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UVC disinfects SARS-CoV-2 by induction of viral genome damage without apparent effects on viral morphology and proteins.
Sci Rep. 2021 07 05; 11(1):13804.SR

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been a pandemic threat worldwide and causes severe health and economic burdens. Contaminated environments, such as personal items and room surfaces, are considered to have virus transmission potential. Ultraviolet C (UVC) light has demonstrated germicidal ability and removes environmental contamination. UVC has inactivated SARS-CoV-2; however, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. It was confirmed here that UVC 253.7 nm, with a dose of 500 μW/cm2, completely inactivated SARS-CoV-2 in a time-dependent manner and reduced virus infectivity by 10-4.9-fold within 30 s. Immunoblotting analysis for viral spike and nucleocapsid proteins showed that UVC treatment did not damage viral proteins. The viral particle morphology remained intact even when the virus completely lost infectivity after UVC irradiation, as observed by transmission electronic microscopy. In contrast, UVC irradiation-induced genome damage was identified using the newly developed long reverse-transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay, but not conventional RT-qPCR. The six developed long RT-PCR assays that covered the full-length viral genome clearly indicated a negative correlation between virus infectivity and UVC irradiation-induced genome damage (R2 ranging from 0.75 to 0.96). Altogether, these results provide evidence that UVC inactivates SARS-CoV-2 through the induction of viral genome damage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Global Infectious Diseases Control Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, the University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8657, Japan. Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan.Laboratory of Global Infectious Diseases Control Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, the University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8657, Japan. Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan.Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan. Farmroid Co.,Ltd., 3-22-4 Funado, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, 174-0041, Japan.Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan. Photonics Control Technology Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan.Photonics Control Technology Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan.Benno Laboratory, Baton Zone Program, RIKEN Cluster for Science, Technology and Innovation Hub, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan.Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan.Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan.Laboratory of Global Infectious Diseases Control Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, the University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8657, Japan. aida@riken.jp. Division of Hematology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi, Kami-Cho, Itabashi, Tokyo, 173-8610, Japan. aida@riken.jp. Benno Laboratory, Baton Zone Program, RIKEN Cluster for Science, Technology and Innovation Hub, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan. aida@riken.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

34226623

Citation

Lo, Chieh-Wen, et al. "UVC Disinfects SARS-CoV-2 By Induction of Viral Genome Damage Without Apparent Effects On Viral Morphology and Proteins." Scientific Reports, vol. 11, no. 1, 2021, p. 13804.
Lo CW, Matsuura R, Iimura K, et al. UVC disinfects SARS-CoV-2 by induction of viral genome damage without apparent effects on viral morphology and proteins. Sci Rep. 2021;11(1):13804.
Lo, C. W., Matsuura, R., Iimura, K., Wada, S., Shinjo, A., Benno, Y., Nakagawa, M., Takei, M., & Aida, Y. (2021). UVC disinfects SARS-CoV-2 by induction of viral genome damage without apparent effects on viral morphology and proteins. Scientific Reports, 11(1), 13804. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-93231-7
Lo CW, et al. UVC Disinfects SARS-CoV-2 By Induction of Viral Genome Damage Without Apparent Effects On Viral Morphology and Proteins. Sci Rep. 2021 07 5;11(1):13804. PubMed PMID: 34226623.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - UVC disinfects SARS-CoV-2 by induction of viral genome damage without apparent effects on viral morphology and proteins. AU - Lo,Chieh-Wen, AU - Matsuura,Ryosuke, AU - Iimura,Kazuki, AU - Wada,Satoshi, AU - Shinjo,Atsushi, AU - Benno,Yoshimi, AU - Nakagawa,Masaru, AU - Takei,Masami, AU - Aida,Yoko, Y1 - 2021/07/05/ PY - 2020/12/29/received PY - 2021/06/22/accepted PY - 2021/7/6/entrez PY - 2021/7/7/pubmed PY - 2021/7/16/medline SP - 13804 EP - 13804 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been a pandemic threat worldwide and causes severe health and economic burdens. Contaminated environments, such as personal items and room surfaces, are considered to have virus transmission potential. Ultraviolet C (UVC) light has demonstrated germicidal ability and removes environmental contamination. UVC has inactivated SARS-CoV-2; however, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. It was confirmed here that UVC 253.7 nm, with a dose of 500 μW/cm2, completely inactivated SARS-CoV-2 in a time-dependent manner and reduced virus infectivity by 10-4.9-fold within 30 s. Immunoblotting analysis for viral spike and nucleocapsid proteins showed that UVC treatment did not damage viral proteins. The viral particle morphology remained intact even when the virus completely lost infectivity after UVC irradiation, as observed by transmission electronic microscopy. In contrast, UVC irradiation-induced genome damage was identified using the newly developed long reverse-transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay, but not conventional RT-qPCR. The six developed long RT-PCR assays that covered the full-length viral genome clearly indicated a negative correlation between virus infectivity and UVC irradiation-induced genome damage (R2 ranging from 0.75 to 0.96). Altogether, these results provide evidence that UVC inactivates SARS-CoV-2 through the induction of viral genome damage. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/34226623/UVC_disinfects_SARS_CoV_2_by_induction_of_viral_genome_damage_without_apparent_effects_on_viral_morphology_and_proteins_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-93231-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -