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Transmission risk of viruses in large mucosalivary droplets on the surface of objects: A time-based analysis.
Infect Dis Now. 2021 May; 51(3):219-227.ID

Abstract

The novel human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has been responsible for a worldwide pandemic. Although media transmission through contaminated surfaces is one of the most recognized ways of transmission, the study on the number and viability of viruses surviving on a surface after leaving the host represents a "blind spot" in current research. In this paper we have reviewed studies on the physical process of droplet evaporation on media surfaces, and analyzed the recent literature related to experiments on the decay of the viral concentration and infectious activity of SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses on those surface and in the air. The huge differences in the risk of media transmission of large saliva and sputum droplets were analyzed in terms of time elapsed. Due to the rapid decrease of water content in the evaporated droplets and the increased concentration of each component, the living environment of the virus tended to deteriorate sharply, and virus concentration plummeted within a few minutes. Although a virus can be detected in a matter of hours, tens of hours, or days, the risk of transmission is negligible compared to when it first left the host. This study suggests that the key to prevention and control is to start from the source, the earlier the better. It is extremely important to develop good public health habits, wear masks, and wash hands frequently. That said, excessive disinfection and sterilization of surfaces during a later period may have adverse effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MOE Key Laboratory of Deep Earth Science and Engineering, College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.MOE Key Laboratory of Deep Earth Science and Engineering, College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.Department of Solid Waste Treatment Technology, Sichuan Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Pollution Control for Heavy Metals, Sichuan Academy of Environmental Sciences, Chengdu, China.Institute for Disaster Management and Reconstruction, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.MOE Key Laboratory of Deep Earth Science and Engineering, College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.Institute for Disaster Management and Reconstruction, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.MOE Key Laboratory of Deep Earth Science and Engineering, College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China; Institute for Disaster Management and Reconstruction, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. Electronic address: Longes2@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

33934808

Citation

Guo, Luyao, et al. "Transmission Risk of Viruses in Large Mucosalivary Droplets On the Surface of Objects: a Time-based Analysis." Infectious Diseases Now, vol. 51, no. 3, 2021, pp. 219-227.
Guo L, Wang M, Zhang L, et al. Transmission risk of viruses in large mucosalivary droplets on the surface of objects: A time-based analysis. Infect Dis Now. 2021;51(3):219-227.
Guo, L., Wang, M., Zhang, L., Mao, N., An, C., Xu, L., & Long, E. (2021). Transmission risk of viruses in large mucosalivary droplets on the surface of objects: A time-based analysis. Infectious Diseases Now, 51(3), 219-227. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idnow.2020.11.001
Guo L, et al. Transmission Risk of Viruses in Large Mucosalivary Droplets On the Surface of Objects: a Time-based Analysis. Infect Dis Now. 2021;51(3):219-227. PubMed PMID: 33934808.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transmission risk of viruses in large mucosalivary droplets on the surface of objects: A time-based analysis. AU - Guo,Luyao, AU - Wang,Min, AU - Zhang,Li, AU - Mao,Ning, AU - An,Congkang, AU - Xu,Luting, AU - Long,Enshen, Y1 - 2020/12/30/ PY - 2020/08/07/received PY - 2020/10/18/revised PY - 2020/11/05/accepted PY - 2021/5/3/entrez PY - 2021/5/4/pubmed PY - 2021/5/11/medline KW - Droplet evaporation KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - Transmission risk KW - Virus-containing droplets SP - 219 EP - 227 JF - Infectious diseases now JO - Infect Dis Now VL - 51 IS - 3 N2 - The novel human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has been responsible for a worldwide pandemic. Although media transmission through contaminated surfaces is one of the most recognized ways of transmission, the study on the number and viability of viruses surviving on a surface after leaving the host represents a "blind spot" in current research. In this paper we have reviewed studies on the physical process of droplet evaporation on media surfaces, and analyzed the recent literature related to experiments on the decay of the viral concentration and infectious activity of SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses on those surface and in the air. The huge differences in the risk of media transmission of large saliva and sputum droplets were analyzed in terms of time elapsed. Due to the rapid decrease of water content in the evaporated droplets and the increased concentration of each component, the living environment of the virus tended to deteriorate sharply, and virus concentration plummeted within a few minutes. Although a virus can be detected in a matter of hours, tens of hours, or days, the risk of transmission is negligible compared to when it first left the host. This study suggests that the key to prevention and control is to start from the source, the earlier the better. It is extremely important to develop good public health habits, wear masks, and wash hands frequently. That said, excessive disinfection and sterilization of surfaces during a later period may have adverse effects. SN - 2666-9919 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/33934808/Transmission_risk_of_viruses_in_large_mucosalivary_droplets_on_the_surface_of_objects:_A_time_based_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2666-9919(20)00011-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -