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Divergent patterns of heavy metal accumulation in paddy fields affect the dietary safety of rice: a case study in Maoming City, China.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2021 Oct; 28(38):53533-53543.ES

Abstract

The objective of this work was to study the impact of large petrochemical plants and mining operations on the accumulation of heavy metals in farmland and rice, as well as assess their potential risks on human health. The contents of seven heavy metals, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co, Cu, and Mn, were monitored in a typical polluted paddy soil-rice system near a petrochemical plant and mining area in Maoming, China. The results showed that the content of Cd in the soil exceeds the standard rate by 100%, and the single factor pollution index of Cd was 5.12, which is considered heavy pollution. Excessive heavy metals can inhibit and poison the growth of rice plants. Rice plants can maintain a certain level of heavy metal content by reducing the absorption or interception in the root cells, leading to great differences in the distribution of different heavy metals in plant tissues. Cadmium, Cu, Co, and Mn are easily absorbed from the soil by rice roots, while other heavy metals are relatively difficult to absorb by rice roots. Cuprum, Cd, Co, Pb, and Cr were mainly accumulated in the root of rice, but Mn and Ni migrate to the above ground plant tissues quickly. The brown rice produced in the paddy fields in the study area was seriously polluted. The concentration of Cd, Pb, and Ni in brown rice exceeded the standard by 100%, and Cr in brown rice also exceeded the standard by 80%. If residents consume rice from the study area, their daily intake of Cr and Cd will be 1.02 and 3.24 times higher, respectively, than the standard limit recommended by the FAO/WHO. The irrigation streams were polluted due to the discharge of petrochemical plants and mining wastewater, causing the serious pollution of heavy metals in the surrounding paddy fields. The rice produced in this area poses a serious risk to consumers, and so this problem of pollution should be addressed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Pollution Processes and Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Maoming, 525000, Guangdong, China.Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Pollution Processes and Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Maoming, 525000, Guangdong, China. xueyuan-zhang@gdupt.edu.cn.Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Pollution Processes and Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Maoming, 525000, Guangdong, China.Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Pollution Processes and Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Maoming, 525000, Guangdong, China.Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200444, China.Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Petrochemical Pollution Processes and Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Maoming, 525000, Guangdong, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34036492

Citation

Teng, Qing, et al. "Divergent Patterns of Heavy Metal Accumulation in Paddy Fields Affect the Dietary Safety of Rice: a Case Study in Maoming City, China." Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 28, no. 38, 2021, pp. 53533-53543.
Teng Q, Zhang D, Deng F, et al. Divergent patterns of heavy metal accumulation in paddy fields affect the dietary safety of rice: a case study in Maoming City, China. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2021;28(38):53533-53543.
Teng, Q., Zhang, D., Deng, F., Du, C., Luo, F., & Yang, C. (2021). Divergent patterns of heavy metal accumulation in paddy fields affect the dietary safety of rice: a case study in Maoming City, China. Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 28(38), 53533-53543. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-14572-4
Teng Q, et al. Divergent Patterns of Heavy Metal Accumulation in Paddy Fields Affect the Dietary Safety of Rice: a Case Study in Maoming City, China. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2021;28(38):53533-53543. PubMed PMID: 34036492.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Divergent patterns of heavy metal accumulation in paddy fields affect the dietary safety of rice: a case study in Maoming City, China. AU - Teng,Qing, AU - Zhang,Dongmei, AU - Deng,Fucai, AU - Du,Cheng, AU - Luo,Fan, AU - Yang,Chunping, Y1 - 2021/05/25/ PY - 2020/12/03/received PY - 2021/05/20/accepted PY - 2021/5/27/pubmed PY - 2021/9/30/medline PY - 2021/5/26/entrez KW - Heavy metals KW - Mining and smelting KW - Paddy soils KW - Petrochemical plants KW - Pollution KW - Risk SP - 53533 EP - 53543 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 28 IS - 38 N2 - The objective of this work was to study the impact of large petrochemical plants and mining operations on the accumulation of heavy metals in farmland and rice, as well as assess their potential risks on human health. The contents of seven heavy metals, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co, Cu, and Mn, were monitored in a typical polluted paddy soil-rice system near a petrochemical plant and mining area in Maoming, China. The results showed that the content of Cd in the soil exceeds the standard rate by 100%, and the single factor pollution index of Cd was 5.12, which is considered heavy pollution. Excessive heavy metals can inhibit and poison the growth of rice plants. Rice plants can maintain a certain level of heavy metal content by reducing the absorption or interception in the root cells, leading to great differences in the distribution of different heavy metals in plant tissues. Cadmium, Cu, Co, and Mn are easily absorbed from the soil by rice roots, while other heavy metals are relatively difficult to absorb by rice roots. Cuprum, Cd, Co, Pb, and Cr were mainly accumulated in the root of rice, but Mn and Ni migrate to the above ground plant tissues quickly. The brown rice produced in the paddy fields in the study area was seriously polluted. The concentration of Cd, Pb, and Ni in brown rice exceeded the standard by 100%, and Cr in brown rice also exceeded the standard by 80%. If residents consume rice from the study area, their daily intake of Cr and Cd will be 1.02 and 3.24 times higher, respectively, than the standard limit recommended by the FAO/WHO. The irrigation streams were polluted due to the discharge of petrochemical plants and mining wastewater, causing the serious pollution of heavy metals in the surrounding paddy fields. The rice produced in this area poses a serious risk to consumers, and so this problem of pollution should be addressed. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34036492/Divergent_patterns_of_heavy_metal_accumulation_in_paddy_fields_affect_the_dietary_safety_of_rice:_a_case_study_in_Maoming_City_China_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -