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The role of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease.
Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2021; 72(1):29-39.RP

Abstract

The aging population is a significant social, medical and economic problem due to increasing prevalence of chronic diseases in elderly population. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of memory and cognitive function. So far, there is neither an effective prevention nor cure for dementia, so more and more attention is paid to the prevention of this group of diseases, particularly to the appropriate diet. Preventive intervention gives the best results if introduced before the first symptoms of dementia, i.e., around the age of 50. This is when the nutritional status, number of synapses, cognition, and neuropathological changes in the nervous system compensate each other, which increases the chances of staying healthy for a longer period of time. It has been proven that dietary habits, which lead to the development of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, significantly increase the risk of dementia. On the other hand, a Mediterranean diet rich in antioxidants, fiber and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have a protective effect on the neurodegenerative process. The beneficial effect of many nutrients on the course of AD has been demonstrated. These include: glutathione, polyphenols, curcumin, coenzyme Q10, vitamins B6, B12, folic acid, unsaturated fatty acids, lecithin, UA, caffeine and some probiotic bacteria. A diet rich in saturated fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) promotes the progression of dementia. Dietary intervention should be introduced as early as possible to minimize the risk of developing dementia. The Mediterranean and DASH diets have been documented to protect against AD. However, the MIND diet is reported to be much more effective in preventing cognitive decline/dementia than either the Mediterranean or DASH diets alone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wrocław Medical University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Dietetics, Students Scientific Club, Wrocław, Poland.Wrocław Medical University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Dietetics, Wrocław, Poland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33882663

Citation

Śliwińska, Sylwia, and Małgorzata Jeziorek. "The Role of Nutrition in Alzheimer's Disease." Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny, vol. 72, no. 1, 2021, pp. 29-39.
Śliwińska S, Jeziorek M. The role of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease. Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2021;72(1):29-39.
Śliwińska, S., & Jeziorek, M. (2021). The role of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease. Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny, 72(1), 29-39. https://doi.org/10.32394/rpzh.2021.0154
Śliwińska S, Jeziorek M. The Role of Nutrition in Alzheimer's Disease. Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig. 2021;72(1):29-39. PubMed PMID: 33882663.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease. AU - Śliwińska,Sylwia, AU - Jeziorek,Małgorzata, PY - 2021/4/22/entrez PY - 2021/4/23/pubmed PY - 2021/11/11/medline KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - MIND diet KW - Mediterranean diet KW - nutrients SP - 29 EP - 39 JF - Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny JO - Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig VL - 72 IS - 1 N2 - The aging population is a significant social, medical and economic problem due to increasing prevalence of chronic diseases in elderly population. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of memory and cognitive function. So far, there is neither an effective prevention nor cure for dementia, so more and more attention is paid to the prevention of this group of diseases, particularly to the appropriate diet. Preventive intervention gives the best results if introduced before the first symptoms of dementia, i.e., around the age of 50. This is when the nutritional status, number of synapses, cognition, and neuropathological changes in the nervous system compensate each other, which increases the chances of staying healthy for a longer period of time. It has been proven that dietary habits, which lead to the development of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, significantly increase the risk of dementia. On the other hand, a Mediterranean diet rich in antioxidants, fiber and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have a protective effect on the neurodegenerative process. The beneficial effect of many nutrients on the course of AD has been demonstrated. These include: glutathione, polyphenols, curcumin, coenzyme Q10, vitamins B6, B12, folic acid, unsaturated fatty acids, lecithin, UA, caffeine and some probiotic bacteria. A diet rich in saturated fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) promotes the progression of dementia. Dietary intervention should be introduced as early as possible to minimize the risk of developing dementia. The Mediterranean and DASH diets have been documented to protect against AD. However, the MIND diet is reported to be much more effective in preventing cognitive decline/dementia than either the Mediterranean or DASH diets alone. SN - 0035-7715 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33882663/The_role_of_nutrition_in_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - http://wydawnictwa.pzh.gov.pl/roczniki_pzh/download-article?id=1368 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -