Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Thermoregulatory responses of middle-aged and young men during dry-heat acclimation.
J Appl Physiol (1985). 1988 Jul; 65(1):65-71.JA

Abstract

Thermoregulatory responses during heat acclimation were compared between nine young (mean age 21.2 yr) and nine middle-aged men (mean age 46.4 yr) who were matched (P greater than 0.05) for body weight, surface area, surface area-to-weight ratio, percent body fat, and maximal aerobic power. After evaluation in a comfortable environment (22 degrees C, 50% relative humidity), the men were heat acclimated by treadmill walking (1.56 m/s, 5% grade) for two 50-min exercise bouts separated by 10 min of rest for 10 consecutive days in a hot dry (49 degrees C ambient temperature, 20% relative humidity) environment. During the first day of heat exposure performance time was 27 min longer (P less than 0.05) for the middle-aged men, whereas final rectal and skin temperatures and heart rate were lower, and final total body sweat loss was higher (P less than 0.05) compared with the young men. These thermoregulatory advantages for the middle-aged men persisted for the first few days of exercise-heat acclimation (P less than 0.05). After acclimation no thermoregulatory or performance time differences were observed between groups (P greater than 0.05). Sweating sensitivity, esophageal temperature at sweating onset, and the sweating onset time did not differ (P greater than 0.05) between groups either pre- or postacclimatization. Plasma osmolality and sodium concentration were slightly lower for the young men both pre- and postacclimatization; however, both groups had a similar percent change in plasma volume from rest to exercise during these tests.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts 01760-5007.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3403494

Citation

Pandolf, K B., et al. "Thermoregulatory Responses of Middle-aged and Young Men During Dry-heat Acclimation." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 65, no. 1, 1988, pp. 65-71.
Pandolf KB, Cadarette BS, Sawka MN, et al. Thermoregulatory responses of middle-aged and young men during dry-heat acclimation. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1988;65(1):65-71.
Pandolf, K. B., Cadarette, B. S., Sawka, M. N., Young, A. J., Francesconi, R. P., & Gonzalez, R. R. (1988). Thermoregulatory responses of middle-aged and young men during dry-heat acclimation. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 65(1), 65-71.
Pandolf KB, et al. Thermoregulatory Responses of Middle-aged and Young Men During Dry-heat Acclimation. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1988;65(1):65-71. PubMed PMID: 3403494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thermoregulatory responses of middle-aged and young men during dry-heat acclimation. AU - Pandolf,K B, AU - Cadarette,B S, AU - Sawka,M N, AU - Young,A J, AU - Francesconi,R P, AU - Gonzalez,R R, PY - 1988/7/1/pubmed PY - 1988/7/1/medline PY - 1988/7/1/entrez SP - 65 EP - 71 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J Appl Physiol (1985) VL - 65 IS - 1 N2 - Thermoregulatory responses during heat acclimation were compared between nine young (mean age 21.2 yr) and nine middle-aged men (mean age 46.4 yr) who were matched (P greater than 0.05) for body weight, surface area, surface area-to-weight ratio, percent body fat, and maximal aerobic power. After evaluation in a comfortable environment (22 degrees C, 50% relative humidity), the men were heat acclimated by treadmill walking (1.56 m/s, 5% grade) for two 50-min exercise bouts separated by 10 min of rest for 10 consecutive days in a hot dry (49 degrees C ambient temperature, 20% relative humidity) environment. During the first day of heat exposure performance time was 27 min longer (P less than 0.05) for the middle-aged men, whereas final rectal and skin temperatures and heart rate were lower, and final total body sweat loss was higher (P less than 0.05) compared with the young men. These thermoregulatory advantages for the middle-aged men persisted for the first few days of exercise-heat acclimation (P less than 0.05). After acclimation no thermoregulatory or performance time differences were observed between groups (P greater than 0.05). Sweating sensitivity, esophageal temperature at sweating onset, and the sweating onset time did not differ (P greater than 0.05) between groups either pre- or postacclimatization. Plasma osmolality and sodium concentration were slightly lower for the young men both pre- and postacclimatization; however, both groups had a similar percent change in plasma volume from rest to exercise during these tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3403494/Thermoregulatory_responses_of_middle_aged_and_young_men_during_dry_heat_acclimation_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jappl.1988.65.1.65?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -