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Protective efficacy of Ad26.COV2.S against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 in macaques.
Nature. 2021 08; 596(7872):423-427.Nat

Abstract

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that partially evade neutralizing antibodies poses a threat to the efficacy of current COVID-19 vaccines1,2. The Ad26.COV2.S vaccine expresses a stabilized spike protein from the WA1/2020 strain of SARS-CoV-2, and has recently demonstrated protective efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 in humans in several geographical regions-including in South Africa, where 95% of sequenced viruses in cases of COVID-19 were the B.1.351 variant3. Here we show that Ad26.COV2.S elicits humoral and cellular immune responses that cross-react with the B.1.351 variant and protects against B.1.351 challenge in rhesus macaques. Ad26.COV2.S induced lower binding and neutralizing antibodies against B.1.351 as compared to WA1/2020, but elicited comparable CD8 and CD4 T cell responses against the WA1/2020, B.1.351, B.1.1.7, P.1 and CAL.20C variants. B.1.351 infection of control rhesus macaques resulted in higher levels of virus replication in bronchoalveolar lavage and nasal swabs than did WA1/2020 infection. Ad26.COV2.S provided robust protection against both WA1/2020 and B.1.351, although we observed higher levels of virus in vaccinated macaques after B.1.351 challenge. These data demonstrate that Ad26.COV2.S provided robust protection against B.1.351 challenge in rhesus macaques. Our findings have important implications for vaccine control of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, USA.Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Bioqual, Rockville, MD, USA.Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, USA.University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.Janssen Vaccines & Prevention, Leiden, The Netherlands.Janssen Vaccines & Prevention, Leiden, The Netherlands.Janssen Vaccines & Prevention, Leiden, The Netherlands.Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu. Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA. dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34161961

Citation

Yu, Jingyou, et al. "Protective Efficacy of Ad26.COV2.S Against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 in Macaques." Nature, vol. 596, no. 7872, 2021, pp. 423-427.
Yu J, Tostanoski LH, Mercado NB, et al. Protective efficacy of Ad26.COV2.S against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 in macaques. Nature. 2021;596(7872):423-427.
Yu, J., Tostanoski, L. H., Mercado, N. B., McMahan, K., Liu, J., Jacob-Dolan, C., Chandrashekar, A., Atyeo, C., Martinez, D. R., Anioke, T., Bondzie, E. A., Chang, A., Gardner, S., Giffin, V. M., Hope, D. L., Nampanya, F., Nkolola, J., Patel, S., Sanborn, O., ... Barouch, D. H. (2021). Protective efficacy of Ad26.COV2.S against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 in macaques. Nature, 596(7872), 423-427. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03732-8
Yu J, et al. Protective Efficacy of Ad26.COV2.S Against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 in Macaques. Nature. 2021;596(7872):423-427. PubMed PMID: 34161961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Protective efficacy of Ad26.COV2.S against SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 in macaques. AU - Yu,Jingyou, AU - Tostanoski,Lisa H, AU - Mercado,Noe B, AU - McMahan,Katherine, AU - Liu,Jinyan, AU - Jacob-Dolan,Catherine, AU - Chandrashekar,Abishek, AU - Atyeo,Caroline, AU - Martinez,David R, AU - Anioke,Tochi, AU - Bondzie,Esther A, AU - Chang,Aiquan, AU - Gardner,Sarah, AU - Giffin,Victoria M, AU - Hope,David L, AU - Nampanya,Felix, AU - Nkolola,Joseph, AU - Patel,Shivani, AU - Sanborn,Owen, AU - Sellers,Daniel, AU - Wan,Huahua, AU - Hayes,Tammy, AU - Bauer,Katherine, AU - Pessaint,Laurent, AU - Valentin,Daniel, AU - Flinchbaugh,Zack, AU - Brown,Renita, AU - Cook,Anthony, AU - Bueno-Wilkerson,Deandre, AU - Teow,Elyse, AU - Andersen,Hanne, AU - Lewis,Mark G, AU - Martinot,Amanda J, AU - Baric,Ralph S, AU - Alter,Galit, AU - Wegmann,Frank, AU - Zahn,Roland, AU - Schuitemaker,Hanneke, AU - Barouch,Dan H, Y1 - 2021/06/23/ PY - 2021/04/15/received PY - 2021/06/16/accepted PY - 2021/6/24/pubmed PY - 2021/8/25/medline PY - 2021/6/23/entrez SP - 423 EP - 427 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 596 IS - 7872 N2 - The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that partially evade neutralizing antibodies poses a threat to the efficacy of current COVID-19 vaccines1,2. The Ad26.COV2.S vaccine expresses a stabilized spike protein from the WA1/2020 strain of SARS-CoV-2, and has recently demonstrated protective efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 in humans in several geographical regions-including in South Africa, where 95% of sequenced viruses in cases of COVID-19 were the B.1.351 variant3. Here we show that Ad26.COV2.S elicits humoral and cellular immune responses that cross-react with the B.1.351 variant and protects against B.1.351 challenge in rhesus macaques. Ad26.COV2.S induced lower binding and neutralizing antibodies against B.1.351 as compared to WA1/2020, but elicited comparable CD8 and CD4 T cell responses against the WA1/2020, B.1.351, B.1.1.7, P.1 and CAL.20C variants. B.1.351 infection of control rhesus macaques resulted in higher levels of virus replication in bronchoalveolar lavage and nasal swabs than did WA1/2020 infection. Ad26.COV2.S provided robust protection against both WA1/2020 and B.1.351, although we observed higher levels of virus in vaccinated macaques after B.1.351 challenge. These data demonstrate that Ad26.COV2.S provided robust protection against B.1.351 challenge in rhesus macaques. Our findings have important implications for vaccine control of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34161961/Protective_efficacy_of_Ad26_COV2_S_against_SARS_CoV_2_B_1_351_in_macaques_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03732-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -