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Trust in government, intention to vaccinate and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: A comparative survey of five large cities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia.
Vaccine. 2021 Jun 23 [Online ahead of print]V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is widespread hesitancy towards COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia.

OBJECTIVE

To identify predictors of willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 in five cities with varying COVID-19 incidence in the US, UK, and Australia.

DESIGN

Online, cross-sectional survey of adults from Dynata's research panel in July-September 2020.

PARTICIPANTS, SETTING

Adults aged 18 and over in Sydney, Melbourne, London, New York City, or Phoenix.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES

Willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine; reason for vaccine intention.

STATISTICAL METHODS

To identify predictors of intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, we used Poisson regression with robust error estimation to produce prevalence ratios.

RESULTS

The proportion willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine was 70% in London, 71% NYC, 72% in Sydney, 76% in Phoenix, and 78% in Melbourne. Age was the only sociodemographic characteristic that predicted willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in all five cities. In Sydney and Melbourne, participants with high confidence in their current government had greater willingness to receive the vaccine (PR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.07-1.44 and PR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.74-1.62), while participants with high confidence in their current government in NYC and Phoenix were less likely to be willing to receive the vaccine (PR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.72-0.85 and PR = 0.85; 95% CI = 0.76-0.96).

LIMITATIONS

Consumer panels can be subject to bias and may not be representative of the general population.

CONCLUSIONS

Success for COVID-19 vaccination programs requires high levels of vaccine acceptance. Our data suggests more than 25% of adults may not be willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, but many of them were not explicitly anti-vaccination and thus may become more willing to vaccinate over time. Among the three countries surveyed, there appears to be cultural differences, political influences, and differing experiences with COVID-19 that may affect willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biosecurity Research Program, The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: mjtrent@protonmail.com.School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: h.seale@unsw.edu.au.School of Population Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: abrar.chughtai@protonmail.com.Institute for Vaccine Safety, Departments of International Health and Health, Behavior and Society, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.Biosecurity Research Program, The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: rainam@protonmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34218963

Citation

Trent, Mallory, et al. "Trust in Government, Intention to Vaccinate and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: a Comparative Survey of Five Large Cities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia." Vaccine, 2021.
Trent M, Seale H, Chughtai AA, et al. Trust in government, intention to vaccinate and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: A comparative survey of five large cities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Vaccine. 2021.
Trent, M., Seale, H., Chughtai, A. A., Salmon, D., & MacIntyre, C. R. (2021). Trust in government, intention to vaccinate and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: A comparative survey of five large cities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Vaccine. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.06.048
Trent M, et al. Trust in Government, Intention to Vaccinate and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: a Comparative Survey of Five Large Cities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Vaccine. 2021 Jun 23; PubMed PMID: 34218963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trust in government, intention to vaccinate and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: A comparative survey of five large cities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. AU - Trent,Mallory, AU - Seale,Holly, AU - Chughtai,Abrar Ahmad, AU - Salmon,Daniel, AU - MacIntyre,C Raina, Y1 - 2021/06/23/ PY - 2021/01/04/received PY - 2021/05/31/revised PY - 2021/06/19/accepted PY - 2021/7/5/entrez PY - 2021/7/6/pubmed PY - 2021/7/6/medline KW - COVID-19 KW - Coronavirus KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - Vaccine hesitancy JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine N2 - BACKGROUND: There is widespread hesitancy towards COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 in five cities with varying COVID-19 incidence in the US, UK, and Australia. DESIGN: Online, cross-sectional survey of adults from Dynata's research panel in July-September 2020. PARTICIPANTS, SETTING: Adults aged 18 and over in Sydney, Melbourne, London, New York City, or Phoenix. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine; reason for vaccine intention. STATISTICAL METHODS: To identify predictors of intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, we used Poisson regression with robust error estimation to produce prevalence ratios. RESULTS: The proportion willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine was 70% in London, 71% NYC, 72% in Sydney, 76% in Phoenix, and 78% in Melbourne. Age was the only sociodemographic characteristic that predicted willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in all five cities. In Sydney and Melbourne, participants with high confidence in their current government had greater willingness to receive the vaccine (PR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.07-1.44 and PR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.74-1.62), while participants with high confidence in their current government in NYC and Phoenix were less likely to be willing to receive the vaccine (PR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.72-0.85 and PR = 0.85; 95% CI = 0.76-0.96). LIMITATIONS: Consumer panels can be subject to bias and may not be representative of the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Success for COVID-19 vaccination programs requires high levels of vaccine acceptance. Our data suggests more than 25% of adults may not be willing to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, but many of them were not explicitly anti-vaccination and thus may become more willing to vaccinate over time. Among the three countries surveyed, there appears to be cultural differences, political influences, and differing experiences with COVID-19 that may affect willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34218963/Trust_in_government_intention_to_vaccinate_and_COVID_19_vaccine_hesitancy:_A_comparative_survey_of_five_large_cities_in_the_United_States_United_Kingdom_and_Australia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(21)00798-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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