Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Slow Progress with the Most Widely Used Animal Model: Ten Years of Metacognition Research in Rats, 2009-2019.
Anim Behav Cogn. 2019 Nov; 6(4):273-277.AB

Abstract

Until recently, demonstrations of metacognition in primates have been frequent and robust, while in rodents they have been few and equivocal. However, the past few years have seen a change in this trend with the introduction of novel methods to determine whether metacognitive responding is governed by internal or external sources of stimulus control in rats. Such studies suggest that like primates, rats can indeed use internal assessment of memory strengths to guide metacognitive responding. Strong behavioral paradigms suitable for rodents support the development of easily-accessible animal models for the neurobiology of metamemory and translational studies on diseases of memory. They also allow for a more complete comparative study of the evolution of metacognition, as the presence of this ability in rodents would suggest that metacognition evolved ~80 rather than ~25 million years ago.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Providence College.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34056076

Citation

Templer, Victoria L.. "Slow Progress With the Most Widely Used Animal Model: Ten Years of Metacognition Research in Rats, 2009-2019." Animal Behavior and Cognition, vol. 6, no. 4, 2019, pp. 273-277.
Templer VL. Slow Progress with the Most Widely Used Animal Model: Ten Years of Metacognition Research in Rats, 2009-2019. Anim Behav Cogn. 2019;6(4):273-277.
Templer, V. L. (2019). Slow Progress with the Most Widely Used Animal Model: Ten Years of Metacognition Research in Rats, 2009-2019. Animal Behavior and Cognition, 6(4), 273-277. https://doi.org/10.26451/abc.06.04.07.2019
Templer VL. Slow Progress With the Most Widely Used Animal Model: Ten Years of Metacognition Research in Rats, 2009-2019. Anim Behav Cogn. 2019;6(4):273-277. PubMed PMID: 34056076.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Slow Progress with the Most Widely Used Animal Model: Ten Years of Metacognition Research in Rats, 2009-2019. A1 - Templer,Victoria L, PY - 2021/5/31/entrez PY - 2019/11/1/pubmed PY - 2019/11/1/medline KW - Declarative memory KW - Explicit memory KW - Memory awareness KW - Metamemory KW - Monitoring KW - Rodent SP - 273 EP - 277 JF - Animal behavior and cognition JO - Anim Behav Cogn VL - 6 IS - 4 N2 - Until recently, demonstrations of metacognition in primates have been frequent and robust, while in rodents they have been few and equivocal. However, the past few years have seen a change in this trend with the introduction of novel methods to determine whether metacognitive responding is governed by internal or external sources of stimulus control in rats. Such studies suggest that like primates, rats can indeed use internal assessment of memory strengths to guide metacognitive responding. Strong behavioral paradigms suitable for rodents support the development of easily-accessible animal models for the neurobiology of metamemory and translational studies on diseases of memory. They also allow for a more complete comparative study of the evolution of metacognition, as the presence of this ability in rodents would suggest that metacognition evolved ~80 rather than ~25 million years ago. SN - 2372-5052 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34056076/Slow_Progress_with_the_Most_Widely_Used_Animal_Model:_Ten_Years_of_Metacognition_Research_in_Rats_2009_2019_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.