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Parents' intent to vaccinate against influenza during the COVID-19 pandemic in two regions in Switzerland.
Swiss Med Wkly. 2021 05 10; 151:w20508.SM

Abstract

AIMS OF THE STUDY

The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to overlap with the seasonal influenza epidemic, increasing the risk of overextending the health system capacity in Switzerland. Influenza vaccine uptake has remained low in most countries, including Switzerland. The aim of the study was to determine parents’ intentions towards influenza vaccination of their children, as well as themselves, and to assess regional differences.

METHODS

Parents presenting to four paediatric emergency departments (Zurich, Bern, Bellinzona, Geneva) were asked to complete an online survey during and after the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic (April to June 2020). The anonymised survey included demographic information, vaccination history and intentions to vaccinate against influenza, as well as attitudes towards future vaccination against COVID-19.

RESULTS

The majority of children (92%; 602/654) were up-to-date on their vaccination schedule. In 2019/2020, 7.2% (47/654) were vaccinated against influenza. Children with chronic illnesses were more frequently vaccinated than healthy children (19.2% vs 5.6%; p = 0.002). For the coming winter season, 111 (17%) parents stated they plan to vaccinate their children against influenza, more than double the rate from last year, and 383 (59.2%) parents suggested they will vaccinate against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. Regional differences between “German” and “Latin” Switzerland were found for parents’ intent to have their children vaccinated against influenza next season (Zurich and Bern 14.3%, Bellinzona and Geneva 27.2%, p <0.001), but not for a hypothetical vaccination against COVID-19 (Zurich and Bern 59.1%, Bellinzona and Geneva 59.7%, p = 0.894).

CONCLUSIONS

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a substantial increase of parents’ intention to vaccinate their children against influenza, especially in hard-hit “Latin” Switzerland. The Swiss government and public health organisations can leverage these regional results to promote influenza vaccination among children for the coming seasons.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Paediatric Emergency Department, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Switzerland.The Pediatric Research in Emergency Therapeutics (PRETx) Program, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, and BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada.Paediatric Emergency Department, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Switzerland.Paediatric Emergency Department, Inselspital University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland.Paediatric Emergency Department, Paediatric Institute of Italian Part of Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland.Paediatric Emergency Department, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34002802

Citation

Seiler, Michelle, et al. "Parents' Intent to Vaccinate Against Influenza During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Two Regions in Switzerland." Swiss Medical Weekly, vol. 151, 2021, pp. w20508.
Seiler M, Goldman RD, Staubli G, et al. Parents' intent to vaccinate against influenza during the COVID-19 pandemic in two regions in Switzerland. Swiss Med Wkly. 2021;151:w20508.
Seiler, M., Goldman, R. D., Staubli, G., Hoeffe, J., Gualco, G., Manzano, S., & Part Of The International Covid-Parental Attitude Study Covipas Group, . (2021). Parents' intent to vaccinate against influenza during the COVID-19 pandemic in two regions in Switzerland. Swiss Medical Weekly, 151, w20508. https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2021.20508
Seiler M, et al. Parents' Intent to Vaccinate Against Influenza During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Two Regions in Switzerland. Swiss Med Wkly. 2021 05 10;151:w20508. PubMed PMID: 34002802.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parents' intent to vaccinate against influenza during the COVID-19 pandemic in two regions in Switzerland. AU - Seiler,Michelle, AU - Goldman,Ran D, AU - Staubli,Georg, AU - Hoeffe,Julia, AU - Gualco,Gianluca, AU - Manzano,Sergio, AU - Part Of The International Covid-Parental Attitude Study Covipas Group,, Y1 - 2021/05/12/ PY - 2021/5/18/entrez PY - 2021/5/19/pubmed PY - 2021/5/28/medline SP - w20508 EP - w20508 JF - Swiss medical weekly JO - Swiss Med Wkly VL - 151 N2 - AIMS OF THE STUDY: The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to overlap with the seasonal influenza epidemic, increasing the risk of overextending the health system capacity in Switzerland. Influenza vaccine uptake has remained low in most countries, including Switzerland. The aim of the study was to determine parents’ intentions towards influenza vaccination of their children, as well as themselves, and to assess regional differences. METHODS: Parents presenting to four paediatric emergency departments (Zurich, Bern, Bellinzona, Geneva) were asked to complete an online survey during and after the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic (April to June 2020). The anonymised survey included demographic information, vaccination history and intentions to vaccinate against influenza, as well as attitudes towards future vaccination against COVID-19. RESULTS: The majority of children (92%; 602/654) were up-to-date on their vaccination schedule. In 2019/2020, 7.2% (47/654) were vaccinated against influenza. Children with chronic illnesses were more frequently vaccinated than healthy children (19.2% vs 5.6%; p = 0.002). For the coming winter season, 111 (17%) parents stated they plan to vaccinate their children against influenza, more than double the rate from last year, and 383 (59.2%) parents suggested they will vaccinate against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. Regional differences between “German” and “Latin” Switzerland were found for parents’ intent to have their children vaccinated against influenza next season (Zurich and Bern 14.3%, Bellinzona and Geneva 27.2%, p <0.001), but not for a hypothetical vaccination against COVID-19 (Zurich and Bern 59.1%, Bellinzona and Geneva 59.7%, p = 0.894). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a substantial increase of parents’ intention to vaccinate their children against influenza, especially in hard-hit “Latin” Switzerland. The Swiss government and public health organisations can leverage these regional results to promote influenza vaccination among children for the coming seasons. SN - 1424-3997 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34002802/Parents'_intent_to_vaccinate_against_influenza_during_the_COVID_19_pandemic_in_two_regions_in_Switzerland_ L2 - https://doi.emh.ch/10.4414/smw.2021.20508 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -