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The role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy in the intergenerational transmission of childhood adversity.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2021 Aug; 130:105283.P

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) of a woman can lead to dysregulated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during pregnancy, which can in turn adversely affect her offspring HPA axis function. Choline and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are dietary factors with the potential to favorably modify the stress response system. The current study aimed to investigate whether maternal choline intake and DHA status moderate the effects of maternal ACEs exposure on maternal and infant HPA axes function. Participants were a sub-sample of the prospective longitudinal Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study consisting of 340 mothers and 238 infants. We collected data on maternal ACEs, maternal choline intake (24-hour dietary recall) and serum phospholipid DHA concentrations (at each trimester). Women self-collected saliva samples on two consecutive days (at waking, +30 min, 1100 h, and 2100 h) in each trimester to calculate the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and total daytime cortisol. Infants' salivary cortisol was measured before and after (20, and 40 min) exposure to a blood draw stressor 3 months postpartum. During pregnancy, choline intake moderated (reduced) the association between maternal ACEs and CAR (β = -0.003; 95% CI -0.006, -0.003), but not total daytime cortisol. DHA status did not moderate the association between ACEs and CAR or total daytime cortisol. Choline intake also moderated (reduced) the association between maternal CAR and infant cortisol during a stress task (β = -0.0001; 95% CI -0.0002, -0.00003). Maternal DHA status revealed no modifying effects on these associations. Our findings suggest that maternal choline intake, but not DHA status, can buffer the associations between ACEs and maternal HPA axis, as well as maternal and infant HPA axes function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; Faculty of Nursing, & Cumming School of Medicine (Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Community Health Sciences), University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. Electronic address: ggiesbre@ucalgary.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34082275

Citation

Vaghef-Mehrabani, Elnaz, et al. "The Role of Maternal Nutrition During Pregnancy in the Intergenerational Transmission of Childhood Adversity." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 130, 2021, p. 105283.
Vaghef-Mehrabani E, Thomas-Argyriou JC, Lewis ED, et al. The role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy in the intergenerational transmission of childhood adversity. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2021;130:105283.
Vaghef-Mehrabani, E., Thomas-Argyriou, J. C., Lewis, E. D., Field, C. J., Wang, Y., Campbell, T., Letourneau, N., & Giesbrecht, G. F. (2021). The role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy in the intergenerational transmission of childhood adversity. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 130, 105283. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2021.105283
Vaghef-Mehrabani E, et al. The Role of Maternal Nutrition During Pregnancy in the Intergenerational Transmission of Childhood Adversity. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2021;130:105283. PubMed PMID: 34082275.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy in the intergenerational transmission of childhood adversity. AU - Vaghef-Mehrabani,Elnaz, AU - Thomas-Argyriou,Jenna C, AU - Lewis,Erin D, AU - Field,Catherine J, AU - Wang,Yanan, AU - Campbell,Tavis, AU - Letourneau,Nicole, AU - Giesbrecht,Gerald F, Y1 - 2021/05/25/ PY - 2021/01/19/received PY - 2021/05/14/revised PY - 2021/05/18/accepted PY - 2021/6/4/pubmed PY - 2021/6/4/medline PY - 2021/6/3/entrez KW - ACEs KW - Adverse childhood experiences KW - Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study KW - CAR KW - Choline KW - Cortisol KW - DHA KW - Docosahexaenoic acid KW - HPA axis KW - Pregnancy SP - 105283 EP - 105283 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 130 N2 - Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) of a woman can lead to dysregulated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during pregnancy, which can in turn adversely affect her offspring HPA axis function. Choline and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are dietary factors with the potential to favorably modify the stress response system. The current study aimed to investigate whether maternal choline intake and DHA status moderate the effects of maternal ACEs exposure on maternal and infant HPA axes function. Participants were a sub-sample of the prospective longitudinal Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study consisting of 340 mothers and 238 infants. We collected data on maternal ACEs, maternal choline intake (24-hour dietary recall) and serum phospholipid DHA concentrations (at each trimester). Women self-collected saliva samples on two consecutive days (at waking, +30 min, 1100 h, and 2100 h) in each trimester to calculate the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and total daytime cortisol. Infants' salivary cortisol was measured before and after (20, and 40 min) exposure to a blood draw stressor 3 months postpartum. During pregnancy, choline intake moderated (reduced) the association between maternal ACEs and CAR (β = -0.003; 95% CI -0.006, -0.003), but not total daytime cortisol. DHA status did not moderate the association between ACEs and CAR or total daytime cortisol. Choline intake also moderated (reduced) the association between maternal CAR and infant cortisol during a stress task (β = -0.0001; 95% CI -0.0002, -0.00003). Maternal DHA status revealed no modifying effects on these associations. Our findings suggest that maternal choline intake, but not DHA status, can buffer the associations between ACEs and maternal HPA axis, as well as maternal and infant HPA axes function. SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34082275/The_role_of_maternal_nutrition_during_pregnancy_in_the_intergenerational_transmission_of_childhood_adversity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(21)00157-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -