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Adherence and Dietary Composition during Intermittent vs. Continuous Calorie Restriction: Follow-Up Data from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Adults with Overweight or Obesity.
Nutrients. 2021 Apr 05; 13(4)N

Abstract

Although intermittent calorie restriction (ICR) has become popular as an alternative weight loss strategy to continuous calorie restriction (CCR), there is insufficient evidence on diet quality during ICR and on its feasibility over longer time periods. Thus, we compared dietary composition and adherence between ICR and CCR in a follow-up analysis of a randomized trial. A total of 98 participants with overweight or obesity [BMI (kg/m2) 25-39.9, 35-65 years, 49% females] were randomly assigned to ICR, operationalized as a "5:2 diet" (energy intake: ~100% on five non-restricted (NR) days, ~25% on two restricted (R) days), or CCR (daily energy intake: ~80%). The trial included a 12-week (wk) intervention phase, and follow-up assessments at wk24, wk50 and wk102. Apart from a higher proportion of energy intake from protein with ICR vs. CCR during the intervention (wk2: p < 0.001; wk12: p = 0.002), there were no significant differences with respect to changes in dietary composition over time between the groups, while overall adherence to the interventions appeared to be good. No significant difference between ICR and CCR regarding weight change at wk102 was observed (p = 0.63). However, self-reported adherence was worse for ICR than CCR, with 71.1% vs. 32.5% of the participants reporting not to or only rarely have followed the regimen to which they were assigned between wk50 and wk102. These results indicate that within a weight management setting, ICR and CCR were equivalent in achieving modest weight loss over two years while affecting dietary composition in a comparable manner.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Medical Faculty, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Huntsman Cancer Institute and Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Medical Faculty, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK. Heidelberg Institute of Global Health, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33916366

Citation

Pannen, Sarah T., et al. "Adherence and Dietary Composition During Intermittent Vs. Continuous Calorie Restriction: Follow-Up Data From a Randomized Controlled Trial in Adults With Overweight or Obesity." Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 4, 2021.
Pannen ST, Maldonado SG, Nonnenmacher T, et al. Adherence and Dietary Composition during Intermittent vs. Continuous Calorie Restriction: Follow-Up Data from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Adults with Overweight or Obesity. Nutrients. 2021;13(4).
Pannen, S. T., Maldonado, S. G., Nonnenmacher, T., Sowah, S. A., Gruner, L. F., Watzinger, C., Nischwitz, K., Ulrich, C. M., Kaaks, R., Schübel, R., Grafetstätter, M., & Kühn, T. (2021). Adherence and Dietary Composition during Intermittent vs. Continuous Calorie Restriction: Follow-Up Data from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Adults with Overweight or Obesity. Nutrients, 13(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041195
Pannen ST, et al. Adherence and Dietary Composition During Intermittent Vs. Continuous Calorie Restriction: Follow-Up Data From a Randomized Controlled Trial in Adults With Overweight or Obesity. Nutrients. 2021 Apr 5;13(4) PubMed PMID: 33916366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adherence and Dietary Composition during Intermittent vs. Continuous Calorie Restriction: Follow-Up Data from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Adults with Overweight or Obesity. AU - Pannen,Sarah T, AU - Maldonado,Sandra González, AU - Nonnenmacher,Tobias, AU - Sowah,Solomon A, AU - Gruner,Laura F, AU - Watzinger,Cora, AU - Nischwitz,Karin, AU - Ulrich,Cornelia M, AU - Kaaks,Rudolf, AU - Schübel,Ruth, AU - Grafetstätter,Mirja, AU - Kühn,Tilman, Y1 - 2021/04/05/ PY - 2021/02/26/received PY - 2021/03/25/revised PY - 2021/04/02/accepted PY - 2021/4/30/entrez PY - 2021/5/1/pubmed PY - 2021/6/5/medline KW - compliance KW - diet quality KW - energy intake KW - fasting KW - food records KW - intermittent energy restriction KW - obesity KW - weight loss JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - Although intermittent calorie restriction (ICR) has become popular as an alternative weight loss strategy to continuous calorie restriction (CCR), there is insufficient evidence on diet quality during ICR and on its feasibility over longer time periods. Thus, we compared dietary composition and adherence between ICR and CCR in a follow-up analysis of a randomized trial. A total of 98 participants with overweight or obesity [BMI (kg/m2) 25-39.9, 35-65 years, 49% females] were randomly assigned to ICR, operationalized as a "5:2 diet" (energy intake: ~100% on five non-restricted (NR) days, ~25% on two restricted (R) days), or CCR (daily energy intake: ~80%). The trial included a 12-week (wk) intervention phase, and follow-up assessments at wk24, wk50 and wk102. Apart from a higher proportion of energy intake from protein with ICR vs. CCR during the intervention (wk2: p < 0.001; wk12: p = 0.002), there were no significant differences with respect to changes in dietary composition over time between the groups, while overall adherence to the interventions appeared to be good. No significant difference between ICR and CCR regarding weight change at wk102 was observed (p = 0.63). However, self-reported adherence was worse for ICR than CCR, with 71.1% vs. 32.5% of the participants reporting not to or only rarely have followed the regimen to which they were assigned between wk50 and wk102. These results indicate that within a weight management setting, ICR and CCR were equivalent in achieving modest weight loss over two years while affecting dietary composition in a comparable manner. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33916366/Adherence_and_Dietary_Composition_during_Intermittent_vs__Continuous_Calorie_Restriction:_Follow_Up_Data_from_a_Randomized_Controlled_Trial_in_Adults_with_Overweight_or_Obesity_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu13041195 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -