of MERS; COVID-19 appeared to be remarkably similar to MERS with respect to recovered cases. However, the numbers of critical and dead COVID-19 patients have been much lower than those of MERS patients. The largest proportion of COVID-19 and MERS cases (44.05% and 40.8%, respectively) were recorded in the Western region. MERS and COVID-19 exhibited similar threats to the lives of adults and the elderly, despite lower mortality rates during the COVID-19 epidemic. Targeted prevention of and interventions against MERS should be allocated populations according to the areas where they inhabit. However, much more information regarding the dynamics and epidemiology of COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia is needed.Abbrevation : MERS: Middle East Respiratory syndrome; COVID-19: Corona Virus Disease 2019.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Scientific Researcher, Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan.Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33797350

Citation

Mohamed, Rania Ali El Hadi, and Felwa Abdullah Thagfan. "CPMPARISON Between COVID-19 and MERS Demographic Data in Saudi Arabia: a Retrospective Study." The Libyan Journal of Medicine, vol. 16, no. 1, 2021, p. 1910195.
Mohamed RAEH, Abdullah Thagfan F. CPMPARISON between COVID-19 and MERS demographic data in Saudi Arabia: a retrospective study. Libyan J Med. 2021;16(1):1910195.
Mohamed, R. A. E. H., & Abdullah Thagfan, F. (2021). CPMPARISON between COVID-19 and MERS demographic data in Saudi Arabia: a retrospective study. The Libyan Journal of Medicine, 16(1), 1910195. https://doi.org/10.1080/19932820.2021.1910195
Mohamed RAEH, Abdullah Thagfan F. CPMPARISON Between COVID-19 and MERS Demographic Data in Saudi Arabia: a Retrospective Study. Libyan J Med. 2021;16(1):1910195. PubMed PMID: 33797350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CPMPARISON between COVID-19 and MERS demographic data in Saudi Arabia: a retrospective study. AU - Mohamed,Rania Ali El Hadi, AU - Abdullah Thagfan,Felwa, PY - 2021/4/2/entrez PY - 2021/4/3/pubmed PY - 2021/4/13/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - MERS KW - Saudi Arabia KW - respiratory illness SP - 1910195 EP - 1910195 JF - The Libyan journal of medicine JO - Libyan J Med VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - The outbreak of corona virus disease (COVID-19) caused by the new severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus 2 began in Wuhan, China, resulting in respiratory disorders. In January of 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic owing to its global spread. Because no studies have investigated COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia, this study investigated similarities and differences between demographic data during the COVID-19 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreaks in Saudi Arabia. A retrospective trend analysis was performed to assess demographic data of all laboratory-confirmed MERS and COVID-19 cases. Patients' charts were reviewed for data on demographics, mortality, citizenship, sex ratio, and age groups with descriptive and comparative statistics; the data were analyzed using a non-parametric binomial test and chi-square test. Of all COVID-19 patients in Saudi Arabia,78%were male patients and 22% were female patients. This proportion of male COVID-19 patients was similar to that of male MERS patients, which also affected male patients more frequently than female patients. The number of COVID-19-positive Saudi cases was lower than that of non-Saudi cases, which were in contrast to that of MERS; COVID-19 appeared to be remarkably similar to MERS with respect to recovered cases. However, the numbers of critical and dead COVID-19 patients have been much lower than those of MERS patients. The largest proportion of COVID-19 and MERS cases (44.05% and 40.8%, respectively) were recorded in the Western region. MERS and COVID-19 exhibited similar threats to the lives of adults and the elderly, despite lower mortality rates during the COVID-19 epidemic. Targeted prevention of and interventions against MERS should be allocated populations according to the areas where they inhabit. However, much more information regarding the dynamics and epidemiology of COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia is needed.Abbrevation : MERS: Middle East Respiratory syndrome; COVID-19: Corona Virus Disease 2019. SN - 1819-6357 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33797350/CPMPARISON_between_COVID_19_and_MERS_demographic_data_in_Saudi_Arabia:_a_retrospective_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19932820.2021.1910195 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -