Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Breast Milk and Breastfeeding of Infants Born to SARS-CoV-2 Positive Mothers: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study.
Am J Perinatol. 2021 09; 38(11):1209-1216.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

There are limited published data on the transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus from mothers to newborns through breastfeeding or from breast milk. The World Health Organization released guidelines encouraging mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to breastfeed as the benefits of breastfeeding outweighs the possible risk of transmission. The objective of this study was to determine if SARS-CoV-2 was present in the breast milk of lactating mothers who had a positive SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal swab test prior to delivery, and the clinical outcomes for their newborns.

STUDY DESIGN

This was a single-center, observational, prospective cohort study. Maternal-newborn dyads that delivered at New York University Langone Hospital Brooklyn with confirmed maternal SARS-CoV-2 positive screen test at the time of admission were recruited for the study. Breast milk samples were collected during postpartum hospitalization and tested for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 genes N1 and N2 by two-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, the clinical characteristics of the maternal newborn dyad, results of nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 testing, and neonatal follow-up data were collected.

RESULTS

A total of 19 mothers were included in the study and their infants who were all fed breast milk. Breast milk samples from 18 mothers tested negative for SARS-CoV-2, and 1 was positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. The infant who ingested the breast milk that tested positive had a negative nasopharyngeal test for SARS-CoV-2, and had a benign clinical course. There was no evidence of significant clinical infection during the hospital stay or from outpatient neonatal follow-up data for all the infants included in this study.

CONCLUSION

In a small cohort of SARS-CoV-2 positive lactating mothers giving birth at our institution, most of their breast milk samples (95%) contained no detectable virus, and there was no evidence of COVID-19 infection in their breast milk-fed neonates.

KEY POINTS

· Breast milk may rarely contain detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA and was not detected in asymptomatic mothers.. · Breast milk with detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA from a symptomatic mother had no clinical significance for her infant.. · Breast feeding with appropriate infection control instructions appears to be safe in mother with COVID infection..

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Long Island School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Grossman School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Long Island School of Medicine, New York City, New York.Department of Pediatrics, New York University Long Island School of Medicine, New York City, New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34182576

Citation

Kunjumon, Bgee, et al. "Breast Milk and Breastfeeding of Infants Born to SARS-CoV-2 Positive Mothers: a Prospective Observational Cohort Study." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 38, no. 11, 2021, pp. 1209-1216.
Kunjumon B, Wachtel EV, Lumba R, et al. Breast Milk and Breastfeeding of Infants Born to SARS-CoV-2 Positive Mothers: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study. Am J Perinatol. 2021;38(11):1209-1216.
Kunjumon, B., Wachtel, E. V., Lumba, R., Quan, M., Remon, J., Louie, M., Verma, S., Moffat, M. A., Kouba, I., Bennett, T. A., Mejia, C. M., Mally, P. V., Lin, X., & Hanna, N. (2021). Breast Milk and Breastfeeding of Infants Born to SARS-CoV-2 Positive Mothers: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study. American Journal of Perinatology, 38(11), 1209-1216. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1731451
Kunjumon B, et al. Breast Milk and Breastfeeding of Infants Born to SARS-CoV-2 Positive Mothers: a Prospective Observational Cohort Study. Am J Perinatol. 2021;38(11):1209-1216. PubMed PMID: 34182576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast Milk and Breastfeeding of Infants Born to SARS-CoV-2 Positive Mothers: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study. AU - Kunjumon,Bgee, AU - Wachtel,Elena V, AU - Lumba,Rishi, AU - Quan,Michelle, AU - Remon,Juan, AU - Louie,Moi, AU - Verma,Sourabh, AU - Moffat,Michael A, AU - Kouba,Insaf, AU - Bennett,Terri-Ann, AU - Mejia,Claudia Manzano De, AU - Mally,Pradeep V, AU - Lin,Xinhua, AU - Hanna,Nazeeh, Y1 - 2021/06/28/ PY - 2021/6/29/pubmed PY - 2021/9/2/medline PY - 2021/6/28/entrez SP - 1209 EP - 1216 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 38 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: There are limited published data on the transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus from mothers to newborns through breastfeeding or from breast milk. The World Health Organization released guidelines encouraging mothers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to breastfeed as the benefits of breastfeeding outweighs the possible risk of transmission. The objective of this study was to determine if SARS-CoV-2 was present in the breast milk of lactating mothers who had a positive SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal swab test prior to delivery, and the clinical outcomes for their newborns. STUDY DESIGN: This was a single-center, observational, prospective cohort study. Maternal-newborn dyads that delivered at New York University Langone Hospital Brooklyn with confirmed maternal SARS-CoV-2 positive screen test at the time of admission were recruited for the study. Breast milk samples were collected during postpartum hospitalization and tested for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 genes N1 and N2 by two-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, the clinical characteristics of the maternal newborn dyad, results of nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 testing, and neonatal follow-up data were collected. RESULTS: A total of 19 mothers were included in the study and their infants who were all fed breast milk. Breast milk samples from 18 mothers tested negative for SARS-CoV-2, and 1 was positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. The infant who ingested the breast milk that tested positive had a negative nasopharyngeal test for SARS-CoV-2, and had a benign clinical course. There was no evidence of significant clinical infection during the hospital stay or from outpatient neonatal follow-up data for all the infants included in this study. CONCLUSION: In a small cohort of SARS-CoV-2 positive lactating mothers giving birth at our institution, most of their breast milk samples (95%) contained no detectable virus, and there was no evidence of COVID-19 infection in their breast milk-fed neonates. KEY POINTS: · Breast milk may rarely contain detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA and was not detected in asymptomatic mothers.. · Breast milk with detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA from a symptomatic mother had no clinical significance for her infant.. · Breast feeding with appropriate infection control instructions appears to be safe in mother with COVID infection.. SN - 1098-8785 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34182576/Breast_Milk_and_Breastfeeding_of_Infants_Born_to_SARS_CoV_2_Positive_Mothers:_A_Prospective_Observational_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0041-1731451 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -