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Limited Genetic Diversity Detected in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Variants Circulating in Dromedary Camels in Jordan.
Viruses. 2021 03 31; 13(4)V

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a persistent zoonotic pathogen with frequent spillover from dromedary camels to humans in the Arabian Peninsula, resulting in limited outbreaks of MERS with a high case-fatality rate. Full genome sequence data from camel-derived MERS-CoV variants show diverse lineages circulating in domestic camels with frequent recombination. More than 90% of the available full MERS-CoV genome sequences derived from camels are from just two countries, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE). In this study, we employ a novel method to amplify and sequence the partial MERS-CoV genome with high sensitivity from nasal swabs of infected camels. We recovered more than 99% of the MERS-CoV genome from field-collected samples with greater than 500 TCID50 equivalent per nasal swab from camel herds sampled in Jordan in May 2016. Our subsequent analyses of 14 camel-derived MERS-CoV genomes show a striking lack of genetic diversity circulating in Jordan camels relative to MERS-CoV genome sequences derived from large camel markets in KSA and UAE. The low genetic diversity detected in Jordan camels during our study is consistent with a lack of endemic circulation in these camel herds and reflective of data from MERS outbreaks in humans dominated by nosocomial transmission following a single introduction as reported during the 2015 MERS outbreak in South Korea. Our data suggest transmission of MERS-CoV among two camel herds in Jordan in 2016 following a single introduction event.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA. Paul G. Allen School for Global Health, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA.Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.Rocky Mountain Labs Genomics Unit, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA. Paul G. Allen School for Global Health, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA.Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.National Consultant, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Amman 11194, Jordan.Economics and Public Health Group, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield AL9 7TA, UK.Department of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan.Department of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan.Subregional Office for the Gulf Cooperation Council States and Yemen, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Abu Dhabi 62072, United Arab Emirates.Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.Economics and Public Health Group, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield AL9 7TA, UK.Technical and Marketing Department, United Animal Health, Sheridan, IN 46069, USA.Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA.Department of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan.Department of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan.Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.Virus Ecology Section, Laboratory of Virology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33807288

Citation

Seifert, Stephanie N., et al. "Limited Genetic Diversity Detected in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Variants Circulating in Dromedary Camels in Jordan." Viruses, vol. 13, no. 4, 2021.
Seifert SN, Schulz JE, Ricklefs S, et al. Limited Genetic Diversity Detected in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Variants Circulating in Dromedary Camels in Jordan. Viruses. 2021;13(4).
Seifert, S. N., Schulz, J. E., Ricklefs, S., Letko, M., Yabba, E., Hijazeen, Z. S., Holloway, P., Al-Omari, B., Talafha, H. A., Tibbo, M., Adney, D. R., Guitian, J., Amarin, N., Richt, J. A., McDowell, C., Steel, J., Abu-Basha, E. A., Al-Majali, A. M., van Doremalen, N., & Munster, V. J. (2021). Limited Genetic Diversity Detected in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Variants Circulating in Dromedary Camels in Jordan. Viruses, 13(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040592
Seifert SN, et al. Limited Genetic Diversity Detected in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Variants Circulating in Dromedary Camels in Jordan. Viruses. 2021 03 31;13(4) PubMed PMID: 33807288.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Limited Genetic Diversity Detected in Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Related Coronavirus Variants Circulating in Dromedary Camels in Jordan. AU - Seifert,Stephanie N, AU - Schulz,Jonathan E, AU - Ricklefs,Stacy, AU - Letko,Michael, AU - Yabba,Elangeni, AU - Hijazeen,Zaidoun S, AU - Holloway,Peter, AU - Al-Omari,Bilal, AU - Talafha,Hani A, AU - Tibbo,Markos, AU - Adney,Danielle R, AU - Guitian,Javier, AU - Amarin,Nadim, AU - Richt,Juergen A, AU - McDowell,Chester, AU - Steel,John, AU - Abu-Basha,Ehab A, AU - Al-Majali,Ahmad M, AU - van Doremalen,Neeltje, AU - Munster,Vincent J, Y1 - 2021/03/31/ PY - 2021/02/25/received PY - 2021/03/30/revised PY - 2021/03/30/accepted PY - 2021/4/3/entrez PY - 2021/4/4/pubmed PY - 2021/4/17/medline KW - MERS-CoV KW - coronaviruses KW - phylogenomics KW - population genomics KW - viral genomics KW - zoonoses JF - Viruses JO - Viruses VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a persistent zoonotic pathogen with frequent spillover from dromedary camels to humans in the Arabian Peninsula, resulting in limited outbreaks of MERS with a high case-fatality rate. Full genome sequence data from camel-derived MERS-CoV variants show diverse lineages circulating in domestic camels with frequent recombination. More than 90% of the available full MERS-CoV genome sequences derived from camels are from just two countries, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and United Arab Emirates (UAE). In this study, we employ a novel method to amplify and sequence the partial MERS-CoV genome with high sensitivity from nasal swabs of infected camels. We recovered more than 99% of the MERS-CoV genome from field-collected samples with greater than 500 TCID50 equivalent per nasal swab from camel herds sampled in Jordan in May 2016. Our subsequent analyses of 14 camel-derived MERS-CoV genomes show a striking lack of genetic diversity circulating in Jordan camels relative to MERS-CoV genome sequences derived from large camel markets in KSA and UAE. The low genetic diversity detected in Jordan camels during our study is consistent with a lack of endemic circulation in these camel herds and reflective of data from MERS outbreaks in humans dominated by nosocomial transmission following a single introduction as reported during the 2015 MERS outbreak in South Korea. Our data suggest transmission of MERS-CoV among two camel herds in Jordan in 2016 following a single introduction event. SN - 1999-4915 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33807288/Limited_Genetic_Diversity_Detected_in_Middle_East_Respiratory_Syndrome_Related_Coronavirus_Variants_Circulating_in_Dromedary_Camels_in_Jordan_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=v13040592 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -