Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Venomous snake bites in Italy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.
Trop Med Parasitol. 1988 Mar; 39(1):62-6.TM

Abstract

From 1980 to 1984, a total of 2,329 people who alleged that they had been bitten by venomous snakes were admitted to 292 Italian hospitals having first aid stations. Three died. Most patients (62%) did not show any symptomatology of envenomation. The epidemiological and clinical aspects of 286 patients, out of 885 exhibiting signs and symptoms of snake bite envenomation, have been studied. The symptoms and signs were: oedema, gastro-intestinal symptoms, pain at the site of the bite, respiratory distress, leucocytosis, CNS depression, shock, fever, cyanosis, exanthema, ecchymoses, incoagulable blood, lymphangitis, melaena, thrombocytopenia, haematuria, and ophthalmoplegia. The bites were located only in the upper or lower limbs. Most were caused by Vipera aspis. The severity of envenomation of the 286 affected patients were: 45% minor, 30% mild, 14% moderate, 8% severe and 1% fatal. Most bites occurred in August. The commonest treatment before and during hospitalization was anti-venin.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratorio di Parassitologia, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3387830

Citation

Pozio, E. "Venomous Snake Bites in Italy: Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects." Tropical Medicine and Parasitology : Official Organ of Deutsche Tropenmedizinische Gesellschaft and of Deutsche Gesellschaft Fur Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ), vol. 39, no. 1, 1988, pp. 62-6.
Pozio E. Venomous snake bites in Italy: epidemiological and clinical aspects. Trop Med Parasitol. 1988;39(1):62-6.
Pozio, E. (1988). Venomous snake bites in Italy: epidemiological and clinical aspects. Tropical Medicine and Parasitology : Official Organ of Deutsche Tropenmedizinische Gesellschaft and of Deutsche Gesellschaft Fur Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ), 39(1), 62-6.
Pozio E. Venomous Snake Bites in Italy: Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects. Trop Med Parasitol. 1988;39(1):62-6. PubMed PMID: 3387830.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Venomous snake bites in Italy: epidemiological and clinical aspects. A1 - Pozio,E, PY - 1988/3/1/pubmed PY - 1988/3/1/medline PY - 1988/3/1/entrez SP - 62 EP - 6 JF - Tropical medicine and parasitology : official organ of Deutsche Tropenmedizinische Gesellschaft and of Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) JO - Trop Med Parasitol VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - From 1980 to 1984, a total of 2,329 people who alleged that they had been bitten by venomous snakes were admitted to 292 Italian hospitals having first aid stations. Three died. Most patients (62%) did not show any symptomatology of envenomation. The epidemiological and clinical aspects of 286 patients, out of 885 exhibiting signs and symptoms of snake bite envenomation, have been studied. The symptoms and signs were: oedema, gastro-intestinal symptoms, pain at the site of the bite, respiratory distress, leucocytosis, CNS depression, shock, fever, cyanosis, exanthema, ecchymoses, incoagulable blood, lymphangitis, melaena, thrombocytopenia, haematuria, and ophthalmoplegia. The bites were located only in the upper or lower limbs. Most were caused by Vipera aspis. The severity of envenomation of the 286 affected patients were: 45% minor, 30% mild, 14% moderate, 8% severe and 1% fatal. Most bites occurred in August. The commonest treatment before and during hospitalization was anti-venin. SN - 0177-2392 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3387830/Venomous_snake_bites_in_Italy:_epidemiological_and_clinical_aspects_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.