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Willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 among Bangladeshi adults: Understanding the strategies to optimize vaccination coverage.
PLoS One. 2021; 16(4):e0250495.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the approved COVID-19 vaccine has been shown to be safe and effective, mass vaccination in Bangladeshi people remains a challenge. As a vaccination effort, the study provided an empirical evidence on willingness to vaccinate by sociodemographic, clinical and regional differences in Bangladeshi adults.

METHODS

This cross-sectional analysis from a household survey of 3646 adults aged 18 years or older was conducted in 8 districts of Bangladesh, from December 12, 2020, to January 7, 2021. Multinomial regression examined the impact of socio-demographic, clinical and healthcare-releated factors on hesitancy and reluctance of vaccination for COVID-19.

RESULTS

Of the 3646 respondents (2212 men [60.7%]; mean [sd] age, 37.4 [13.9] years), 74.6% reported their willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 when a safe and effective vaccine is available without a fee, while 8.5% were reluctant to vaccinate. With a minimum fee, 46.5% of the respondents showed intent to vaccinate. Among the respondents, 16.8% reported adequate adherence to health safety regulations, and 35.5% reported high confidence in the country's healthcare system. The COVID-19 vaccine refusal was significantly high in elderly, rural, semi-urban, and slum communities, farmers, day-laborers, homemakers, low-educated group, and those who had low confidence in the country's healthcare system. Also, the prevalence of vaccine hesitancy was high in the elderly population, low-educated group, day-laborers, people with chronic diseases, and people with low confidence in the country's healthcare system.

CONCLUSION

A high prevalence of vaccine refusal and hesitancy was observed in rural people and slum dwellers in Bangladesh. The rural community and slum dwellers had a low literacy level, low adherence to health safety regulations and low confidence in healthcare system. The ongoing app-based registration for vaccination increased hesitancy and reluctancy in low-educated group. For rural, semi-urban, and slum people, outreach centers for vaccination can be established to ensure the vaccine's nearby availability and limit associated travel costs. In rural areas, community health workers, valued community-leaders, and non-governmental organizations can be utilized to motivate and educate people for vaccination against COVID-19. Further, emphasis should be given to the elderly and diseased people with tailored health messages and assurance from healthcare professionals. The media may play a responsible role with the vaccine education program and eliminate the social stigma about the vaccination. Finally, vaccination should be continued without a fee and thus Bangladesh's COVID vaccination program can become a model for other low and middle-income countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Bangladesh (CIPRB), Dhaka, Bangladesh.Department of Media Studies and Journalism, University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Bangladesh (CIPRB), Dhaka, Bangladesh.Global Health Institute, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Hypertension & Research Centre, Rangpur, Bangladesh.Hypertension & Research Centre, Rangpur, Bangladesh.Global Health Institute, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Global Health Institute, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Department of Public Health, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33905442

Citation

Abedin, Minhazul, et al. "Willingness to Vaccinate Against COVID-19 Among Bangladeshi Adults: Understanding the Strategies to Optimize Vaccination Coverage." PloS One, vol. 16, no. 4, 2021, pp. e0250495.
Abedin M, Islam MA, Rahman FN, et al. Willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 among Bangladeshi adults: Understanding the strategies to optimize vaccination coverage. PLoS One. 2021;16(4):e0250495.
Abedin, M., Islam, M. A., Rahman, F. N., Reza, H. M., Hossain, M. Z., Hossain, M. A., Arefin, A., & Hossain, A. (2021). Willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 among Bangladeshi adults: Understanding the strategies to optimize vaccination coverage. PloS One, 16(4), e0250495. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0250495
Abedin M, et al. Willingness to Vaccinate Against COVID-19 Among Bangladeshi Adults: Understanding the Strategies to Optimize Vaccination Coverage. PLoS One. 2021;16(4):e0250495. PubMed PMID: 33905442.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 among Bangladeshi adults: Understanding the strategies to optimize vaccination coverage. AU - Abedin,Minhazul, AU - Islam,Mohammad Aminul, AU - Rahman,Farah Naz, AU - Reza,Hasan Mahmud, AU - Hossain,Mohammad Zakir, AU - Hossain,Mohammad Anwar, AU - Arefin,Adittya, AU - Hossain,Ahmed, Y1 - 2021/04/27/ PY - 2021/02/19/received PY - 2021/04/08/accepted PY - 2021/4/27/entrez PY - 2021/4/28/pubmed PY - 2021/5/8/medline SP - e0250495 EP - e0250495 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although the approved COVID-19 vaccine has been shown to be safe and effective, mass vaccination in Bangladeshi people remains a challenge. As a vaccination effort, the study provided an empirical evidence on willingness to vaccinate by sociodemographic, clinical and regional differences in Bangladeshi adults. METHODS: This cross-sectional analysis from a household survey of 3646 adults aged 18 years or older was conducted in 8 districts of Bangladesh, from December 12, 2020, to January 7, 2021. Multinomial regression examined the impact of socio-demographic, clinical and healthcare-releated factors on hesitancy and reluctance of vaccination for COVID-19. RESULTS: Of the 3646 respondents (2212 men [60.7%]; mean [sd] age, 37.4 [13.9] years), 74.6% reported their willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 when a safe and effective vaccine is available without a fee, while 8.5% were reluctant to vaccinate. With a minimum fee, 46.5% of the respondents showed intent to vaccinate. Among the respondents, 16.8% reported adequate adherence to health safety regulations, and 35.5% reported high confidence in the country's healthcare system. The COVID-19 vaccine refusal was significantly high in elderly, rural, semi-urban, and slum communities, farmers, day-laborers, homemakers, low-educated group, and those who had low confidence in the country's healthcare system. Also, the prevalence of vaccine hesitancy was high in the elderly population, low-educated group, day-laborers, people with chronic diseases, and people with low confidence in the country's healthcare system. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of vaccine refusal and hesitancy was observed in rural people and slum dwellers in Bangladesh. The rural community and slum dwellers had a low literacy level, low adherence to health safety regulations and low confidence in healthcare system. The ongoing app-based registration for vaccination increased hesitancy and reluctancy in low-educated group. For rural, semi-urban, and slum people, outreach centers for vaccination can be established to ensure the vaccine's nearby availability and limit associated travel costs. In rural areas, community health workers, valued community-leaders, and non-governmental organizations can be utilized to motivate and educate people for vaccination against COVID-19. Further, emphasis should be given to the elderly and diseased people with tailored health messages and assurance from healthcare professionals. The media may play a responsible role with the vaccine education program and eliminate the social stigma about the vaccination. Finally, vaccination should be continued without a fee and thus Bangladesh's COVID vaccination program can become a model for other low and middle-income countries. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33905442/Willingness_to_vaccinate_against_COVID_19_among_Bangladeshi_adults:_Understanding_the_strategies_to_optimize_vaccination_coverage_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0250495 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -