Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of three non-human primate aerosol models for glanders, caused by Burkholderia mallei.
Microb Pathog. 2021 Jun; 155:104919.MP

Abstract

Burkholderia mallei is a gram-negative obligate animal pathogen that causes glanders, a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of solipeds including horses, mules, and donkeys. Humans are also susceptible, and exposure can result in a wide range of clinical forms, i.e., subclinical infection, chronic forms with remission and exacerbation, or acute and potentially lethal septicemia and/or pneumonia. Due to intrinsic antibiotic resistance and the ability of the organisms to survive intracellularly, current treatment regimens are protracted and complicated; and no vaccine is available. As a consequence of these issues, and since B. mallei is infectious by the aerosol route, B. mallei is regarded as a major potential biothreat agent. To develop optimal medical countermeasures and diagnostic tests, well characterized animal models of human glanders are needed. The goal of this study was to perform a head-to-head comparison of models employing three commonly used nonhuman primate (NHP) species, the African green monkey (AGM), Rhesus macaque, and the Cynomolgus macaque. The natural history of infection and in vitro clinical, histopathological, immunochemical, and bacteriological parameters were examined. The AGMs were the most susceptible NHP to B. mallei; five of six expired within 14 days. Although none of the Rhesus or Cynomolgus macaques succumbed, the Rhesus monkeys exhibited abnormal signs and clinical findings associated with B. mallei infection; and the latter may be useful for modeling chronic B. mallei infection. Based on the disease progression observations, gross and histochemical pathology, and humoral and cellular immune response findings, the AGM appears to be the optimal model of acute, lethal glanders infection. AGM models of infection by B. pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, have been characterized recently. Thus, the selection of the AGM species provides the research community with a single NHP model for investigations on acute, severe, inhalational melioidosis and glanders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Pathology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Applied and Advanced Technology-Aerobiology, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Biostatistics Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Pathology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Biostatistics Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA. Electronic address: christopher.k.cote.civ@mail.mil.Bacteriology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, USA. Electronic address: susan.l.welkos.vol@mail.mil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33915206

Citation

Waag, David M., et al. "Comparison of Three Non-human Primate Aerosol Models for Glanders, Caused By Burkholderia Mallei." Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 155, 2021, p. 104919.
Waag DM, Chance TB, Trevino SR, et al. Comparison of three non-human primate aerosol models for glanders, caused by Burkholderia mallei. Microb Pathog. 2021;155:104919.
Waag, D. M., Chance, T. B., Trevino, S. R., Rossi, F. D., Fetterer, D. P., Amemiya, K., Dankmeyer, J. L., Ingavale, S. S., Tobery, S. A., Zeng, X., Kern, S. J., Worsham, P. L., Cote, C. K., & Welkos, S. L. (2021). Comparison of three non-human primate aerosol models for glanders, caused by Burkholderia mallei. Microbial Pathogenesis, 155, 104919. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2021.104919
Waag DM, et al. Comparison of Three Non-human Primate Aerosol Models for Glanders, Caused By Burkholderia Mallei. Microb Pathog. 2021;155:104919. PubMed PMID: 33915206.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of three non-human primate aerosol models for glanders, caused by Burkholderia mallei. AU - Waag,David M, AU - Chance,Taylor B, AU - Trevino,Sylvia R, AU - Rossi,Franco D, AU - Fetterer,David P, AU - Amemiya,Kei, AU - Dankmeyer,Jennifer L, AU - Ingavale,Susham S, AU - Tobery,Steven A, AU - Zeng,Xiankun, AU - Kern,Steven J, AU - Worsham,Patricia L, AU - Cote,Christopher K, AU - Welkos,Susan L, Y1 - 2021/04/27/ PY - 2021/01/08/received PY - 2021/03/30/revised PY - 2021/04/01/accepted PY - 2021/4/30/pubmed PY - 2021/4/30/medline PY - 2021/4/29/entrez KW - Burkholderia mallei KW - Glanders KW - Infection KW - Inhalation KW - Nonhuman primates SP - 104919 EP - 104919 JF - Microbial pathogenesis JO - Microb Pathog VL - 155 N2 - Burkholderia mallei is a gram-negative obligate animal pathogen that causes glanders, a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of solipeds including horses, mules, and donkeys. Humans are also susceptible, and exposure can result in a wide range of clinical forms, i.e., subclinical infection, chronic forms with remission and exacerbation, or acute and potentially lethal septicemia and/or pneumonia. Due to intrinsic antibiotic resistance and the ability of the organisms to survive intracellularly, current treatment regimens are protracted and complicated; and no vaccine is available. As a consequence of these issues, and since B. mallei is infectious by the aerosol route, B. mallei is regarded as a major potential biothreat agent. To develop optimal medical countermeasures and diagnostic tests, well characterized animal models of human glanders are needed. The goal of this study was to perform a head-to-head comparison of models employing three commonly used nonhuman primate (NHP) species, the African green monkey (AGM), Rhesus macaque, and the Cynomolgus macaque. The natural history of infection and in vitro clinical, histopathological, immunochemical, and bacteriological parameters were examined. The AGMs were the most susceptible NHP to B. mallei; five of six expired within 14 days. Although none of the Rhesus or Cynomolgus macaques succumbed, the Rhesus monkeys exhibited abnormal signs and clinical findings associated with B. mallei infection; and the latter may be useful for modeling chronic B. mallei infection. Based on the disease progression observations, gross and histochemical pathology, and humoral and cellular immune response findings, the AGM appears to be the optimal model of acute, lethal glanders infection. AGM models of infection by B. pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, have been characterized recently. Thus, the selection of the AGM species provides the research community with a single NHP model for investigations on acute, severe, inhalational melioidosis and glanders. SN - 1096-1208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33915206/Comparison_of_three_non_human_primate_aerosol_models_for_glanders_caused_by_Burkholderia_mallei_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0882-4010(21)00191-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -