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The Joint Effect of Maternal Marital Status and Type of Household Cooking Fuel on Child Nutritional Status in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Cross-Sectional Surveys on Children from 31 Countries.
Nutrients. 2021 May 03; 13(5)N

Abstract

The current study sought to investigate the joint effect of maternal marital status and type of household cooking fuel on child nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa. Data in the children's files of 31 sub-Saharan African countries were pooled from the Demographic and Health Surveys collected between 2010 and 2019. The outcome variables were three child anthropometrics: stunting (height-for-age z-scores); wasting (weight-for-height z-scores); and underweight (weight-for-age z-scores). The joint effect of maternal marital status and type of household cooking fuel on child nutritional status was examined using multilevel regression models. The results were presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) at p < 0.05. The percentages of children who were stunted, wasted and underweight in the 31 countries in sub-Saharan Africa were 31%, 8% and 17%, respectively. On the joint effect of maternal marital status and type of household cooking fuel on stunting, we found that compared to children born to married mothers who used clean household cooking fuel, children born to single mothers who use unclean household cooking fuel, children born to single women who use clean household cooking fuel, and children born to married women who used unclean household cooking were more likely to be stunted. With wasting, children born to single mothers who used unclean household cooking fuel and children born to married women who used unclean household cooking fuel were more likely to be wasted compared to children born to married mothers who used clean household cooking fuel. With underweight, we found that compared to children born to married mothers who used clean household cooking fuel, children born to single mothers who used unclean household cooking fuel, children born to single women who used clean household cooking fuel and children born to married women who used unclean household cooking were more likely to be underweight. It is imperative for the governments of the 31 sub-Saharan African countries to double their efforts to end the use of unclean household cooking fuel. This goal could be achieved by promoting clean household cooking fuel (e.g., electricity, gas, ethanol, solar, etc.) through effective health education, and promotion programmes. The attention of policymakers is drawn to the urgent need for children's nutritional status policies and programmes (e.g., dietary supplementation, increasing dietary diversity, improving agriculture and food security) to be targeted towards at-risk sub-populations (i.e., single mothered households).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Africa Centre of Excellence in Coastal Resilience, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana. Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana.Department of Population and Health, College of Humanities and Legal Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana. College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.Africa Centre of Excellence in Coastal Resilience, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana. Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana.Department of Population and Health, College of Humanities and Legal Studies, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana.Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast PMB TF0494, Ghana. Neurocognition and Action-Biomechanics-Research Group, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, Postfach 10 01 31, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany.College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.School of Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34063613

Citation

Amadu, Iddrisu, et al. "The Joint Effect of Maternal Marital Status and Type of Household Cooking Fuel On Child Nutritional Status in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Cross-Sectional Surveys On Children From 31 Countries." Nutrients, vol. 13, no. 5, 2021.
Amadu I, Seidu AA, Duku E, et al. The Joint Effect of Maternal Marital Status and Type of Household Cooking Fuel on Child Nutritional Status in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Cross-Sectional Surveys on Children from 31 Countries. Nutrients. 2021;13(5).
Amadu, I., Seidu, A. A., Duku, E., Okyere, J., Hagan, J. E., Hormenu, T., & Ahinkorah, B. O. (2021). The Joint Effect of Maternal Marital Status and Type of Household Cooking Fuel on Child Nutritional Status in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Cross-Sectional Surveys on Children from 31 Countries. Nutrients, 13(5). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051541
Amadu I, et al. The Joint Effect of Maternal Marital Status and Type of Household Cooking Fuel On Child Nutritional Status in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Cross-Sectional Surveys On Children From 31 Countries. Nutrients. 2021 May 3;13(5) PubMed PMID: 34063613.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Joint Effect of Maternal Marital Status and Type of Household Cooking Fuel on Child Nutritional Status in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Cross-Sectional Surveys on Children from 31 Countries. AU - Amadu,Iddrisu, AU - Seidu,Abdul-Aziz, AU - Duku,Eric, AU - Okyere,Joshua, AU - Hagan,John Elvis,Jr AU - Hormenu,Thomas, AU - Ahinkorah,Bright Opoku, Y1 - 2021/05/03/ PY - 2021/03/12/received PY - 2021/04/21/revised PY - 2021/04/28/accepted PY - 2021/6/2/entrez PY - 2021/6/3/pubmed PY - 2021/7/24/medline KW - biomass fuel KW - child nutrition KW - single-motherhood KW - solar KW - sub-Saharan Africa JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 13 IS - 5 N2 - The current study sought to investigate the joint effect of maternal marital status and type of household cooking fuel on child nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa. Data in the children's files of 31 sub-Saharan African countries were pooled from the Demographic and Health Surveys collected between 2010 and 2019. The outcome variables were three child anthropometrics: stunting (height-for-age z-scores); wasting (weight-for-height z-scores); and underweight (weight-for-age z-scores). The joint effect of maternal marital status and type of household cooking fuel on child nutritional status was examined using multilevel regression models. The results were presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) at p < 0.05. The percentages of children who were stunted, wasted and underweight in the 31 countries in sub-Saharan Africa were 31%, 8% and 17%, respectively. On the joint effect of maternal marital status and type of household cooking fuel on stunting, we found that compared to children born to married mothers who used clean household cooking fuel, children born to single mothers who use unclean household cooking fuel, children born to single women who use clean household cooking fuel, and children born to married women who used unclean household cooking were more likely to be stunted. With wasting, children born to single mothers who used unclean household cooking fuel and children born to married women who used unclean household cooking fuel were more likely to be wasted compared to children born to married mothers who used clean household cooking fuel. With underweight, we found that compared to children born to married mothers who used clean household cooking fuel, children born to single mothers who used unclean household cooking fuel, children born to single women who used clean household cooking fuel and children born to married women who used unclean household cooking were more likely to be underweight. It is imperative for the governments of the 31 sub-Saharan African countries to double their efforts to end the use of unclean household cooking fuel. This goal could be achieved by promoting clean household cooking fuel (e.g., electricity, gas, ethanol, solar, etc.) through effective health education, and promotion programmes. The attention of policymakers is drawn to the urgent need for children's nutritional status policies and programmes (e.g., dietary supplementation, increasing dietary diversity, improving agriculture and food security) to be targeted towards at-risk sub-populations (i.e., single mothered households). SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34063613/The_Joint_Effect_of_Maternal_Marital_Status_and_Type_of_Household_Cooking_Fuel_on_Child_Nutritional_Status_in_Sub_Saharan_Africa:_Analysis_of_Cross_Sectional_Surveys_on_Children_from_31_Countries_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu13051541 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -