Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Should homes and workplaces purchase portable air filters to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections? A systematic review.
PLoS One. 2021; 16(4):e0251049.Plos

Abstract

Respiratory infections, including SARS-CoV-2, are spread via inhalation or ingestion of airborne pathogens. Airborne transmission is difficult to control, particularly indoors. Manufacturers of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters claim they remove almost all small particles including airborne bacteria and viruses. This study investigates whether modern portable, commercially available air filters reduce the incidence of respiratory infections and/or remove bacteria and viruses from indoor air. We systematically searched Medline, Embase and Cochrane for studies published between January 2000 and September 2020. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they included a portable, commercially available air filter in any indoor setting including care homes, schools or healthcare settings, investigating either associations with incidence of respiratory infections or removal and/or capture of aerosolised bacteria and viruses from the air within the filters. Dual data screening and extraction with narrative synthesis. No studies were found investigating the effects of air filters on the incidence of respiratory infections. Two studies investigated bacterial capture within filters and bacterial load in indoor air. One reported higher numbers of viable bacteria in the HEPA filter than in floor dust samples. The other reported HEPA filtration combined with ultraviolet light reduced bacterial load in the air by 41% (sampling time not reported). Neither paper investigated effects on viruses. There is an important absence of evidence regarding the effectiveness of a potentially cost-efficient intervention for indoor transmission of respiratory infections, including SARS-CoV-2. Two studies provide 'proof of principle' that air filters can capture airborne bacteria in an indoor setting. Randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to investigate effects of portable HEPA filters on incidence of respiratory infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Academic Primary Care, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.Centre for Academic Primary Care, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.Centre for Academic Primary Care, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.Centre for Academic Primary Care, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.Centre for Academic Primary Care, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33914823

Citation

Hammond, Ashley, et al. "Should Homes and Workplaces Purchase Portable Air Filters to Reduce the Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and Other Respiratory Infections? a Systematic Review." PloS One, vol. 16, no. 4, 2021, pp. e0251049.
Hammond A, Khalid T, Thornton HV, et al. Should homes and workplaces purchase portable air filters to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections? A systematic review. PLoS One. 2021;16(4):e0251049.
Hammond, A., Khalid, T., Thornton, H. V., Woodall, C. A., & Hay, A. D. (2021). Should homes and workplaces purchase portable air filters to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections? A systematic review. PloS One, 16(4), e0251049. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0251049
Hammond A, et al. Should Homes and Workplaces Purchase Portable Air Filters to Reduce the Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and Other Respiratory Infections? a Systematic Review. PLoS One. 2021;16(4):e0251049. PubMed PMID: 33914823.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Should homes and workplaces purchase portable air filters to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections? A systematic review. AU - Hammond,Ashley, AU - Khalid,Tanzeela, AU - Thornton,Hannah V, AU - Woodall,Claire A, AU - Hay,Alastair D, Y1 - 2021/04/29/ PY - 2020/11/06/received PY - 2021/04/20/accepted PY - 2021/4/29/entrez PY - 2021/4/30/pubmed PY - 2021/5/13/medline SP - e0251049 EP - e0251049 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - Respiratory infections, including SARS-CoV-2, are spread via inhalation or ingestion of airborne pathogens. Airborne transmission is difficult to control, particularly indoors. Manufacturers of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters claim they remove almost all small particles including airborne bacteria and viruses. This study investigates whether modern portable, commercially available air filters reduce the incidence of respiratory infections and/or remove bacteria and viruses from indoor air. We systematically searched Medline, Embase and Cochrane for studies published between January 2000 and September 2020. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they included a portable, commercially available air filter in any indoor setting including care homes, schools or healthcare settings, investigating either associations with incidence of respiratory infections or removal and/or capture of aerosolised bacteria and viruses from the air within the filters. Dual data screening and extraction with narrative synthesis. No studies were found investigating the effects of air filters on the incidence of respiratory infections. Two studies investigated bacterial capture within filters and bacterial load in indoor air. One reported higher numbers of viable bacteria in the HEPA filter than in floor dust samples. The other reported HEPA filtration combined with ultraviolet light reduced bacterial load in the air by 41% (sampling time not reported). Neither paper investigated effects on viruses. There is an important absence of evidence regarding the effectiveness of a potentially cost-efficient intervention for indoor transmission of respiratory infections, including SARS-CoV-2. Two studies provide 'proof of principle' that air filters can capture airborne bacteria in an indoor setting. Randomised controlled trials are urgently needed to investigate effects of portable HEPA filters on incidence of respiratory infections. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33914823/Should_homes_and_workplaces_purchase_portable_air_filters_to_reduce_the_transmission_of_SARS_CoV_2_and_other_respiratory_infections_A_systematic_review_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0251049 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -